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  1. Organisms carry long-term 'memories' of their ancestral homelands that help them adapt to environmental change, according to a new study that involved raising chickens on the Tibetan Plateau and an adjacent lowland site. View the full article
  2. A new study has confirmed and quantified, for the first time, the presence of microplastics in terrestrial and aquatic birds of prey in Florida, including hawks, ospreys and owls. The research is important because birds of prey are critical to a functioning ecosystem. The accumulation of microplastics in their digestive systems could lead to poisoning, starvation and death. View the full article
  3. As the world looks to tighten up the illegal capture of wildlife, migratory birds are being threatened by widespread and unsustainable hunting across the Asia-Pacific region. New research has revealed that three quarters of migratory shorebird species in the region have been hunted since the 1970s. View the full article
  4. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that penguins in Antarctica emit copious amounts of nitrous oxide via their feces. So much so, that the researchers went ''cuckoo'' from being surrounded by penguin poop. View the full article
  5. Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to new research. View the full article
  6. Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements. View the full article
  7. Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study. View the full article
  8. The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. Now, researchers have discovered a previously unknown energy-saving method used by birds during the polar night. View the full article
  9. When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. Hundreds of neighboring trees went with it, opening a massive 2.5-acre gap in the Panamanian rainforest. Treefalls happen all the time, but this one just happened to occur in the exact spot where a decades-long ecological study was in progress, giving researchers a rare look into tropical forest dynamics. View the full article
  10. Evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds. View the full article
  11. To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behavior -- such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. New information gathered using geolocators on godwits in the Netherlands shows that traditional observation methods can lead to inaccurate data. View the full article
  12. Flamingos form friendships that last for years, new research shows. View the full article
  13. The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. This new knowledge may help protect vulnerable bird species. View the full article
  14. Many millions of homeowners use feeders to attract birds. But a two-year study suggests there may be one unintended consequence to this popular hobby. Bird feed mixtures may be helping to spread troublesome weeds that threaten agricultural crops. View the full article
  15. The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the age of dinosaurs, has been identified by an international team of palaeontologists. View the full article
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