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  2. The Tarwater lab at the University of Wyoming is seeking 3 field technicians to work on our research projects focused on 1) the impacts of precipitation and fragmentation on bird populations and communities and 2) long-term demography of a suite of birds in central Panama. This is a unique opportunity to work in tropical rainforests hosting spectacular plant and animal communities, in addition to having the opportunity to interact with other researches and professors associated with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. The field season will last approximately six months, starting January 27th (Start date is flexible). Selected technicians will gain skills in a variety of avian field techniques while also working in a unique system. Duties include, but are not limited to, the following: 1) Point count censuses of army ant-follower birds 2) Army-Ant surveys 3) Behavioral observations of ant-follower birds 4) Bird banding. We will net birds across multiple forests and as part of the longest-running avian mist-netting project in the Neotropics. 5) Support other ongoing research projects and students coming to Panama during the summer (e.g., this can include helping record birds, working with manakins, etc.). 6) Data entry and maintenance of equipment. Applicants must have: - Previous experience in bird banding and conducting point counts. -A strong work ethic and dedication. - A good, professional attitude and outgoing nature. -Be in good enough physical condition to work in challenging conditions. The weather in Panama is hot and wet and there are many insects. -Ability to live with other 4-5 people and the flexibility to adapt quickly to changes in schedule if needed. Work weeks will be 5 days a week with early morning starts. Technicians are expected to enter data upon returning from the field. Compensation is $600/month with housing and flight to Panama provided. If interested, please send a letter of interest, your CV/resume, and information for three references to Laura Gómez-Murillo (lgomezmu@uwyo.edu). The deadline for applications is November 1st and will be reviewed as they are received. For more information visit:https://www.tarwaterlab.com.
  3. A Ph.D. position in avian conservation ecology is available in the Şekercioğlu Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology lab, Department of Biology, University of Utah for highly-motivated biologists experienced in working independently. The application deadline is January 3, 2019 and there is no application fee. Prospective applicants should visit our lab website http://sekercioglu.biology.utah.edu/ and read some of our papers on https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cagan_Sekercioglu before emailing c.s@utah.edu. The Ph.D. student will be expected to undertake population biology and conservation ecology analyses on our long-term bird banding datasets from Ethiopia, Turkey, and Utah, and to lead bird banding at some of these locations. Having extensive field experience and a bird banding license will be a plus, but not required. There will also be opportunities for conducting avian macroecology, conservation, biogeography, life history, and evolutionary meta-analyses based on our global bird database, covering all the world's bird species and updated continuously. The University of Utah Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology program provides five years of Ph.D. funding and has strengths in various fields. Our Global Change & Ecosystem Center provides opportunities for broad interdisciplinary research, education and outreach. http://www.biology.utah.edu/graduate/index.php http://environment.utah.edu/ Students are encouraged to seek external Ph.D. funding opportunities such as NSF Graduate Fellowships or EPA-STAR Fellowships, and will have much better chances of acceptance with one. Feel free to contact me with any questions. Çağan H. Şekercioğlu, Ph.D. Associate Professor University of Utah Department of Biology 257 S. 1400 E. Rm. 201 Salt Lake City, UT. 84112 *Email: c.s@utah.edu* www.sekercioglu.org https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cagan_Sekercioglu
  4. The Dayer Human Dimensions Lab in the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Techseeks to fill a M.S. position, working in close collaboration with the Smithsonian’s Virginia Working Landscapes Program (http://www.vaworkinglandscapes.org). The project will explore the value of several landowner outreach mechanisms (e.g., interactions with professional scientists, interactions with citizen scientists, and peer-to-peer networking events) in influencing landowner conservation behaviors. The student will have two three-month summer field seasons based in Front Royal, Virginia (housing provided at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute). The successful candidate will gain skills in qualitative and quantitative social science methods, as well as science co-production, working closely with university researchers, Smithsonian researchers and program managers, and a steering committee of citizen scientists and landowners. This approach will ensure that the project has utility for Smithsonian conservation programs and program participants. The successful candidate will be fully funded (tuition and stipend) on a combination of graduate research assistantships and graduate teaching assistantships for two full years. The candidate will be mentored by Dr. Ashley Dayer (http://www.dayer.fishwild.vt.edu/) and Dr. Amy Johnson (https://nationalzoo.si.edu/conservation/amy-em-johnson). Qualifications Applicants should have a strong interest and a prior degree in conservation biology, social sciences (preferably psychology, sociology, or communications), human dimensions, natural resources, or related discipline. Applicants should have past research experience (preferably social science or conservation biology), an outstanding academic record, and evidence of strong writing skills. Applicants must show an aptitude for co-produced science and communication with landowners and citizen scientists. Experience preferred: landowner outreach, other extension, or public education activities and conducting interviews or developing surveys. Start date for the assistantship is January 2020. Deadline for applications is Wednesday, October 16th. However, applications will be reviewed as they are received. To apply, please email a single PDF file to Dr. Ashley Dayer (dayer@vt.edu) containing (1) a one page cover letter outlining your research interests, career goals, and relevant experience for this position; (2) your CV; (3) undergraduate transcript(s) and GRE scores; and (4) full contact information for at least 3 professional references. The subject line of the email must read: Private Lands Graduate Position.
  5. Last week
  6. Description: The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University (College Station) is seeking either a MS or PhD level student to participate in an ongoing research program in avian/wildlife ecology in south Texas. The work includes all vertebrate groups, although we are currently seeking a person with substantial experience identifying songbirds. The student will assist with the selection, training, and management of a large seasonal field crew. The specific thesis/dissertation project has not been specified; thus the student will have wide latitude in selecting a project. The student will also serve as a TA in ornithology during one semester; other TA opportunities might be available if so desired. The graduate position formally begin 1 September 2020, although preference will be given to applicants available to conduct field work starting spring to early summer 2020. Compensation ranges from $1700-2100 per month salary including summer; tuition and fees are covered. Qualifications: Must be skilled in the identification of songbirds. Previous work in statistics and GIS highly desirable. Excellent English writing and verbal communication skills are essential; a valid driver’s license is required. For MS level, minimum GPA of >3.3 preferred including good/excellent grades in the sciences (math, statistics, chemistry) and previous field experience required; publication experience desirable. For the Ph.D. level, must have finished (or about to finish) the MS thesis, previous experience training and leading a field crew, and evidence of previous and ongoing publication in peer-reviewed journals required. Review of applicants will begin upon receipt, and the position will remain open until a suitable candidate is found. Applications received by 31 October 2019 will receive consideration. Interested individuals should send, as a single pdf, a letter of interest, CV, unofficial copies of transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information (current email and phone) for 3 references via email to: Dr Michael Morrison, Professor and Caesar Kleberg Chair mlmorrison@tamu.edu . All applicants will be acknowledged and kept updated on your status.
  7. We usually think of a species as being reproductively isolated—that is, not mating with other species in the wild. Occasionally, however, closely related species do interbreed. New research just published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances documents the existence of a previously undiscovered hybrid zone along the coast of northern California and southern Oregon, where two closely related bird hummingbirds, Allen's Hummingbird and Rufous Hummingbird, are blurring species boundaries. Researchers hope that studying cases such as this one could improve their understanding of how biodiversity is created and maintained. View the full article
  8. We are soliciting applications for a graduate research assistantship (M.S. in Biology or Ph.D. in Environmental Science) focused on understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on Loggerhead Shrikes. The student will be primarily advised by Dr. Than Boves at Arkansas State University, but will work in collaboration with Drs. Brett DeGregorio (University of Arkansas), Lori Neuman-Lee (Arkansas State University), and Amy Chabot (African Lion Safari/Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada), as well as with a PhD student at the University of Arkansas. The research will be centered on study sites in Arkansas and will consist of capturing and collecting blood and fecal samples from adult and nestling shrikes occupying a variety of habitats (e.g., intensive agriculture, native grasslands, pastures), conducting endocrinological and immunological lab work, monitoring survival and reproduction of marked individuals, and analyzing pesticide and fecal dietary data in relation to a variety of factors. Applicants must have a B.S. (for M.S. position) or M.S. (for Ph.D. position) in wildlife ecology, biology, or related field. Ideal candidates will have: (a) a sincere passion for avian ecology and conservation; (b) competitive GPA and GRE scores; (c) significant field experience that includes capturing, handling, and bleeding birds; (d) above average quantitative, writing, and oral communication skills; and (e) strong interpersonal skills as regular interaction with landowners, agency personnel, and other interested stakeholders will be expected. Applications will be accepted until 15 November 2019, although applications received sooner may be given early consideration, and the position is expected to begin in July 2020 (student will start coursework Fall 2020). Applicants should send (via email as a single .pdf) a cover letter that details why they are interested in the position along with their applicable experience and qualifications, a CV, copies of transcripts (unofficial is fine) and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Than Boves at tboves@astate.edu.
  9. We are soliciting applications for a graduate research assistantship (M.S. in Biology or Ph.D. in Environmental Science) focused on understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on Loggerhead Shrikes. The student will be primarily advised by Dr. Than Boves at Arkansas State University, but will work in collaboration with Drs. Brett DeGregorio (University of Arkansas), Lori Neuman-Lee (Arkansas State University), and Amy Chabot (African Lion Safari/Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada), as well as with a PhD student at the University of Arkansas. The research will be centered on study sites in Arkansas and will consist of capturing and collecting blood and fecal samples from adult and nestling shrikes occupying a variety of habitats (e.g., intensive agriculture, native grasslands, pastures), conducting endocrinological and immunological lab work, monitoring survival and reproduction of marked individuals, and analyzing pesticide and fecal dietary data in relation to a variety of factors. Applicants must have a B.S. (for M.S. position) or M.S. (for Ph.D. position) in wildlife ecology, biology, or related field. Ideal candidates will have: (a) a sincere passion for avian ecology and conservation; (b) competitive GPA and GRE scores; (c) significant field experience that includes capturing, handling, and bleeding birds; (d) above average quantitative, writing, and oral communication skills; and (e) strong interpersonal skills as regular interaction with landowners, agency personnel, and other interested stakeholders will be expected. Applications will be accepted until 15 November 2019, although applications received sooner may be given early consideration, and the position is expected to begin in July 2020 (student will start coursework Fall 2020). Applicants should send (via email as a single .pdf) a cover letter that details why they are interested in the position along with their applicable experience and qualifications, a CV, copies of transcripts (unofficial is fine) and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Than Boves at tboves@astate.edu.
  10. DNA tests have proven an extinct bird species unique to the Canary Islands—whose loss was considered a sizeable blow for genetic diversity—is actually almost identical to types commonly found in the UK and throughout Europe. View the full article
  11. In the past half-billion years, Earth has been hit again and again by mass extinctions, wiping out most species on the planet. And every time, life recovered and ultimately went on to increase in diversity. View the full article
  12. The Trump administration announced Thursday its final plan to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling, giving the petroleum industry access to the pristine wildland for the first time. View the full article
  13. The Threatened Species Recovery Hub study, conducted by University of Queensland scientists and published in the journal Conservation Biology, found that half of all native bird species have each lost almost two-thirds of their natural habitat across Victoria, parts of South Australia and New South Wales. Lead researcher, Dr Jeremy Simmonds, said the team looked at both threatened and non-threatened birds, including common species: “While more attention is usually paid to threatened species, common species, like many of our familiar fairy-wrens, pigeons and honeyeaters, are crucially important. Common species play a vital role in controlling insect pests and pollination and their decline through loss of habitat has implications for the health of ecosystems. Along with feral and invasive species, habitat destruction is among the greatest threats facing biodiversity in Australia, so it is important to understand how big the problem of habitat removal is: our research developed a method to do this, called the Loss Index.” The team looked at how the amount of habitat available for each of Australia’s 447 different land bird species had changed since 1750. In places like Queensland’s south-east and the Wet Tropics, each hectare of forest cleared can affect up to 180 different native bird species. Dr Simmonds continued: “Habitat loss has been particularly devastating for birds from south-east Australia; more than half of the 262 native birds in this region only have a small fraction of their natural habitat remaining in this part of the country. Northern Australia and Australia’s arid zone have had the least habitat loss, as there has been much less vegetation clearing across that region. We also looked at different bird groups and found that Australia’s parrot species are more impacted by habitat loss, compared with birds of prey, like eagles and owls.” One such parrot is the orange-bellied parrot, a migratory species, listed as critically endangered. The 2016 to 2017 breeding season saw just 16 confirmed individuals in the wild. The Norfolk parakeet is listed as endangered and is found only in a small region of Norfolk Island. Numbers had dwindled to less than 50 birds by 1970, primarily due to the loss of large old trees with suitable hollows for them to breed in. Dr Simmonds said the index provided a tool for conservation managers and planners to better understand how habitat loss affects all birds, and not just the endangered ones. He says: “It helps to show that every hectare of native vegetation that is removed chips away at remaining habitat for dozens and sometimes hundreds of species, including common species which typically do not receive conservation attention. The quality of the remaining habitat is often reduced, due to weeds, grazing and changed fire patterns, such as more and hotter fires, and this can further reduce the number and type of birds that an area can support.” The Loss Index can also be applied to other species like mammals or plants to summarise and communicate how human actions affect whole assemblages, not just threatened species. View the full article
  14. The University of Oklahoma College of Arts and Sciences is excited to announce three open faculty positions at any rank in the Department of Biology. As part of our Biology of Behavior strategic initiative, the department continues to build an internationally recognized center of excellence in studying mechanisms of organismal behavior. We are searching for creative, collaborative thinkers to join us in taking an integrative and multifaceted approach to understanding the ultimate and proximate causes of behavior. The Department of Biology already has a strong focus on the study of animal behavior, including 16 complementary faculty research programs that investigate the neurobiological, developmental, and evolutionary processes that underlie how animals behave. See http://ou.edu/bb/ for more details. We seek to enhance the collaborative momentum of this initiative by inviting individuals with creative, innovative, and dynamic research programs who are interested in joining a strong group of researchers to apply for these faculty positions: · A Geneticist who uses integrative molecular approaches to understand the evolution, specification, and/or regulation of how genes affect organismal behavior. · A Behavioral Physiologist who studies the endocrine regulation and modulation of behavior. · An Evolutionary Developmental Biologist who studies how developmental processes give rise to organismal morphology, nervous system structures, and/or physiology that lay the foundation for the generation of behavior. The anticipated start date for these positions is August 2020. For additional details, please visit http://ou.edu/bb and http://www.ou.edu/cas/biology. QUALIFICATIONS Candidates must have a Ph.D. degree and a record of outstanding achievement as evidenced by publications. Preferred candidates will have a promising (Assistant professor) or externally funded (Associate/Full professor) research program. Successful candidates will be expected to provide excellent research training for students and postdocs and contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching (one course per semester) in areas such as animal behavior, genetics, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology, genomics, or bioinformatics. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS Applicants should submit a cover letter describing their interest in a position, a full curriculum vitae, research and teaching statements, and up to five selected reprints/preprints as PDF files to the website for the appropriate position: Geneticist: https://apply.interfolio.com/67539 Behavioral Physiologist: https://apply.interfolio.com/67562 Evolutionary Developmental Biologist: https://apply.interfolio.com/67569 Applicants at the rank of Assistant Professor should also arrange to have three signed letters of reference uploaded to the appropriate website. Applicants at the rank of Associate Professor or Professor may submit names and contact information for three references in lieu of letters. Screening of candidates will begin October 15, 2019 and will continue until the positions are filled. The University of Oklahoma is an EO/Affirmative Action institution http://www.ou.edu/eoo/. Individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply. In compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations, the University of Oklahoma does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, gender identity, gender expression, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures. This includes, but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services.
  15. We are looking for volunteer field assistants who want to work with endangered grassland birds in northeastern Argentina’s grasslands. In a scenario in which 75% of Argentina’s natural grasslands have already been lost to productive activities, and where only 1% of those remaining grasslands are under protection, an urgent need arises to assess the effects livestock grazing, one of the main activities of northeastern Argentina, has on endangered bird species. In this project, we will evaluate the response of three globally threatened grassland birds, the Strange-tailed Tyrant Alectrurus risora (Vulnerable), Black-and-white Monjita Xolmis dominicanus (Vulnerable) and Iberá Seedeater Sporophila iberaensis (Endangered), as well as other capuchino species, to livestock activities. Where? Our fieldwork takes place in the Iberá Wetlands (Corrientes, Argentina). We will focus our survey efforts in a private grazing field near Loreto, but we will also make short trips to different private fields in the Departments of San Miguel and Mburucuyá. What? Field activities include: nest searching, nest monitoring, chick and adult banding, camera-trap monitoring, video recordings and vegetation measurements. When? We need field assistants from the 1st of November until the 21st of December. Minimum stay: 3 weeks. Who? Applicants should enjoy fieldwork, even under extreme conditions (high temperatures, humidity and insect activity). The ability to make careful observations and self-motivation will be much appreciated. Costs? The project covers the costs during the volunteer’s stay (food and insurance). We can also cover the traveling fees from Buenos Aires to Corrientes, however transportation costs to Buenos Aires will need to be covered by the volunteer. Housing will be provided in some fields, however we will camp on others. The project counts with a spare tent that can be used by volunteers. Volunteers should bring their own sleeping bag and bed linings. We usually count with electricity and fresh water, however internet access is usually limited. We usually use bicycles to cover short distances (i.e. 7-10 km). How? If you are interested in exploring the Argentinian “Far-Far North”, please send a short motivation letter stating why you would like to volunteer and the dates in which you can participate and a curriculum vitae to Melanie Browne (melaniebrowne.mb@gmail.com) with the subject "Volunteer opportunity 2019". If you have any doubts, please do not hesitate to ask!
  16. New research at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for a dramatic decline in songbird populations. View the full article
  17. Requisition No: 72263 Agency: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Working Title: OPS- F & W BS IV - 77905045 Position Number: 77905045 Salary: $24.38 an hour Posting Closing Date: 09/22/2019 Position number: 77905045 Title: OPS Fisheries & Wildlife Biological Scientist IV Address: 3911 HWY 2321 Panama City, FL 32409 OPS Employment: This is an OPS (Other Personnel Services) position which means that employees are paid for the number of hours they work. OPS employees do not receive any form of paid leave, paid holidays, or participation in the Florida Retirement System. OPS employees do have the option to receive health insurance benefits. NOTE: Interested applicants should submit an application to the People First Vacancy 77905045. A cover letter describing the applicant’s experience, CV, and references should be submitted with the application. https://jobs.myflorida.com/job/PANAMA-CITY-OPS-F-&-W-BS-IV-77905045-FL-32409/586762900/ Supervisor Emily Evans can be reached at Emily.Evans@MYFWC.COM Description of duties: Seeking a dedicated biologist with a strong background in shorebird and seabird (shorebird) conservation to serve as a Regional Shorebird Biologist for a 16-county region of northwest Florida. The primary responsibility of this position is overseeing the implementation of shorebird and seabird conservation actions locally, regionally, and in some cases, statewide: Work with local governments, landowners, and resource managers to improve conservation of shorebirds (habitat management, habitat creation, predator management, posting) through outreach, technical assistance, recognition, etc. Supervise predation management and Critical Wildlife Area program staff in the Northwest Region. Oversee the implementation of regional predation management including prioritization and contracting predator control agents. Work with partners to ensure high-priority sites are posted; Fill in monitoring gaps as needed. Monitor the Florida Shorebird Database during nesting season and communicate issues/deficiencies to the Partner Data Quality Manager. Work with partners to problem-solve controversial regional issues, especially those with potential regulatory consequences (fireworks, beach driving, local landowners protesting posting of nesting areas). Improve the effectiveness of law enforcement efforts by developing and delivering annual training to law enforcement staff. Engage in coastal engineering permitting issues, permit reviews, developing guidelines & conditions, improving permit compliance, and participating in relevant environmental commenting. Provide scientific support and aid in implementation of statewide conservation initiatives such as the Florida Beaches Habitat Conservation Plan. Assist with the development of Biological Status Reviews and otherwise assist with the imperiled species listing process. Implement habitat management, creation, and restoration projects. Assist with shorebird research and survey projects. Be an active participant in regional partnership meetings and, where there is a leadership gap, serve as lead or co-lead. Participate in regional/national conservation efforts, partnerships, flyway-wide efforts. Knowledge/Skills/Abilities: B.S. degree in wildlife or related natural resource management (M.S. preferred); a minimum of 3 years professional experience in similar field; shorebird/seabird conservation expertise; strong data management skills; strong written and communication skills; people-oriented, outgoing personality, highly diplomatic, enjoys engaging with partners and stakeholders; independent and self-directed; prefer candidates proficient in boating, trailer hauling, and ATV operation. Broadband code 19-1023-04 Class code 5075 Region NW Title Regional Shorebird Biologist County Bay Working hours 8-5 List of any subordinates supervised 5 OPS Staff: 3 Predation Management biologists, 1 CWA shorebird biologist, 1 seasonal shorebird biologist Residency requirement None Level of Education- B.S. in a life pr physical sciences Rate of Pay: $24.38 an hour For User I.D. and password problems contact Convergys at 1-866-663-4735 The State of Florida is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action Employer, and does not tolerate discrimination or violence in the workplace. Candidates requiring a reasonable accommodation, as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act, must notify the agency hiring authority and/or People First Service Center (1-866-663-4735). Notification to the hiring authority must be made in advance to allow sufficient time to provide the accommodation. The State of Florida supports a Drug-Free workplace. All employees are subject to reasonable suspicion drug testing in accordance with Section 112.0455, F.S., Drug-Free Workplace Act. Nearest Major Market: Panama City
  18. This position announcement has been extend until Sep. 22, 2019.
  19. A new article identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueling flight across the Gulf of Mexico. View the full article
  20. It was a puzzle about birds. View the full article
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  22. Registration is now open for the 15th North American Crane Workshop to be held 8-11 January 2020 in Lubbock, Texas. The North American Crane Working Group is accepting abstracts for oral and poster presentations until 1 October 2019. The Southern High Plains is home to 80% of the overwintering Mid-Continent Population of sandhill cranes. The Workshop will include two full days of presentations and one day of field trips, including to Muleshoe National Wildlife Refuge and local ranches. Check http://www.nacwg.org/workshop15.html for details and additional information.
  23. NATURAL RESOURCE SPECIALIST, WILDLIFE WORKER position, Virginia Tech, available immediately to assist with research on red-cockaded woodpeckers on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Must be in good physical condition, able to climb to 60’ and operate power drills and 4-wheel drive vehicles. Bachelor’s degree in biology, zoology, fisheries and wildlife biology or related field required. Experience working with red-cockaded woodpeckers, reading color bands, constructing artificial cavities, identifying birds by sight and sound and banding birds preferred. Experience working on a military base desirable. Position involves working in strenuous field conditions, coordinating with military personnel and working around active military training. Salary dependent on qualifications, full benefits. This is a long term, year round position. For a full description of the position and requirements, and to apply, please go to https://jobs.vt.edu/careers.html and search for job 511054. Application review will begin September 23, 2019 Virginia Tech is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. If you have questions, email Jeff Walters at jrwalt@vt.edu.
  24. NATURAL RESOURCE SPECIALIST, FIELD COORDINATOR position, Virginia Tech, available immediately to assist with research on red-cockaded woodpeckers on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Must be in good physical condition, able to climb to 60’ and operate power drills and 4-wheel drive vehicles. Bachelor’s degree in biology, zoology, fisheries and wildlife biology or related field required. Experience working with red-cockaded woodpeckers, reading color bands, constructing artificial cavities, identifying birds by sight and sound and banding birds preferred. Masters degree, experience working on a military base and supervisory experience are desirable. Position demands excellent organizational skills and involves coordinating with military personnel and working around active military training. Salary dependent on qualifications, full benefits. This is a long term, year round position. For a full description of the position and requirements, and to apply, please go to https://jobs.vt.edu/careers.html and search for job 511040. Application review will begin September 23, 2019 Virginia Tech is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. If you have questions, email Jeff Walters at jrwalt@vt.edu.
  25. Two full-time technicians are needed to assist a graduate student at Arkansas Tech University with their work on the winter ecology of Rusty Blackbirds in Arkansas. The Rusty Blackbird is one of the most rapidly declining songbirds in North America, and the goal of this research is to determine the factors which may be influencing that decline. The research will focus on sex- and age-specific survival, habitat use, and home range size. Specific duties include locating birds, setting up and taking down mist nets in Rusty habitat, extracting birds from mist nets, banding and processing birds, attaching radio transmitters to birds, and using radio telemetry to monitor birds. We will be capturing and tracking birds at various sites throughout the state, so there will be some travel involved. While some training will be provided, experience with setting up mist nets, extracting and banding birds, and radio telemetry is strongly desired. Preferred qualifications and experience include: -identifying Rusty Blackbirds by sight and sound -using binoculars and spotting scopes -resighting color-banded birds -ageing and sexing birds in hand -color banding birds -synsacral transmitter attachment -conducting vegetation surveys -conducting field work on private land and communicating with land owners -working independently with minimal supervision -living in remote areas, with basic amenities, for extended periods of time -flexible and positive attitude A valid driver’s license and good driving record are required. A university vehicle will be available for job-related travel, but a personal vehicle is recommended for non-work use. The field season will be December 1, 2019 – March 31, 2020 (tentative). Housing will be provided in the form of a bunkhouse or trailer. The salary will be $10/hr. To apply, please send a cover letter detailing your interest and qualifications, a resume, and contact information for three references in a single PDF or Word document to Araks Ohanyan at aohanyan@atu.edu. Please include “Rusty Blackbird Technician” in the subject line. Selected applicants will be required to complete an employment application through Arkansas Tech University, and will need to pass a background check to qualify for employment. The deadline to apply is October 31, 2019. Applications will be reviewed as they are received. Please contact Araks Ohanyan at aohanyan@atu.edu if you have any questions.
  26. RESEARCH INTERNS (4) needed for approximately 6-8 months in the Avian Ecology Program at Archbold Biological Station, directed by Dr. Reed Bowman. Our research focuses primarily on the demography, ecology, and behavior of the Federally Threatened Florida Scrub-Jay. Interns contribute to several aspects of this research, but their duties primarily focus on searching for and monitoring nests, conducting monthly censuses of color-banded birds, and habituating birds for subsequent trapping. In addition, interns may assist in surveys of jay populations at other sites, trapping and banding jays, mapping territories, measuring and bleeding adult and nestling birds, processing blood samples, and counting acorns and arthropods. Interns are expected to devote a minimum of 50% of their time to our long-term projects and to devote the rest of their time to an independent project on some aspect of the ecology of scrub-jays. Internships offer an opportunity for experience in every aspect of scientific research, from project choice and experimental design to oral and written presentations. These internships are excellent preparation for students intending to pursue graduate school (see "The Postbac: One or two years that make careers," in Science Careers, from the 10 Aug. 2007 issue of Science). Applicants should be interested in birds, ecology and evolution, natural history, and preparing themselves for graduate school. Applicants must also possess a strong desire to engage in independent research, the ability to work under hot, humid field conditions, and enjoy working and living as part of a group. Applicants must have completed their undergraduate degree by the start of the internship, and have field experience outside of coursework. Experience resighting color banded birds, finding and monitoring nests, conducting animal surveys, vegetation sampling, and using a compass and GPS is preferred, but we do hire interns that have yet to learn those skills. As ecologists, we know the importance of diversity and encourage individuals belonging to groups under-represented in ecology to apply. Internships include a $160 weekly stipend, breakfast and lunch Mon-Fri, dormitory-style housing shared with several roommates, and expenses associated with their independent project. Opportunities for graduate research also exist. All positions begin in mid-late January but the exact start date is flexible. Internship duration can be either 6-months (through July) or 8-months (through September), but we need two people to commit to staying through September. To apply, please send a single pdf titled with your surname that includes: (1) a cover letter outlining experience relevant to the job responsibilities described, and how you believe an internship in our lab will help you achieve your goals, (2) a CV, (3) unofficial transcripts, and (4) the names and contact information of three references by 14 October 2019, to Dr. Angela Tringali (atringali AT archbold-station.org) and Dr. Reed Bowman (rbowman AT archbold-station.org). Please include “2020 Avian Ecology Intern Application” in the subject of your email. Those without access to email may mail or fax their applications to The Avian Ecology Program, Archbold Biological Station, 123 Main Dr. Venus, FL 33960; (PH: 863-659-4825, FX: 863-465-4278). Please note that we are unable to provide international applicants with a work visa. Additional information on internships at Archbold Biological Station and the Avian Ecology Program can be found at the following webpages: http://www.archbold-station.org/html/research/internship/internship.html http://www.archbold-station.org/html/research/avian/avian.html
  27. An 1832 description of a swamp said that that it was so full of extinct animal bones that you only had to stick your hand in the water to retrieve them. Inspired by this a group of international researchers, including the Natural History Museum's Dr. Julian Hume, went in search of it. View the full article
  28. Weka are often portrayed as little more than sandwich-stealing scallywags. The large, brown flightless bird's tendency to be curious and gobble any food available (whether it be an unwatched biscuit, penguin egg or endangered gecko) also makes them troublesome for conservationists. However, a new study by University of Canterbury and Department of Conservation researchers has found that these charismatic birds also perform important services for Aotearoa New Zealand forests. View the full article
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