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  2. Description: We are seeking 1-2 highly motivated field technicians to assist with a project examining nesting ecology of endangered and threatened marsh birds in Illinois. Due to the inherently secretive nature of these birds, little is known about their distribution, habitat use, and reproductive success. We are examining the effects of wetland management on nest site selection, nest success, and nest predation. Field work will involve early mornings and potentially long days in the hot humid Illinois summer with biting insects. Technicians will be expected to search for nests by wading through dense wetland vegetation. Responsibilities may include searching for nests, deploying and reviewing data from nest cameras, handling birds and affixing transmitters, tracking birds using radio telemetry, sampling vegetation, and data entry. Housing and field vehicles will be provided. The season will start in early May and continue through August, with start and end dates being somewhat flexible. Qualifications: Candidates must have a valid driver’s license and be physically fit to wade through dense marsh habitat. Candidates with an interest in avian ecology and are working towards or have completed a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Ecology or a related field are encouraged to apply. Preference will be given to candidates who have familiarity with marsh birds, experience searching for and monitoring nests, tracking via radio telemetry, and working in wetlands. The successful applicants will be self-motivated, able to work alone and with a team in the field, possess good communication skills, and have a desire to learn and adapt to challenges faced in the field. Contact Person: Please send a brief cover letter listing your interest and qualifications, a CV, and the names, email addresses, and phone numbers of 3 professional references as a single PDF to Stephanie Schmidt (sms11@illinois.edu) with your name and “2020 Marsh Bird Technician” in the subject line. Applications will be reviewed as they are received until a successful applicant is found.
  3. Last week
  4. Klamath Bird Observatory (www.klamathbird.org) is seeking to fill a Field Technician position in our Oregon Vesper Sparrow demography research program. We are contributing to a range-wide study to understand causes of decline in this imperiled subspecies. Primary duties will include nest searching and monitoring, color-band resighting, and vegetation surveys in meadows of the western Cascades mountains and associated data entry based out of our office in Ashland, Oregon. EXPECTATIONS: Field season will be ~May 4 - July 17, 2020 (exact dates to be determined). Primary duties will be nest searching and monitoring, color-band resighting, vegetation surveys, and data entry. Previous nest-searching experience is required, and additional experience in the other methods is preferred. Training in specific field protocols will be provided. Ability to use your own vehicle (typically on paved or improved dirt roads; 4WD is not necessary), and willingness to camp for the duration of the field season will be needed. We can provide suggestions for free rustic camping options near field sites. QUALIFICATIONS: Previous nest-searching experience and ability to see full range of colors are required, and experience searching for grassland bird nests using parental behavior is preferred. Applicants should be prepared to start at dawn, work in the field in all types of weather, carefully follow protocols and meticulously record data, be in good physical condition, and possess good communication skills. Applicants must enjoy the outdoors, and be willing to work in areas with biting insects and the potential to encounter rattlesnakes, black bears, and cougars. It is essential that the applicant be comfortable and capable of camping and working independently at remote sites (but near country roads, and within a 40-min. drive of Ashland, OR). COMPENSATION: The Field Technician will be paid $13.77/hr., not to exceed 40 hrs/wk. Transportation to Ashland, OR, and personal field gear (e.g. tent, other camping gear, hiking boots) are the responsibility of the applicant. Applicants must have a car, valid driver’s license, current insurance, and be able to provide their driving record. Use of a personal vehicle for work purposes will be necessary, and the Field Technician will be reimbursed for work-related mileage at $0.575/mile. TO APPLY: Send cover letter including your dates of availability and vehicle type, résumé, and contact info for 3 references by email to Dr. Sarah Rockwell (smr@klamathbird.org). We will review applications on a rolling basis starting on February 17, 2020, and continue until the position is filled.
  5. Job Description The successful applicant’s primary responsibilities will be to monitor peregrine falcon and bald eagle nests throughout Western North Carolina. Together with the project biologist or primary wildlife technician, but more often alone, the technician will check peregrine falcon nests to determine if a site is occupied by falcons, assess stage of the nesting cycle, note behaviors and disturbance factors, and ultimately determine number of offspring produced. Eagle nest monitoring will be less intensive. The technician will enter data, coordinate and supervise volunteers, maintain equipment, and complete miscellaneous tasks in support of project objectives. As needed, applicant will assist with inventory, monitoring, and management of other bird Species of Greatest Conservation Need identified in the North Carolina Wildlife Action Plan (2015). As needed and feasible, the technician may be asked to assist other regional biologists or technicians with field work for other wildlife taxa. Technicians must be able to work independently in remote, strenuous field locations, sometimes in harsh conditions or inclement weather. Travel to various field locations throughout the western region and occasional overnight stays will be required. The applicant can expect long hours of driving around western North Carolina, primarily on highways and secondary roads with limited driving on rough dirt roads. Optics equipment and a vehicle will be provided. A valid driver’s license is required. The applicant must be comfortable with heights and working along tops of cliffs and rock outcrops. However, climbing skills are not necessary. Location The expected duty station will be in or near Asheville, North Carolina, but other nearby locations may be considered. Housing is not provided. Office work will be conducted in your home. Compensation This is a three month (mid-March to mid-June) temporary position. The technician can work up to 40 hours per week. Weather conditions that preclude field work may impact the total weekly hours. Non-field tasks will be assigned depending on availability, project need, and applicant’s skills. Pay: $12.50 - $15.05/hr. Pay Rate will be set commensurate with education and experience of candidate. Work with the project biologist will be Monday-Friday. However, the applicant may work independently on any day of the week. The applicant should expect a variable schedule with occasional nights, weekends, and long hours required, depending on the nest site visited. Weather conditions greatly influence the technician’s field work schedule for this position. Qualifications An Associate’s degree in Wildlife Biology or related field is required; a Bachelor’s degree or higher is preferred. Desired qualifications include the following: the ability to correctly identify Western North Carolina birds, particularly raptors; experience observing raptor behavior, particularly peregrine falcon; experience monitoring raptor nests; experience using a spotting scope and binoculars; experience navigating with map and compass and using a GPS unit; proficiency in Microsoft Word; ability to enter data in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access; ability to make a map in ArcMap; ability to hike or backpack long distances on and off trail, often on rugged, steep slopes; ability to carry and/or lift heavy loads (at least 50 lbs.); familiarity with the Western North Carolina region. Prior experience working with peregrine falcons is preferred. Other skills considered a bonus include ability to identify Western North Carolina birds by sight and sound. Good organizational skills, attention to detail, patience during long, slow hours observing a nest site, excellent verbal and written communications skills and personal motivation are a must. The successful applicant will be a team player, mature, trustworthy, and respectful of others. This position emphasizes field work and requires organized planning with respect to suitable weather conditions for nest monitoring. Applications Complete the PD-107 Application for Employment for the State of North Carolina and, if more space is needed, complete the PD-107A continuation sheet: (https://oshr.nc.gov/documents/nc-state-government-paper-application-employment-pd-107). Email a cover letter, resume or C.V., 3 references, and the completed PD-107 and PD-107A to: Chris Kelly Wildlife Diversity Biologist North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Email: christine.kelly@ncwildlife.org In the subject line of the email, put: WNC avian tech Deadline Applications must be received by 5 pm on February 1, 2020. Selected interviews will occur approximately 1-2 weeks later.
  6. St. Paul Island Tour, LLC is recruiting for the position of Tour Guide. This is a Seasonal position and is located on St. Paul Island, AK. This position reports to the Tour Director. Discover one of the world's last wild places Imagine traveling all the way to Alaska, then going even farther... to a small, windswept island in the Bering Sea. St. Paul Island is raw and rich with wildlife, especially birds. When you journey here, you leave the crush of tourists and souvenir shops behind. What you'll find instead is authentic Aleut culture, wide-open spaces and the breathtaking beauty of nature. For more information, visit https://stpaulislandtour.com/. JOB SUMMARY: The tour guides are responsible for visitor management, public relations, and interpretive services for the visiting public. Responsible for conducting guided tours of St. Paul Island and the management and escorting of the tour groups. Heavy emphasis is on public relations and interpretive services covering the ecology and history of the island. Interpretive themes typically center on birds, marine mammals, and Aleut history. Under the Tour Director’s guidance tour guides make decisions concerning the daily scheduling of tour vehicles and participants based upon specific visitor requests and expectations. Applicants must be willing to work in adverse weather conditions in a remote location. Normal conditions are overcast with drizzle, rain, or fog and an average high temperature during the summer of only 50 F. St. Paul Island is located over 750 miles from Anchorage within the Pribilof Islands and is only accessible by semi-weekly flights. ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Communicate and interpret to the visitor(s) in a pleasant and informative manner information on the wildlife, natural history and cultural history of St. Paul Island. Provide exemplary customer service on a daily basis. Work cooperatively with the Tour Director, other tour guides, the Hotel Manager and other TDX Corporation staff to give the best possible tour for the visitor(s). Guides are often an informal liaison between tourists, the tour program and local residents. Educate the visitor(s) on the delicate balance of the Bering Sea ecosystem, the fragile nature of the tundra, and the rich culture of the Aleut people, in a manner that is non-political and responsible. Conduct both driving and walking tours of the island, especially to seal and sea bird rookeries. Many times such tours will occur during inclement weather. Lead tours to search for vagrant and accidental species of birds both for organized birding groups and independent birdwatchers of varying interest, expectations and abilities. Lead tours for groups of cruise ship passengers, Elderhostel participants, VIP’s and other special trips. Tour guides are required to extensively read and research the major themes and topics of this tour. They should be prepared to spend at least some free time birding, botanizing and “naturalizing” in the field. Assist Tour Director with various special projects and clerical duties designed to improve tour programs, as well as with all aspects related to visitor services. These duties may include cleaning tour vehicles and buildings, picking up garbage, and lifting up to 50lbs. Tour guides are to drive a 22-passenger bus and be responsible for fueling and cleaning the bus, including regular upkeep of portable style “heads”. Occasionally light maintenance of these buses will be required. Defensive driving and safe operation of vehicles is required. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Two years college education in natural science or the equivalent in work experience, familiarity with Pribilof flora, fauna and history and/or a demonstrated ability to quickly learn and be comfortable explaining these subjects to groups of up to 40 people. Preference will be given to persons with strong birding skills and experience, knowledge of marine ecosystems, and those who can speak and/or write European languages. Ability to identify difficult groups of birds, including those in immature and juvenile plumage such as: gulls, shorebirds and Asiatic vagrants. Ability to scan bodies of water, shorelines and tundra and identify bird species in cryptic plumage. Strong communication, interpretive and people skills and willingness to work intensively with a diversity of people under difficult conditions is essential. Guides must have strong people skills. The ability to work independently with a minimum of supervision. The ability to live and work cooperatively and cheerfully with others from many different backgrounds with different abilities. Valid driver’s license required with a good driving record. Must be 21 years of age or older. Willingness to work up to seven days a week and long hours required, especially at the peak of tour season. The ability to work and function and maintain a sense of humor in adverse weather conditions. Guides should be in good physical condition. Must supply your own optics (binoculars and spotting scope) and rain gear. LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: TDX Corporation will provide housing, meals, and transportation to and from St. Paul. Housing is dormitory style and will be shared with other tour guides. EXPECTATION FOR ALL TDX EMPLOYEES: Support the organization's mission, vision, and values by exhibiting excellence, competence, collaboration, innovation, respect, personal accountability, and commitment to our community. COMPETENCIES: To perform the job successfully, an individual should demonstrate the following competencies to perform the essential functions of this position: Knowledge and experience in various employment laws and practices. Good organization and time management skills. Demonstrated ability to serve as a successful participant in working with management team. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to work independently on assigned tasks as well as to accept direction on given assignments. Able to work collectively with the HR team associates, working through chain of command. Able to multi-task. Evidence of the practice of confidentiality and securing of sensitive information. NOTES: This job description in no way states or implies that these are the only duties to be performed by this employee. This employee will be required to follow any other instructions and to perform any other duties requested by their supervisor. The statements herein intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by the employee in this position. These statements are not to be construed as an exhaustive list of responsibilities, duties, and skills required of a person in this position. Furthermore, these statements do not establish a contract for employment and are subject to change at the discretion of Tanadgusix Corporation (TDX) and its subsidiaries. Equal Opportunity Employer/Shareholder Preference St. Paul Island Tour, LLC is a subsidiary of TDX and is an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action (EEO/AA) employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, veteran protected status or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. Native Preference applies pursuant to P.L. 93-638, and St. Paul Island Tour grants employment preference to shareholders of Tanadgusix Corporation and their spouses and descendants to the extent allowed by law. Prior to employment, successful completion of a background investigation may be required. Accommodation Request If you are a job seeker with a disability and require accessibility assistance or an accommodation to apply for one of our jobs, please submit a request by telephone or via email. In order to appropriately assist you with an accommodation, we ask that you please specify the assistance needed in order to access our jobsite and post for a position. The dedicated email and telephonic options are listed below and are reserved only for individuals with disabilities needing accessibility assistance. To request an accommodation, contact an HR representative at (907) 278-2312 or at HR@TDXCorp.com. To apply, please follow the link: https://tdxcorp.bamboohr.com/jobs/view.php?id=338 For any questions, please contact Sulli Gibson at wgibson@stpaulislandtour.com
  7. APPLY ONLINE ONLY AT: https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/4310/south-pinellas-county-anchor-steward/job Position Summary Audubon Florida supports management of beach-nesting birds at many locations on the Gulf Coast and Northeast Atlantic Coast of Florida by surveying, posting, stewarding and protecting nesting areas from disturbance. To better monitor and protect the nesting shorebirds along beaches and other nest sites Audubon is hiring a seasonal Beach Anchor Steward to work at beach-nesting bird sites within Pinellas County, Florida. Sites most likely requiring stewardship include Fort De Soto County Park and St. Petersburg Beach. Nesting species may include American Oystercatcher, Wilson’s Plover, Least Tern, and Black Skimmer. The primary responsibility of the Anchor Steward is to organize and train volunteers in order to help monitor nesting birds and to conduct public outreach around the shore/seabird nesting areas. This is a part-time, 20 hour per week, seasonal position focused on weekend days and holidays, including Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day, if nesting persists until the latter holiday. The position is expected to begin on March 9, 2020 and continue through the end of nesting season, to be determined in consultation with supervisor. Nesting may persist into August or early September but can end early in the event of a catastrophic event or other total loss of nesting activity. Essential Functions Under the direction of Audubon’s Project Manager for Bird Stewardship, the South Pinellas County Anchor Steward will be responsible for the following tasks: Monitor nesting birds and conduct minimum weekly counts of nests, chicks, and fledged young of each nesting species and enter/report data in the Florida Shorebird Database as directed by the supervisor. Assist site managers and Audubon staff with installing symbolic fencing around new nest areas as needed. Conduct public outreach at nesting beaches on weekends and holidays generally between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Hours may run longer or be changed as needed, and is anticipated on holiday weekends. Assist with recruiting volunteers; train and schedule volunteers to chaperone nesting birds and conduct public outreach at nesting beaches on weekends and holidays. Work closely with site managers and Audubon staff, external partners, and volunteers in a positive and professional manner at all times. Qualifications and Experience Experience and ability with verbal communication. Experience and ability with record-keeping and summarizing data for grant-required reports. Ability to recruit, train, support and schedule volunteers. Work well independently and with other staff and volunteers. A positive and diplomatic attitude is a must. Demonstrated capability of physically active work walking on sandy beaches carrying field equipment during Florida summer field conditions. Ability to lift 30 lbs. Must have a valid driver's license and a personal vehicle suited for transportation to complete assigned tasks. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Familiarity with Pinellas County beaches preferred. Previous experience with monitoring and stewardship for one shore/seabird nesting season strongly preferred, but similar experience will be considered. Interest in conservation and passion for the mission of the National Audubon Society a must.
  8. APPLY ONLINE ONLY AT: https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/4309/sarasota-seasonal-bird-stewardship-coordinator/job Position Summary Audubon Florida seeks a Seasonal Stewardship Coordinator to support beach-nesting bird conservation work in Sarasota County. The Coordinator will work on beaches throughout Sarasota County, a shoreline distance of about 37 miles, but predominantly in the central and northern portions of the county where shorebirds and seabirds have nested historically. From March to August (“breeding season”), the Coordinator will be responsible for performing bird monitoring and protection work under Audubon’s “Restoring Florida's Shorebird & Seabird Populations” Contract. This project performs a spectrum of independent, beach-nesting bird conservation tasks with responsibilities that include the following, in addition to other as-needed duties: Posting symbolic fencing around beach-nesting bird sites and maintaining said posting. Monitoring nest sites 2-4 times weekly or more often for evidence of disturbance or predation. Performing weekly or more frequent bird surveys including number of adult pairs of shore/seabirds, number of downy chicks, number of feathered chicks, and number of fledged young; and Helping protect sites from disturbance through stewardship activities, to include: coordinating with municipal staff or landowners to minimize disturbance, recruiting and training new volunteers, advising and partnering with volunteers to chaperone beach-nesting bird colonies during busy warm-weather weekends, educating beachgoers about these species and encouraging compliance with posted areas, and engaging in outreach to user groups through presentations at organizational meetings. This is a seasonal, full-time, grant-funded position for 29 weeks from approximately March 9th – to the end of August 2020. This position also will be funded in 2020; funding may be available in subsequent years. Essential Functions By closely collaborating with the Project Manager for Pinellas/Sarasota Bird Stewardship, s/he will ensure: All Sarasota County beaches are effectively surveyed during the state-prescribed beach-nesting bird survey windows. Bird survey data is entered into the Florida Shorebird Database weekly. All active nesting sites are monitored and surveyed weekly or more often, and stewarded as appropriate (to be determined in consultation with the Project Manager). Additional responsibilities include: Collecting accurate data as assigned, and submitting associated activity logs on a scheduled timeline. Contributing to technical report writing and submitting content for the program. Mentoring and advising volunteers in monitoring, surveying and stewardship activities. Educating and engaging the public around coastal bird conservation through outreach at beach sites. Cooperation with Audubon partners, including but not limited to: Sarasota County Audubon leaders and volunteers, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologists and law enforcement officers, Sarasota County staff, and Longboat Key municipal staff as needed. Qualifications and Experience Bachelor’s degree in biology, wildlife ecology or related field required; Master's degree a plus. 2-3 years' demonstrated expertise in shorebird and seabird identification and performing bird surveys a must. Strong interpersonal communication and problem solving skills; demonstrated ability to work independently with minimal supervision and to maintain accountability for work products. Excellent judgment and decision-making skills, one who possesses a high degree of integrity in all deliverables. Demonstrated experience working with external partners and volunteers. Demonstrated capability of physically active work installing posts and signs and walking up to 4 miles on coastal beaches to perform bird surveys and monitoring. Experience with trail cameras a plus. Familiarity with coastal conservation lands of Sarasota County a plus. Must have a valid Florida driver’s license and a personal vehicle suited for transportation to complete assigned tasks. Must be able to work long days, weekends, and holidays as needed, in Florida summer field conditions. Interest in conservation and passion for the mission of the National Audubon Society a must.
  9. (3) Field Technicians needed for a study investigating the breeding ecology of songbirds in shrubland habitats of Eastern Illinois. Work will primarily involve finding and monitoring nests of focal species (Field Sparrow, Brown Thrasher, Common Yellowthroat, Indigo Bunting, and Gray Catbird) and other common songbird species (e.g. Red-winged Blackbird, Eastern Phoebe, Chipping Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Blue-winged Warbler, Blue Grosbeak, American Robin, Yellow-breasted Chat, Blue Jay, Eastern Towhee, and others), and monitoring nest boxes (Eastern Bluebird, Carolina Chickadee, Tree Swallow, House Wren). Technicians will also assist graduate students with sampling egg physiology (measuring heartbeat rate, incubation temperature), the capture and banding of adult and nestling birds, and deploying sound recorders and nest cameras. Technicians may also have opportunities to help out (once a week until the end of spring migration) on a newly created mist netting station run by researchers from Illinois Natural History Survey. Technicians will have to find t heir own housing (cheap options available in Champaign-Urbana), but travel to and from sites will be provided. Rate of pay: ~10.50-12.50$/per hour. Positions run from April 20th to July 31st (end dates flexible) Applicants must be willing to work long hours outside, moving through dense (thorny/spiny/ticks/poison ivy) vegetation under a variety of physically demanding field conditions (sunny, hot, humid, windy, wet, chilly). Ideal candidates will be energetic, hard-working, team players that pay close attention to directions and details while conducting research in the field and entering collected data. Applicants must have a valid driver’s license. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in finding and monitoring songbird nests. To Apply: Please send application (cover letter, cv/resume, and information of three references) via email in ONE PDF FILE (please name file in the following format: firstname_lastname_Songbird _Application) to Todd Jones (preferred email: toddmj AT illinois.edu), Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Turner Hall, Urbana, IL 61801.
  10. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. On 23 Jan 2020, the Ornithological Council learned of an extreme staffing shortage in the USFWS Region 8 permitting office, via an auto-reply to an e-mail: Your message has been received. Thank you! You have contacted the Migratory Bird Permit Office in Region Eight. Our Office supports California and Nevada. If you do not reside in one of these locations, please contact the appropriate region (please cc us so we know.) Our office is currently very short-staffed and is experiencing a backlog of one year with processing permits and mail. Do not follow up with a hard copy unless asked to do so or if you are sending a processing fee through the mail. The only way we can accept processing fees is with a hard copy check or money order payable to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Reports – if you are submitting a report, no further action is needed. Applications – if you are submitting an application. No further action is needed; however, we do recommend following up with our office if you have not heard from us after 6 months. Questions – if you have a question, a response may require research and time. We appreciate your patience and will respond to your inquiry at our earliest opportunity. This problem has occurred before. It was resolved, at least in part, by having some of the pending permit applications sent out to other regions. However, it is rather doubtful that other regions are in good shape at this point. The Ornithological Council has implored USFWS Director Aurelia Skipwith to immediately hire more permitting staff in all regions.
  11. Founded in 2002, Cloudbridge Nature Reserve is a private, non-profit cloudforest reserve in the Talamanca mountains of Costa Rica. Beginning with the purchase of degraded farmland, Cloudbridge has been actively reforesting the area in order to connect the forests of the Cerro Chirripó National Park with adjacent nature reserves and forested areas. Beyond reforestation work, Cloudbridge is also committed to environmental education and conducting research on the unique and diverse cloudforest ecosystem. Cloudbridge Nature Reserve is looking for research interns to conduct bird point count and walking surveys for our ongoing bird monitoring study to start in late May/early June 2020. Start dates later in late August/early September 2020 also available. Positions last a minimum of 11 weeks. A stipend of $2 USD/day is provided to help cover accommodation costs. Training and guidance will be provided. Interns stay in one of our dormitories and share kitchen and living spaces with our other interns and volunteers. Dorms rooms cost $17 USD/night ($15 USD/night with the stipend). Some private rooms with queen beds may be available (subject to current occupancy) for an additional fee. Food costs and cooking are the responsibility of the intern. A basic vegetarian diet typically costs around $4-6 USD per day. Duties and Responsibilities · Learn how to accurately ID, by sight, the 300 species of birds found in the reserve and pass a bird identification test within the first 2-3 weeks of arrival (study materials provided prior to arrival and onsite training provided), · Conduct point count and walking surveys in accordance with Cloudbridge’s Bird Survey Protocol under the direction of the Reserve Manager and Scientific Coordinator, · Enter survey data into the bird survey database, · Summarize collected data into a data report (report template and training provided) and give a presentation on the results, · Greet visitors at the Welcome Centre (rota shared between all volunteers and interns), · Perform required cleaning duties in shared living areas, and, · Participate in reserve activities and community events. Qualifications · Keen interest in birds and birding; preference given to those with previous field identification experience (recreational experience accepted). · Schooling in ornithology, biology, wildlife or related studies; relevant work experience; and/or recreational birding experience. · Physically fit and able to hike 5-8 hours a day, 5 days a week in steep, high-altitude terrain. · Experience with Microsoft Excel an asset. · First aid training an asset. · Good English communication skills; ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing. Ability to communicate in Spanish an asset. · Must be able to commit to 11 weeks. · Minimum 18 years of age. · Able to pay for your accommodation for the duration of your stay ($17 US/night). · Able to pay the $200 USD good faith fee upon acceptance. This fee is credited towards the last two weeks of your accommodation fees. Skills/Abilities · Ability to work in a small team. · Excellent interpersonal skills, ability to develop and maintain good relationships with others in a communal living environment. · Excellent attention to detail and adherence to survey protocols. · Ability to adhere to a survey schedule. · Ability to persevere and maintain quality work in difficult environmental and physically demanding conditions. · Demonstrate good judgement and common sense in a wilderness environment. Locations/Working Conditions · Position is located in the montane cloudforest of the Talamanca mountains of Costa Rica, adjacent to Cerro Chirripó National Park. · Survey trails are steep and at times difficult and narrow. · Altitudes range between 1550 m (5085 ft) and 2200 m (7220 ft). · Work hours typically between 4:30 am and 12:30 pm, 5 days a week; some variation depending on survey route and survey type. · Required to work outdoors under varying weather conditions. Physical Requirements · Able and willing to hike 5-8 hours per day, 5 days a week, in steep and difficult terrain. · Able to work outdoors under varying weather conditions. To learn more about Cloudbridge, please visit our website at www.cloudbridge.org and check out the Volunteer/Research section (http://cloudbridge.org/volunteering/) for more detailed information on the research intern program. To apply, please submit your CV and two references, along with a brief cover letter to Jennifer Powell at jenn.powell@cloudbridge.org. In the cover letter, indicate you are applying for the Tropical Bird Monitoring Intern position, state your preferred start date, and how long you would be available.
  12. We are seeking keen migration monitoring assistants for both of our spring (April 29-June 8 ) and autumn (July 28-October 31) seasons. Tasks required involve banding, extracting, making formal observations, data recording and input, and basic station chores in a remote setting on the north shore of Lake Superior. Qualifications necessary are to have basic knowledge and identification by sight and sound of many eastern North American avian species. Overseas applicants with other experience are welcome. When time allows training is provided. Above all, enthusiasm, stamina, and consistency is anticipated for the duration of your stay. Long-term Volunteers (3 or more weeks) have food and accommodation provided in a communal setting at the station. Shorter term Volunteers are charged a daily fee of CDN $17.50. A simple application form is found at http://www.tbfn.net/how-to-volunteer Please send to Rinchen Boardman at arbyboardman@gmail.com Many thanks.
  13. Position: Collision Monitoring Technician Employer: Oklahoma State University Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma Category: Temporary/Seasonal Last date to apply: 1 March 2020 Start date: 1 April 2020 End date: 31 Oct 2020 Description: Bird-window collisions are one of the top sources of direct human-related avian mortality. Collisions occur when birds are unable to perceive glass as a barrier due to its transparent and reflective qualities. Multiple mitigation techniques exist to reduce bird-window collisions, including the use of window markers which reduce glass surface reflection and alert birds that windows are barriers. Our research project is investigating the effectiveness of window markers for deterring bird-window collisions at glass-walled bus shelters in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Primary duties for this field technician position will be conducting daily surveys for window-killed bird carcasses and collision evidence at bus shelters throughout Stillwater. Secondary duties will include data entry and management, collecting human disturbance data at bus shelters, conducting bird point count surveys at bus shelters, and assisting with other minor tasks as needed. Duties may change as the season progresses and there may be time for the technician to develop a mentored side research project related to the issue of bird collisions. This is a full-time position (30-40 hours/week) that will last for 7 months (1 April – 31 October). There is some flexibility with the start and end dates. Salary is $10/hour (up to ~1,760/mo). Housing is not provided. Working conditions will vary with season with the possibility of heavy rains in the spring and humid heat in the summer. Qualifications: Minimum qualifications include ability to identify common birds found in Oklahoma by sight and sound, ability to work independently in field and office setting, an interest in conservation and ecology, and a strong work ethic. Preferred qualifications include experience surveying for bird carcasses, handling dead and live birds, and using Microsoft Office applications. Candidate must have own car to conduct fieldwork. Mileage will be reimbursed. Application: To apply, send a single document (PDF preferred) containing a cover letter, resume, and contact information for at least 3 references to Georgia Riggs (georgia.riggs@okstate.edu) by 1 March 2020. Contact information: Georgia Riggs Georgia.riggs@okstate.edu
  14. Job Type: Full Time Summer Position. Term: Tentatively May 1 to September 30, 2020 with possibility of extension. Wage: $3250 to 3500 per month based on experience and qualifications. Job Description The Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory (LSLBO) is located in the Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, approximately 20km north of Slave Lake, Alberta. During our spring and fall migration monitoring programs, we operate 12 standard mist-nets and 2 aerial nets. In the summer, we operate 4 MAPS stations and may be performing breeding bird surveys in remote locations. We are looking for one hard-working, enthusiastic, detail-orientated individual to assist with our long-term avian monitoring programs including visual counts and songbird banding. Experience working with mist-nets, identifying, aging, and sexing songbirds in the hand, and identifying boreal birds in the field by sight and sound is required. Daily duties include setting up the station early each morning, conducting visual counts, extracting and banding birds, training and managing volunteers and assistants, data recording, tabulating daily totals, completing the daily log, and data entry. Additional duties include equipment upkeep, trail maintenance, and demonstrating bird banding to the public. Successful candidates may be expected to work long days, including weekends and holidays and must be flexible with schedule changes. If the candidate possesses or can obtain a permit to band Northern Saw-whet Owls using mist-nets, the contract may be extended until mid to late October. Seasonal staff accommodation is available at the Boreal Centre for Bird Conservation at a cost of $295/month. More information on the LSLBO is available at www.lslbo.org . Requirements · Possess or be eligible to obtain a Canadian Scientific Permit to Capture and Band Migratory Birds (Passerines and other landbirds). · Exceptional identification skills of the birds of northern Alberta by sight and sound. · Detail-oriented with excellent field data recording and data entry skills (Microsoft Office). · Safety conscience and bear aware. · Physically capable to work long hours on your feet with lots of walking; including hiking through rough terrain in heavily forested areas using maps and GPS. · Work early mornings in poor weather conditions and tolerate biting insects. · Proven leadership and interpersonal skills. · Valid Class 5 driver’s license. · Standard First Aid and CPR Certificate prior to commencement. To apply, please send your cover letter and resume to: Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory Box 1076, Slave Lake, AB T0G 2A0 Email:info@lslbo.org or Fax: 780-849-8239 Open until filled, final deadline for applications is 4:30 pm MST, Feb 15, 2020.
  15. Queen's University researchers John Smol and Matthew Duda have identified concerning trends in a vulnerable seabird. View the full article
  16. Expenses paid field assistant position to study the breeding ecology in the long-tailed finch hybrid zone in the Kimberley region of Australia, March-June 2020 For the upcoming field season (~8 March to mid-late June 2020) I am looking for an expenses-paid field assistant for my PhD project studying breeding behaviour of long-tailed finches in their genetic hybrid zone. The Kimberley is an iconic but challenging area in the northern tropical savanna of Western Australia – it consistently reaches very high temperatures, but has amazing local wildlife, including rich and unique birdlife, and beautiful landscapes. We are interested in the breeding behaviour and patterns where the two subspecies of long-tailed finch come into contact and will be monitoring breeding in nest-boxes set up around Kununurra township. We will collect an array of data, including banding adults and chicks, collecting blood and sperm samples, measuring body morphology and bill colour, recording songs, and possibly performing some behavioural experiments. The work will be demanding, requiring long hours spent outside often in the heat, precision in handling birds and recording data, and ability to work in a close-knit team. We can provide training for the most crucial procedures, but bird handling experience or previous field experience would be highly valuable. That said, enthusiasm and a positive attitude are the most important attributes someone could bring to the team. We will alternate between staying in a caravan park in town or in a national park close by. The costs for accommodation and travel around the field site will be paid for, as well as domestic travel to the field site – if you would be travelling from further afield, we can discuss possibilities on a case by case basis. Applications should include a CV, a short letter of motivation (1/2 A4 page) and the name of two referees and can be sent to Callum McDiarmid at callum.mcdiarmid@hdr.mq.edu.au, and will reviewed as they are received, until the position is filled. Please do not hesitate to email through any further questions. Callum McDiarmid (callum.mcdiarmid@hdr.mq.edu.au)
  17. Three crew leads are needed to oversee and undertake field work conducting surveys for California spotted owls and barred owls in the northern Sierra Nevada, California. The position begins late April to early May, and will last until late-August. Pay is $16.50-$18.50/hour depending on experience. All members of the crew will deploy and retrieve autonomous recording units (ARUs), enter and analyze acoustic data, and perform routine maintenance of field equipment. A typical workweek is 35 hours. Field housing will be provided, but frequent camping is required during the week. Schedules will be irregular, but a typical week often consists of 2-3 days in the field, 1-2 days of office work and 2-3 days off. Much of the work will be solitary, but group work and cooperative living will also be required. Crew leads will be responsible for overseeing and scheduling work for technicians. They will also be responsible for keeping track of maintenance issues and working with the project manager to share data with partner organizations. The recent expansion of barred owls into the western US has had dramatic negative consequences for northern spotted owl populations. Barred owls are now increasing in abundance in the Sierra Nevada, the core range of the California spotted owl. This project will provide information vital to the successful management of both species at broad spatial scales in California. Must be physically capable of hiking moderate distances (typically under 0.25 mile) multiple times throughout the day. Additionally, must be capable of removing brush and other debris using hands and hand tools (provided) Must be able to drive highways and forest service roads, as well as hike off trail, alone, using a map and GPS (provided) Must be comfortable with the possibility of camping alone at night and having little to no interactions during the day for a few days at a time Must be able to follow detailed field protocols without supervision. Must have legible handwriting and able to enter data into computers without error Safe operation of a 4WD vehicle on unmaintained roads, and excellent judgement of when project protocols must be modified for safety reasons Basic first aid, ability to safely operate basic hand tools Hiring is contingent upon approval by the University of Wisconsin to drive a University vehicle Experience overseeing field crews an asset, but not required Applicants should submit resume, cover letter and CV at https://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/en-us/job/503995/wildlife-technician-crew-lead. Questions can be referred to Kevin Kelly at kkelly29[AT]wisc.edu
  18. Thirteen field technicians are needed to undertake field work conducting surveys for California spotted owls and barred owls in the northern Sierra Nevada, California. The position begins early May, and will last until mid- to late-August. Pay is $14.18-$16.00/hour depending on experience. All members of the crew will deploy and retrieve autonomous recording units (ARUs), enter and analyze acoustic data, and perform routine maintenance of field equipment. A typical workweek is 35 hours. Field housing will be provided, but frequent camping is required during the week. Schedules will be irregular, but a typical week often consists of 2-3 days in the field, 1-2 days of office work and 2-3 days off. Much of the work will be solitary, but group work and cooperative living will also be required. The recent expansion of barred owls into the western US has had dramatic negative consequences for northern spotted owl populations. Barred owls are now increasing in abundance in the Sierra Nevada, the core range of the California spotted owl. This project will provide information vital to the successful management of both species at broad spatial scales in California. Must be able to drive highways and forest service roads, as well as hike off trail, alone, using a map and GPS (provided) Must be physically capable of hiking moderate distances (typically under ? mile) multiple times throughout the day. Additionally, must be capable of removing brush and other debris using hands and hand tools (provided) Must be comfortable with the possibility of camping alone at night and having little to no interactions during the day for a few days at a time Must be able to follow detailed field protocols without supervision. Must have legible handwriting and able to enter data into computers without error Safe operation of a 4WD vehicle on unmaintained roads, and excellent judgement of when project protocols must be modified for safety reasons Basic first aid, ability to safely operate basic hand tools Hiring is contingent upon approval by the University of Wisconsin to drive a University vehicle Applicants should submit resume, cover letter and CV at https://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/en-us/job/503994/wildlife-technician. Questions can be referred to Kevin Kelly at kkelly29[AT]wisc.edu
  19. We are looking for 2 individuals who are interested in assisting with field work associated with an ongoing M.S. project examining survival rates and resource selection of northern bobwhites on Apalachicola National Forest. The study site is located right outside of Tallahassee, Florida in the Munson Sandhills. Job responsibilities include radio-tracking bobwhites via VHF telemetry, vegetation sampling, locating nests, assisting with data entry and other duties as assigned by the supervisor. Applicants should be prepared to work in adverse weather conditions (heat, humidity, rain) and around biting insects. In addition, applicants should be comfortable with regular heavy lifting (~50 lbs) and a long, irregular work schedule (some weekend work may be required). We are seeking someone who is independent, but can also work well in a team-setting, motivated and possess a positive attitude. Qualifications: 1. Interested applicants should have a B.S. in wildlife or related field or working toward a B.S. degree 2. An interest in game bird ecology and management 3. Knowledge in Southeastern U.S. plant identification is preferred, but not required 4. Previous field work, telemetry and ATV is preferred, but not required 5. Individuals must have a CLEAN (no points on license) driver’s license and have a good driving record 6. Experience with data entry using Microsoft Excel Benefits: 1. Free housing provided with utilities provided 2. Compensation: $230/week ($920/month) Internship positions are 16 weeks in length. Start and end dates are somewhat flexible. Two openings are available for: April 6 – July 27 and May 4 – August 24. Applicants encouraged to apply early. Positions open until filled. To apply: 1. Submit a 1-page cover letter clearly stating your research interests, career goals, and hobbies, along with earliest and latest dates available to work. 2. Detailed resume with a minimum of three references (please indicate your relationship to each) 3. Combine all documents into a SINGLE PDF file titled “LastName_ANFQuailIntern2020” and email to ssimons2@uga.edu Contact Person: Shelby Simons
  20. JOB ANNOUCEMENT Seasonal Beach-Nesting Bird Monitor Location: Martha’s Vineyard, MA Time Period: May 18th –Aug 18th Hours – Seasonal, full-time including weekends, holidays, and irregular hours Application deadline: 3/2/2020 Position Description: BiodiversityWorks seeks an assistant for our beach-nesting bird program. Responsibilities include: (1) locating, monitoring, and protecting nesting pairs of piping plovers, least terns, American oystercatchers, and black skimmers at ~18 sites, (2) collecting detailed biological data on all nesting pairs, (3) conducting predator management at some sites (4) public outreach and engagement, (6) communicating and coordinating daily with the shorebird coordinator via cell phone and in person, (7) communicating with private landowners and maintaining excellent relationships, (8) working with volunteers and interns (9) recording all monitoring data in field notebooks and electronic databases, (10) creating GIS/Google Earth maps from GPS data, (11) assisting with compilation of data for state census forms and summary reports, (12) participating in weekly meetings and naturalist training program, (13) creating a poster project and participating in our annual fundraising event. Requirements: A strong interest in birds, conservation, and management. Must be at least 18 years of age and working towards or possess a degree in wildlife biology, biology, environmental studies, or related field. Must possess a valid driver’s license, good driving record, and a reliable vehicle. Must be able to walk at least 1 mile in the sand while carrying up to 25 pounds and engage in strenuous outdoor work in summer weather – sometimes amidst biting insects (ticks, mosquitoes, flies). Must be able to work independently and communicate regularly via text message and email on smart phone. Good communication, computer, and organizational skills. Should work well independently or as part of a team. Must be willing to engage in humane box trapping or other capture methods for lethal control of a limited number of skunks and crows at nesting beaches. Desired Qualifications: At least one field season experience working with plovers, terns or oystercatchers. Familiarity with Martha’s Vineyard. Proficiency in using spreadsheets, Google docs, GIS or Google maps. Compensation: $12-$13.50/hour, plus ½ housing costs, cell phone stipend ($25/mo) and mileage reimbursement. Housing is a shared room at The Nature Conservancy Hoft Farm Field Station, ½ = $225/month To Apply: Please email a cover letter (that includes your career goals and dates available), resume, and list of three references to: Liz Olson at: lizb@biodiversityworksmv.org. All applications must be received by midnight on 3/2/20. Applicants will be selected for interviews by 3/13/2020. BiodiversityWorks is an Equal Opportunity Employer
  21. Seeking a highly motivated avian field technician to assist with avian point counts and vegetation surveys from April 28 to July 10 (dates variable) . The data will be collected as part of a research project evaluating Cerulean Warbler, Golden-winged Warbler, and the avian community’s response to Natural Resources Conservation Service conservation projects that implement habitat management on private lands throughout West Virginia. The Regional Conservation Partnership Program Cerulean Warbler Appalachian Forestland Enhancement Project (AFEP) implements forest management to improve Cerulean Warbler habitat on private lands in portions of their Appalachian breeding range. The Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) Golden-winged Warbler Initiative began in 2012 and targets the creation and maintenance of high quality early successional habitats on private lands within Appalachian Golden-winged Warbler breeding range. We are monitoring the effects of AFEP management on Cerulean Warbler and WLFW management on Golden-winged Warbler throughout West Virginia to evaluate the effectiveness of each program at creating, improving, or maintaining habitat for both species, as well as the overall community. This position offers a unique opportunity to gain valuable field experience working with two high priority species for conservation. Fieldwork involves conducting 10-minute morning point count surveys for breeding songbirds and conducting vegetation surveys at point count locations on private properties enrolled in AFEP and/or WLFW throughout West Virginia. The selected applicant will be trained in all survey protocols prior to starting fieldwork. Additional work will include data entry and data proofing. The technician will be working closely and living with the supervisor/graduate student, Lincoln Oliver, throughout the field season but point count surveys will be conducted alone. Fieldwork will require early mornings and considerable travel time. A typical work week will involve working 40+ hours/week (6-8 hours/day) and working on some weekends with days off during inclement weather. Salary will be ~$1,700 - 2,100/month for 2.5 months. Field housing, including bunkhouses, cabins, apartments, and possibly tent camping will be provided and shared with the supervisor. Housing on days off/weekends and a field vehicle will be provided. First aid/CPR training and driver safety training will also be provided at no cost. To apply, please email a cover letter (1 page), resume/CV, and contact information for 3 references as a single document to Lincoln Oliver at lro0005@mix.wvu.edu. The application deadline is February 14, 2020. Interviews will begin as applications from qualified applicants are received. Qualifications: 1. Identify eastern USA birds by sound and sight (required) and avian point count experience (preferred) 2. Earned (or are working towards) a BS in wildlife, natural resources, or a similar field 3. Ability to navigate using GPS and maps in remote areas and in steep terrain 4. Ability and willingness to work independently or as part of a two-person team during early morning fieldwork 5. Valid driver’s license with a clean driving record 6. Comfortable working on private lands and interacting with private landowners 7. Maintain a positive, upbeat attitude while working in challenging field conditions
  22. Founded in 2002, Cloudbridge Nature Reserve is a private, non-profit cloudforest reserve in the Talamanca mountains of Costa Rica. Beginning with the purchase of degraded farmland, Cloudbridge has been actively reforesting the area in order to connect the forests of the Cerro Chirripó National Park with adjacent nature reserves and forested areas. Beyond reforestation work, Cloudbridge is also committed to environmental education and conducting research on the unique and diverse cloudforest ecosystem. Cloudbridge Nature Reserve is looking for a research intern to conduct walking surveys to study mixed species foraging flocks (MSF) to start as soon as possible. MSF are a phenomenon that occurs around the globe, but is particularly present in the neotropics. Bird species have a tendency to flock to reduce predation pressures and increase foraging efficiency. MSF are vulnerable to forest fragmentation and as a result can be a good indicator of forest health. Positions last a minimum of 11 weeks. A stipend of $2 USD/day is provided to help cover accommodation costs. Training and guidance will be provided. Interns stay in one of our dormitories and share kitchen and living spaces with our other interns and volunteers. Dorms rooms cost $17 USD/night ($15 USD/night with the stipend). Some private rooms may be available (subject to current occupancy) for an additional fee. Food costs and cooking are the responsibility of the intern. A basic vegetarian diet typically costs around $4-6 USD per day. Duties and Responsibilities · Learn how to accurately ID, by sight, the 300 species of birds found in the reserve and pass a bird identification test within the first 2-3 weeks of arrival (study materials provided prior to arrival and onsite training provided), · Conduct walking surveys in accordance with provided protocol under the direction of the Bird Studies Lead and Scientific Coordinator, · Enter survey data into a Microsoft Excel database, · Give a presentation on the results at the end of the study period, possible report preparation and data analysis work (depending on skill level), · Greet visitors at the Welcome Centre (rota shared between all volunteers and interns), · Perform required cleaning duties in shared living areas, and, · Participate in reserve activities and community events. Qualifications · Keen interest in birds and birding; preference given to those with previous field identification experience (recreational experience accepted). · Schooling in ornithology, biology, wildlife or related studies, or relevant work experience an asset; preference for avian related experience. · Physically fit and able to hike 5-8 hours a day, 5 days a week in steep, high-altitude terrain. · First aid training and familiarity with Microsoft Excel an asset. · Good English communication skills; ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing. Ability to communicate in Spanish an asset. · Must be able to commit to 11 weeks. · Minimum 18 years of age. · Able to pay for your accommodation for the duration of your stay ($15 US/night). · Able to pay the $200 USD good faith fee upon acceptance. This fee is credited towards the last two weeks of your accommodation fees. Skills/Abilities · Demonstrated ability to work independently. · Excellent interpersonal skills; ability to develop and maintain good relationships with others in a communal living environment. · Excellent attention to detail and adherence to survey protocols. · Strong time management skills. · Ability to persevere and maintain high-quality work in difficult environmental and physically demanding conditions. · Demonstrate good judgement and common sense in a wilderness environment. Locations/Working Conditions · Position is located in the montane cloudforest of the Talamanca mountains of Costa Rica, adjacent to Cerro Chirripó National Park. · Survey trails are steep and at times difficult and narrow. River fording may be required. · Altitudes range between 1550 m (5085 ft) and 2200 m (7220 ft). · Work hours typically between 4:30 am and 12:30 pm, 5 days a week; some variation depending on survey route. · Required to work outdoors under varying weather conditions. Physical Requirements · Able and willing to hike 5-8 hours per day, 5 days a week, in steep and difficult terrain. · Able to work outdoors under varying weather conditions. To learn more about Cloudbridge, please visit our website at www.cloudbridge.org and check out the Volunteer/Research section (http://cloudbridge.org/volunteering/) for more detailed information on the research intern program. To apply, please submit your CV and two references, along with a brief cover letter to Jennifer Powell at jenn.powell@cloudbridge.org. In the cover letter, indicate you are applying for the Mixed Species Foraging Flock position, state when you would be available to start, and for how long you are available.
  23. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. Many, many moons ago, the USDA regulations exempted rats, mice, and birds from the Animal Welfare Regulations. After litigation in 2000, the USDA agreed to change its regulations to include rats, mice, and birds. However, before the USDA could promulgate regulations pertaining to rats, mice, and birds, the U.S. Congress, by way of a provision in the 2002 Farm Bill codified the exclusion of rats, mice, and birds. Unfortunately, a typographical error in the final legislation had the effect of excluding ONLY birds bred for use in research.** The Ornithological Council worked diligently to have the Congress correct this error and nearly succeeded but our efforts were thwarted by a very powerful animal rights organization. The USDA then began working on regulations to implement this new definition for several years. In 2004, the USDA APHIS Animal Care program published an advance notice of public rulemaking, asking for "comments from the public to help determine how we should regulate the care and use of those animals." The OC filed comments, suggesting, among other things, that given the number of wild bird species, the enormous variation among species, and the lack of experience and information pertainingto the keeping of most species in captivity that regulations would necessarily have to be very flexibleand nonspecific. Further, that inspection of field sites was unrealistic at best given that the USDA does not have enough inspectors, much less inspectors knowledgeable in field biology, to inspect field sitesand that it would be unreasonable to expect wildlife biologists to bear the costs of such inspections. Those comments and other information were considered by the USDA when writing the new regulations, which had been expected to be released by the end of 2011. However, at a December 2011 conference on Animal Welfare Act compliance in the context of wildlife biology, organized by OC and the American Society of Mammalogists, USDA officials announced that the proposed regulation, which was still under review within the USDA,would be delayed due to concerns about the ability of the agency to implement the regulation given the need for a very substantial increase in the number of USDA inspectors at a time when agency budgets are shrinking. And then....nothing. Well, since 2013,animal rights groups have tried and failed in bringing lawsuits against the USDA to compel it to promulgate bird-specific regulations. See People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals v. USDA, 797 F.3d 1087, 1091-92 (D.C. Cir. 2015). More recently, two other animal rights groups–the American Anti-Vivisection Society and Avian Welfare Coalition–tried again, arguing that USDA's failure to promulgate bird-specific regulations violated the Administrative Procedure Act ("APA"). The federal district court dismissed their claims, but recently a panel of the D.C. Circuit reversed. Am. Anti-Vivisection Society & Avian Welfare Coalition v. USDA, No. 19-5015 (D.C. Cir. Jan. 10, 2020). The D.C. Circuit panel disagreed with the District Court that the plaintiffs' "unreasonably delayed" claim failed. As the Court explained, to bring an "unreasonably delayed" claim, the groups must "assert that [USDA] failed to take a discrete agency action that it is required to take." Am. Anti-Vivisection Soc'y & Avian Welfare Coalition v. USDA, No. 19-5015 (D.C. Cir. Jan. 10, 2020). The Court found that the groups successfully made such an assertion–that the AWA requires USDA to issue standards governing the humane treatment of birds, and the USDA has conceded that its general, catch-all AWA regulations are inadequate for birds–therefore USDA has failed to take the "discrete action" that it is "required to take": issuing standards to protect birds. Whether the plaintiffs' claim ultimately survives, however, turns on whether the issuance of bird regulations has been "unreasonably delayed." Because that issue was not briefed to the D.C. Circuit, the panel remanded to the district court to consider the issue in the first instance. Even if the USDA eventually writes regulations for birds, such regulations are likely to pertain only to birds studied in captivity. The existing regulations pertaining to other taxa cover topics such as housing, feeding, water, sanitation, transit, and handling. NOTE: ** Lest anyone conclude that the Ornithological Council or its member societies oppose the oversight of wild birds studied in research, we refer you to the introductory material in our Guidelines to the Use of Wild Birds in Research: https://birdnet.org/info-for-ornithologists/guidelines-to-the-use-of-wild-birds-in-research/ and specifically this text: The Ornithological Council believes strongly that birds, both wild and captive-bred, should be treated humanely, both in the laboratory and in research conducted in the wild. It is for this reason that we publish this peer-reviewed Guidelines to the Use of Wild Birds in Research. Our objection to the inclusion of birds in the Animal Welfare Act regulations is based solely on the fact that it is likely to impose additional burdens on research without producing an improvement in the humane treatment of birds, because, as explained below, this research is already regulated under the Health Research Extension Act of 1985, which makes the Animal Act applicable to all vertebrates. We object only to duplicative and potentially conflicting sets of regulations and burdensome procedural compliance, without contributing to the humane treatment of birds in research.
  24. Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide information about the stage of development. But how do you look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs? View the full article
  25. The Wetlands Institute seeks applicants for a temporary, full-time, seasonal Coordinator for our 10-week summer undergraduate research intern program. Located on the Cape May Peninsula of southern New Jersey, The Wetlands Institute promotes research, conservation, and education through a variety of field studies, community-engagement projects, and educational programs. The CCRP Internship Coordinator will work closely with Institute staff to lead six research interns in the development and completion of independent research projects related to our core research and conservation programs, with focus on diamondback terrapins, horseshoe crabs, coastal birds, and coastal and wetland ecosystem dynamics. Primary tasks include: · direct interns in group and individual research projects · oversee and coordinate project schedules, logistics, data management, and quality control · coordinate with Institute staff to develop weekly schedules for multiple project activities · supervise interns and participate in ongoing field studies and outreach activities Additional responsibilities include: · mentor students in the development, completion, and presentation of individual research projects · develop and deliver weekly professional development seminars · promote and demonstrate positive attitude, research ethics, and personnel safety · ensure adherence to protocols and facilitate collection of project data · maintain regular communication with staff, partners, and volunteers · oversee use and maintenance of research equipment · document intern activities through photographs, video, and articles Required qualifications for the position include: · an enthusiasm and strong desire to provide a positive and engaging learning experience for undergraduate students · advanced degree (earned or in progress) in biology, ecology, conservation biology or related field; Ph.D. or M.S. · field research, supervisory, and undergraduate teaching and/or mentorship experience · strong organizational and project management skills · broad knowledge of coastal and wetland habitats and organisms · proficiency in data management and statistical analysis/programs · ability to work long hours, including early mornings, nights, weekends, and holidays, and tolerate variable environmental conditions including heat, humidity, mud, and insects · desired qualifications include: research experience related to the above core research programs, boat operation experience, familiarity with ArcGIS The duration of the position is approximately 12 weeks (mid-May to early August), with some flexibility for start and end dates. Salary is competitive and dependent on experience. Housing is not provided. A valid driver’s license and personal transportation is required. More information about the internship program is available at http://wetlandsinstitute.org/research/ccrp/. Please submit: 1) cover letter detailing interest, qualifications, and availability for position, 2) CV, 3) contact information for three professional references to Sam Collins: scollins@wetlandsinstitute.org. Please include “CCRP Intern Coordinator” in the subject line. Position is open until filled; all applications should be submitted by March 8, 2020. The Wetlands Institute is an Equal Opportunity Employer: We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability, genetic information or any other status protected by law or regulation. It is our intention that all qualified applicants be given equal opportunity and that selection decisions are based on job-related factors.
  26. Salary: ~$2,000/month for 4 months. Housing and a field vehicle provided. Start Date: 04/09/2020 Last Date to Apply: 1/31/2020 (but applications are accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis, so you are encouraged to apply earlier) Description: Seeking a highly motivated avian field technician to assist with game bird surveys from April 15 to May 10, avian point count surveys from May 15 to July 10, and post-breeding bird surveys from July 15 to Aug 15. The data will be collected as part of research on avian use of wildlife openings in the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia. In addition, the point count data will continue a 25-year dataset of breeding bird surveys that is being used to assess long-term changes in avian communities and abundance. Fieldwork entails conducting evening modified singing-ground surveys for American woodcock, morning modified drumming/gobbling surveys for ruffed grouse and wild turkey, 10-minute morning point count surveys for breeding songbirds, and morning transect surveys (and possibly mist-netting surveys) for post-breeding songbirds. All survey protocols will be reviewed before conducting the surveys, but the field technician should have prior experience conducting point counts or identifying birds by sound. Additional work will include deploying autonomous recording units and game cameras, vegetation sampling, data entry, and data proofing. The technician will be working closely with the supervisor, Hannah Clipp, or another technician to access field site locations, but actual game bird and point count surveys will be conducted alone. The technician should expect to work 6–8 hours per day; because we are counting birds, field days will start early (before sunrise) and will involve work on weekends, with days off during inclement weather. Free housing and a field vehicle will be provided. The field technician should expect rugged housing accommodations (just the basics, no Internet), ranging from bunkhouses and cabins to campgrounds. First aid/CPR training and driver safety training will also be provided at no cost to the field technician. To apply, please email a cover letter, resume/CV (no page limit), and contact information for 3 references to Hannah Clipp at hlclipp@mix.wvu.edu. In your cover letter, please mention any experiences you have with birding, camping, dealing with rugged field conditions, and/or navigating and working alone in remote areas. Applications will be reviewed as they are received. Qualifications: 1. Ability to identify eastern USA birds by sound and sight (required), as well as previous experience with avian point count surveys (preferred) 2. Earned (or are working towards) a Bachelor of Science degree in wildlife science, natural resources, or a similar field 3. Ability to navigate in the field and deal with challenging, difficult terrain (a lot of steep slopes) 4. Comfortable working alone in a remote outdoor setting 5. Ability and willingness to work in a one-, two-, or three-person team and individually during early morning and late evening fieldwork 6. Valid driver’s license with a clean driving record 7. Positive, upbeat attitude and strong work ethic Contact Person: Hannah Clipp Contact Email: hlclipp@mix.wvu.edu
  27. Dates of Employment: Feb 15 to mid August. End date is somewhat flexible Application deadline: Applications should be submitted by 31 Jan 2020 for full consideration. Number of Openings: 1 Job Description: The Southern Sierra Research Station (SSRS) is looking for one seasonal full-time technician to survey for three species of conservation concern in California: LeConte’s Thrasher, Tricolored Blackbird, and Willow Flycatcher. The primary duty of the technician will be to conduct surveys for LeConte’s Thrashers. Additionally, the technician will perform searches for nesting Tricolored Blackbirds within the Kern River Valley, assist with bird capture and telemetry. The technician will also contribute to Willow Flycatcher surveys within the Kern River Valley and vegetation sampling. There is also potential to contribute to other SSRS research projects during the season. All projects will require thorough data management skills (data entry and proofing of collected data will be a daily duty) and punctuality to begin avian surveys just before dawn. Required Qualifications: Must be able to identify some western songbirds by sight and sound (primarily the focal species), familiarity with western flora, a valid driver's license, and attention to detail is a must. Training for all survey protocols will be provided, but prior bird identification skills are required. Applicants must be in good physical condition, as long hours in the field will be required in sometimes difficult terrain. The applicant is expected to work well as a team member, and independently, to accomplish project tasks on schedule. Applicants should email a single file (word or pdf) which includes 1) cover letter stating their interest in the position, dates of availability, 2) a resume, and 3) names and contact information (email and phone) of three references to: John Stanek and Kristie Stein at the following email address: jobs.ssrs@gmail.com. Include your name and job you are applying to in the file name of your attachment (e.g. Darwin_C_application.doc) and in your email subject line. The Southern Sierra Research Station (www.southernsierraresearch.org) is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Salary: Salary: is $1,900-$2,300 /month DOE. Housing and field vehicle are provided. Shared housing will be provided at SSRS in Weldon, CA. Contact Person: John Stanek and Kristie Stein Contact Phone: 760-378-3345 Contact e-mail: jobs.ssrs@gmail.com
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