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  1. Organisms carry long-term 'memories' of their ancestral homelands that help them adapt to environmental change, according to a new study that involved raising chickens on the Tibetan Plateau and an adjacent lowland site. View the full article
  2. A new study has confirmed and quantified, for the first time, the presence of microplastics in terrestrial and aquatic birds of prey in Florida, including hawks, ospreys and owls. The research is important because birds of prey are critical to a functioning ecosystem. The accumulation of microplastics in their digestive systems could lead to poisoning, starvation and death. View the full article
  3. As the world looks to tighten up the illegal capture of wildlife, migratory birds are being threatened by widespread and unsustainable hunting across the Asia-Pacific region. New research has revealed that three quarters of migratory shorebird species in the region have been hunted since the 1970s. View the full article
  4. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that penguins in Antarctica emit copious amounts of nitrous oxide via their feces. So much so, that the researchers went ''cuckoo'' from being surrounded by penguin poop. View the full article
  5. Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to new research. View the full article
  6. Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements. View the full article
  7. Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study. View the full article
  8. The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. Now, researchers have discovered a previously unknown energy-saving method used by birds during the polar night. View the full article
  9. When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. Hundreds of neighboring trees went with it, opening a massive 2.5-acre gap in the Panamanian rainforest. Treefalls happen all the time, but this one just happened to occur in the exact spot where a decades-long ecological study was in progress, giving researchers a rare look into tropical forest dynamics. View the full article
  10. Evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds. View the full article
  11. To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behavior -- such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. New information gathered using geolocators on godwits in the Netherlands shows that traditional observation methods can lead to inaccurate data. View the full article
  12. Flamingos form friendships that last for years, new research shows. View the full article
  13. The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. This new knowledge may help protect vulnerable bird species. View the full article
  14. Many millions of homeowners use feeders to attract birds. But a two-year study suggests there may be one unintended consequence to this popular hobby. Bird feed mixtures may be helping to spread troublesome weeds that threaten agricultural crops. View the full article
  15. The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the age of dinosaurs, has been identified by an international team of palaeontologists. View the full article
  16. Researchers found that farms with diverse crops planted together provide more secure, stable habitats for wildlife and are more resilient to climate change than the single-crop standard that dominates today's agriculture industry. View the full article
  17. New findings suggest several island bird populations in the Pacific that were previously designated as a single species actually comprise up to four distinct species. The results upend understanding of the islands' robin populations, which have been used as a textbook example of evolution since the 1940s. The new findings have important implications for conservation, as some of the newly-designated species live only on a few isolated islands. View the full article
  18. A new study of North American birds finds that the regional stability of ecosystems over time depends on both the total number of species present in a locality and on the variation in species identities among localities. View the full article
  19. A growing body of research shows that birds' spring migration has been getting earlier and earlier in recent decades. New research on Black-throated Blue Warblers, a common songbird that migrates from Canada and the eastern US to Central America and back every year, uses fifty years of bird-banding data to add another piece to the puzzle, showing that little-studied fall migration patterns have been shifting over time as well. View the full article
  20. By watching videos of each other eating, blue tits and great tits can learn to avoid foods that taste disgusting and are potentially toxic, a new study has found. View the full article
  21. Every social network has its fake news. And in animal communication networks, even birds discern the trustworthiness of their neighbors, a new study suggests. View the full article
  22. Darwin's finches are among the most celebrated examples of adaptive radiation in the evolution of modern vertebrates and now a new study has provided fresh insights into their rapid development and evolutionary success. View the full article
  23. Using albatrosses fitted with loggers, researchers have made a first estimation of the number of non-declared fishing boats operating without an identification system in the Southern Ocean: more than a third of the boats the birds detected in international water were non-declared. View the full article
  24. Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide information about the stage of development. But how do you look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs? View the full article
  25. New study shows that peach-fronted conures have a surprisingly advanced talent for collaboration when it comes to finding food. This is important knowledge for biologists working with conservation of wild bird populations. View the full article
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