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  1. Researchers in the University of Wyoming's Department of Zoology and Physiology and Program in Ecology discovered that size does matter—as it pertains to the effectiveness of secondary species' wildlife protection relative to the size of a wildlife reserve set aside for an umbrella species. View the full article
  2. Researchers in the University of Wyoming's Department of Zoology and Physiology and Program in Ecology discovered that size does matter—as it pertains to the effectiveness of secondary species' wildlife protection relative to the size of a wildlife reserve set aside for an umbrella species. View the full article
  3. Every year, North America's critically endangered Whooping Cranes travel back and forth along a 4,000-kilometer corridor linking their nesting grounds in Canada and their winter home in Texas. Habitat in their path through the northern Great Plains is being lost at an alarming rate to agriculture and other development, but the birds' widely dispersed movements make identifying key spots for protection a challenge. Now, researchers behind a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications have created a model of Whooping Crane habitat use with the potential to greatly improve the targeting of conservation efforts during their migration. View the full article
  4. A new study about New Zealand's extinct moa, involving acid baths and concrete mixers, by researchers from the University of Canterbury and Landcare Research, has revealed a surprising finding about their ability to disperse tree seeds. View the full article
  5. Step aside, charismatic polar bear stranded on a melting iceberg. The springtail may be the new flag bearer of an uncertain Arctic future. View the full article
  6. Animal species with males who compete intensively for mates might be more resilient to the effects of climate change, according to research by Queen Mary University of London. View the full article
  7. Zookeepers in Prague have turned into puppeteers in an effort to save the critically endangered Javan green magpie. View the full article
  8. Most people probably wouldn't consider bustling towns and cities good places for nature to thrive. Yet a few species of birds have so successfully adapted to city living that they boast large and thriving urban populations. Now, research has suggested that the success of these city-dwelling species may lie in their behaviour. View the full article
  9. The Trump administration has announced a position on protecting migratory birds that is a drastic pullback from policies in force for the past 100 years. View the full article
  10. With feathers on its head that make it look like it is wearing a wig, it does not go unnoticed—the Dalmatian pelican is back with a flourish in the Divjaka Lagoon in western Albania. View the full article
  11. A faithful male flying thousands of miles each year to join his handicapped female who cannot fly—the story of two storks in Croatia, Klepetan and Malena, is one of love and devotion beating the odds. View the full article
  12. People in crowded urban areas - especially poor areas - see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential "nuisance" birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows. View the full article
  13. In the world of Costa's hummingbirds, it's not size that matters—it's sound. During breeding season, male Costa's perform a high-speed dive during which they "sing" to potential mates using their tail feathers. View the full article
  14. It's likely you've never heard of a hihi, let alone seen one in the wild. Also known as stitchbirds, these colourful little critters are a true taonga, or treasure. They're only found in New Zealand, and currently restricted to just seven sanctuary sites. View the full article
  15. A new way to prioritize species for conservation efforts outperforms other similar methods, according to research presented in PLOS ONE by Rikki Gumbs of Imperial College London, UK, and colleagues at the Zoological Society of London, UK. View the full article
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