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  1. Coastal birds survive because their populations can absorb impacts and recover quickly from hurricanes -- even storms many times larger than anything previously observed. View the full article
  2. The ancestor of some of the largest flying birds ever has been found in Waipara, New Zealand. View the full article
  3. A new article identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueling flight across the Gulf of Mexico. View the full article
  4. Grey squirrels eavesdrop on the chatter between nearby songbirds as a sign of safety. View the full article
  5. A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances. View the full article
  6. A team of scientists successfully moved sage-grouse, a threatened bird species in Washington state, from one area of their range to another to increase their numbers and diversify their gene pool. A new study on the project shows relocating the birds is a viable and productive step towards helping their population recover in the state. View the full article
  7. Animals that do well in urban areas tend to be the ones that learn to make use of resources such as the food humans throw away. But is our food actually good for them? A new study suggests that a diet of human foods such as discarded cheeseburgers might be giving American crows living in urban areas higher blood cholesterol levels than their rural cousins. View the full article
  8. Scientists have recovered the first genetic data from an extinct bird in the Caribbean, thanks to the remarkably preserved bones of a Creighton's caracara from a flooded sinkhole on Great Abaco Island. View the full article
  9. A new species of giant penguin -- about 1.6 metres tall -- has been identified from fossils found in Waipara, North Canterbury in New Zealand. View the full article
  10. Analysis shows that while national-level economic growth and social development -- including more women in government -- are associated with more abundant wildlife, growing human populations are linked to wildlife decline. View the full article
  11. When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new study reveals. The findings could help conservationists better predict the risk of extinction faced by endangered species. View the full article
  12. Scientists show that conservation and construction decisions should rely on multiple approaches to determine waterbird 'hotspots,' not just on one analysis method as is often done. View the full article
  13. A biologist conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. View the full article
  14. A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) -- as revealed in a new study. View the full article
  15. For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. Some choices are driven by the farmers' traditional courtship rituals; others are guided by more mundane concerns, such as taste and disease resistance. The result is the development of a genetically distinct African chicken -- one with longer, meatier legs, according to new research . But that 3,000-year-old local breed type is threatened by the introduction of commercial cluckers. View the full article
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