Jump to content
Ornithology Exchange

Laura Bies

General Members
  • Content Count

    69
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1 Has posted some good stuff

Profile Information

  • Location
    Washington, DC
  • Country
    United States

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. The Ornithological Council is planning a minor revision to the Guidelines to the Use of Wild Birds in Research. This foundational publication, now in its third edition, provides an in-depth guide to the animal welfare considerations when performing research involving wild birds, including ethical considerations and the legal framework that must be followed by researchers. Topics include investigator impact generally, collecting and trapping, marking, transport, housing and captive breeding, minor and major manipulative procedures, and euthanasia. The last edition was published in 2010. The Ornithological Council is interested in compiling updated references from the last 10 years so we can include those in the next update. If you are aware of a methods paper relevant to a topic covered in the Guidelines, please submit the citation (and if you have it, a PDF of the paper or a link to it) to Laura Bies (laurabiesoc@gmail.com). Also submit papers that are not methods papers per se but assess the impact of the study methods. We are also looking for volunteers to coordinate the literature reviews for each chapter. If you are interested in volunteering, contact Laura Bies at laurabiesoc@gmail.com. The chapters in the Guidelines are: Introduction Impact of Investigator Presence Capture and Marking Transport of Wild Bird Captive Management Minor Manipulative Procedures Major Manipulative Procedures Scientific Collecting The 2010 edition of Guidelines is available here. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  2. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The Ornithological Council provided input about some of the key science and technology positions in the U.S. Government, as part of an effort to highlight these roles for the new administration. The Day One Project, an initiative of the Federation of American Scientists, is developing a list of 100 key existing and proposed leadership roles across the federal government where scientific expertise is most critical. The OC submitted several positions to Day One, highlighting the role these positions play in ensuring science-based decision-making. At the departmental level, the OC highlighted the Science Advisor to the Secretary of the Interior, which offers key science support to the Secretary of the Interior. We also highlighted positions within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Geological Survey. The OC submitted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director as a key position, given the position’s responsibility for applying scientific information to wildlife management and conservation decisions. We noted the importance of ensuring that the nominee for this position meets the statutory requirement to be knowledgeable in the principles of fisheries and wildlife management, through scientific education and experience. We also highlighted the Assistant Director for Science Applications, who works directly with, and reports directly to, the agency’s Director, helping to ensure that the director has the scientific information they need to make these key decisions. The OC also submitted the USGS Director, noting that agency’s responsibility as the nation's largest research agency devoted to providing science about natural resources, natural hazards, the health of our ecosystems and environment, and the impacts of climate and land-use change. We noted that during the Trump Administration, the USGS was criticized for denying climate change and preventing its scientists from speaking openly about it. Finally, we highlighted the USGS Chief Scientist position, noting that as one of the federal government’s leaders in basic research regarding our natural world, the USGS needs a top scientist who can support its career scientists and provide science-based, apolitical counsel to its Director. Once the new administration is in place, Day One will track the administration’s progress on filling the 100 key roles it identifies. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  3. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. In September, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that they are downlisting the Red-cockaded Woodpeckers from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, citing partnerships with both the Department of Defense and the U.S. Forest Service, along with more than 30 other public and private organizations, as being key to the recovery. The USFWS is also considering adopting a rule that will prohibit incidental take of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers from actions that would result in the further habitat loss or degradation, such as activities that would harass Red-cockaded Woodpeckers during the breeding season and the insecticide use near clusters. On 1 December, the USFWS will hold a public informational meeting from 6 to 7:30 p.m., Eastern Time, followed by a public hearing from 7:30 to 9 p.m., Eastern Time, via Zoom. Registration is required and an opportunity to provide formal testimony will be provided during the public hearing portion of the event. Register to attend the meeting and to provide testimony here. The agency is accepting written comments on the proposal until 7 December. Submit a comment here. Read more about the downlisting here. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  4. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The Ornithological Council nominated two ornithologists for a new standing committee on animal welfare. The Institute for Laboratory Animal Research issued a call to nominate experts for a new Standing Committee for the Care and Use of Animals in Research earlier this fall. The new committee will help foster the exchange of ideas and knowledge on how best to make any future updates to the Guide for the Care and Use of Animals in Research, a prominent guidance document for animal welfare. The OC nominated Dr. William Bowerman and Dr. Rafael Rueda-Hernández for the new committee. Dr. William Bowerman is a Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Toxicology and the Chair of the Department of Environmental Science and Toxicology at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is a world-renowned expert on studying environmental change through its impact on eagle populations, and a highly-regarded researcher, teacher, and leader in the scientific community. Dr. Rafael Rueda-Hernández is a Postdoctoral Scholar of the Department of Evolutionary Biology at the Universidad Nacional Autònoma de México, Mexico City and a Senior Research Fellow with the University of California, Los Angeles. He has extensive experience in handling and caring of wild birds for research purposes, and is a highly-regarded ornithologist and leader in the scientific community in Mexico and the Neotropics. The OC also separately contacted the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research, urging them to use this new standing committee as an opportunity to involve a subset of researchers that have been heretofore underrepresented by those involved with developing and publishing ILAR’s Guide to the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals - wildlife professionals. The Guide to the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals is widely applied to research conducted or funded by the federal government and is a suitable standard for biomedical research. However, it has little information relevant to wildlife research beyond general principles. It is crucial that scientists and researchers with experience working in the field are represented on the new committee and are able to offer their expertise and feedback on the committee tasks and deliberations. Nominations are being accepted through Nov. 6. Learn more here. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  5. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The Ornithological Council has updated the fact sheets available on its website, BIRDNET.ORG. Visit the Fact Sheet page on BIRDNET to view fact sheets on: Avian influenza and West Nile virus Rapid Cardiac Compression The Use of Drones to Study Birds Scientific Collecting There is also a general fact sheet that provides more information about the OC and its publications. If there’s another topic on which you think it would be beneficial for the OC to develop a fact sheet, let us know! About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  6. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today launched a new online permit system that will allow applicants to submit, pay for, and track their permit applications online. The new system will be phased in over the coming months, with some permits available in the system immediately and some being added in the coming months. Not all permits used by ornithologists are available yet in the new system. Scientific collecting permits, for example, won’t be available through epermits until early next year. Also, note that amendments and modifications of current permits will be handled offline until early 2021. This new epermits system will replace the previous online system, launched last year, which allowed permitees to search for and download the appropriate forms. The Ornithological Council encourages ornithologist to register for and use the new epermits system. If you have questions or problems with the new system, please contact the OC and we can work with the USFWS to resolve them. The Ornithological Council has encouraged USFWS to adopt an electronic permit system for years, to reduce the paperwork burden on researchers and others applicants and to enable faster permit processing and better tracking. We’re encouraged to see this system launch and look forward to all the USFWS permits being available in the new system. Permits to band birds issued by the USGS Bird Banding Lab will not be affected by this change and should continue to be sent to the BBL in Laurel, MD. To apply for permits through the Service’s new epermits system or for more information , please visit fws.gov/epermits. -- USFWS Press Release -- Service Launches New Electronic Permitting System to Streamline and Improve Permitting Process New electronic system will modernize permit applications, helping the public and wildlife October 21, 2020 Contact(s): Christina Meister, Christina_Meister@fws.gov, 703-358-2284 To simplify, expedite and improve the permit application process, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is launching “ePermits,” a new and modern electronic permitting system. Permits enable the public to engage in certain regulated wildlife-related activities. Service permit programs help ensure these activities are carried out in a manner that safeguards wildlife. The Service issues permits under several domestic and international laws and treaties such as the Endangered Species Act, the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Wild Bird Conservation Act and the Lacey Act. These laws protect species that are threatened by overexploitation and other factors. “I am proud of the Service’s work to create an innovative platform that will help simplify and expedite the permitting process,” said Aurelia Skipwith, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “The Trump Administration has prioritized developing innovative solutions for the American people, and this online tool for permit applications further delivers accountability and transparency.” “The enhancement of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild Fauna and Flora electronic permitting procedure, as well as the planned upgrades, will only further benefit our industry by continuing to improve the permitting process,” said Patricia Fuquene, Director of Import/Export, Costa Farms LLC. Permits are issued for activities such as import and export of live animals, plants, or biomedical samples, rehabilitation of sick or injured migratory birds, scientific research or reintroduction programs for endangered species, and exchange of museum specimens between institutions for protected species. Each year, the Service issues approximately 65,000 permits. Prior to ePermits, applicants had to apply for permits through the mail and pay with paper checks, often resulting in delays that now may be avoided through the digital process. The hard-copy option is still available to those who need it, and ePermits offers many advantages for applicants including a new permit application search feature. The new system also uses pay.gov, a secure electronic payment system, to process applicant permit fees. Once an application is submitted, the new system allows applicants to view and track their application’s progress. Enhancements to ePermits and additional functionality are planned on a regular basis through July 2021 to make the application process more efficient and to allow for a more robust ability to analyze data to track business and conservation trends. Digital permit applications forms are available in ePermits for the Service’s Office of Law Enforcement and Ecological Services, Migratory Birds and International Affairs programs. Users can find the permit applications they need through a search function and can get answers to frequently asked questions through easy-to-use “help center” content. “The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies is excited about and supports the modernization of the Service’s permitting system,” said Sara Parker Pauley, President of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. “The move to electronic permitting will assist in the sustainable use and management of wildlife by the state fish and wildlife agencies. The association appreciated the Service seeking the input of the state fish and wildlife agencies on the development of this system. This cooperation reflects the strong relationship that the state fish and wildlife agencies and the association have with the Service.” “The Louisiana alligator industry is very excited about the modernization of the Service’s permitting system,” said Stephen Sagrera, President of the Louisiana Alligator Farmers and Ranchers Association. “The faster permitting time of the new electronic system will help U.S. producers of sustainable wildlife products to better compete in fast-paced global markets.” “Permits from the Service are integral to the work of many ornithologists, so we are excited about the new ePermits system,” said Laura Bies, Executive Director of The Ornithological Council. “This new system has the potential to reduce the paperwork burden for researchers and scientists, and the Ornithological Council looks forward to its implementation.” By applying for permits, the public helps conserve and protect imperiled species throughout the world. Additionally, some permits promote conservation efforts by authorizing scientific research, generating data, or allowing wildlife management and rehabilitation activities to go forward. To apply for permits through the Service’s new platform or to obtain more information regarding the permitting process, visit: fws.gov/epermits. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  7. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The Ornithological Council offered testimony during a virtual listening session held by the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) to gather information to assist in the development of regulations for birds not bred for use in research under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The testimony offered by Laura Bies, Executive Director of the OC, noted that the additional regulations for birds not bred for research are not necessary, given the current level of regulations already in place for these birds and recommended that APHIS ensure that any additional burden on researchers is balanced by a commensurate increase in protection. Bies provided four recommendations for APHIS to consider as the rulemaking progresses: - Exclude wild birds studies in the wild from regulation - Exclude offspring of non-exempt birds that breed in captivity from regulation - Consult with experts regarding housing and husbandry standards - Exempt field surgery from regulation OC also submitted more lengthy written testimony, providing additional details about our recommendations, which is attached below. Read more about the forthcoming regulations here. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support! OCcommentsOct2020.pdf
  8. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The Ornithological Council submitted comments to the Animal Care program within USDA’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service regarding guidance the program released last month, clarifying the definition of “field study “within the context of the Animal Welfare Act. The draft policy aims to assist research institutions in determining whether an activity involving free-living wild animals in their natural habitat meets the regulatory definition of “field study.” The proposed policy describes criteria that research facilities could use to identify activities that are invasive, harmful, or that materially alter animal behavior, and provides examples of activities that are and are not field studies. The comments submitted by the Ornithological Council note that, without clear guidance on what is or is not a field study, the application of the term - and thus whether or not the Animal Welfare Act applies to research - has been inconsistent in the past. It notes that the examples provided in the draft policy are helpful, but urges APHIS to go further and provide either definitions or examples of key terms within the definition of “field study.” The OC's comments are attached below. Read more about the draft policy here. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support! final OC comments on field study policy Oct. 2020.pdf
  9. UPDATE: Nomination deadline extended until Nov. 6. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The National Academies’ Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) is forming a new standing committee to inform future updates or additions to The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (the Guide). The Guide is a leading guidance document that elaborates upon the underlying philosophy and basic principles for appropriate care of research animals. This Guide discusses field investigations in a very cursory manner, but is nonetheless used by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees in assessing research protocols for field studies. ILAR is taking nominations for the new standing committee until Nov. 6 The input of wildlife biologists would be very valuable to ILAR, the Guide did not address wildlife biology until recent revisions and even then only in a very cursory and broad manner. Ornithologists are encouraged to submit themselves or colleagues for the standing committee. See below for more information about the process and a link to submit nominations. If you do submit a nomination, the Ornithological Council would love to know (laurabiesoc@gmail.com). From the National Academies: Nominate Experts: Standing Committee for the Care and Use of Animals in Research The National Academies’ Institute for Laboratory Animal Research is seeking nominations of experts to serve on a new standing committee to inform future updates or additions to The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (the Guide). Now in its 8th edition, the Guide is one of the most well-known documents in the animal care and use field and serves as the basis for accreditation of institutions worldwide. The standing committee will aim to provide a venue for the exchange of ideas and knowledge sharing among federal government agencies, academic communities, the private sector, and other stakeholders engaged in animal research, research training, experimentation, biological testing or for related purposes or other special categories involving research animals. A committee of experts will be appointed by the National Academies, drawing members from the academic, government, private, and non-profit sectors. The interdisciplinary committee will require members to be scientists and veterinarians with training in Laboratory Animal Medicine and knowledge, expertise, and current experience with animal research under captive or natural conditions, and relevant to: regulatory and compliance matters biodiversity conservation the care, use and welfare of laboratory, domestic, agricultural and/or terrestrial and aquatic wild animal (e.g. cephalopods and polar species), privately owned animals (e.g. companion animals, pets) species other special categories involving research animals basic and translational sciences One Health research training biological testing other research and teaching activities. The nominations deadline is Tuesday, October 13, 2020. Nominees should be available to attend a meetings (virtually) as early as November 2020. In forming the committee, we seek to include individuals who are at different stages of their careers, including junior faculty and senior investigators, as well as those from underrepresented groups. Self-nominations are also welcomed. Make your nomination(s) today! Link to submit nominations: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5897789/Call-for-Nominations-Standing-Committee-for-the-Care-and-Use-of-Animals-in-Research?mc_cid=fd3b54af25&mc_eid=080f9a36fc About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  10. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that they are downlisting red-cockaded woodpeckers from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The agency cited partnerships with both the Department of Defense and the U.S. Forest Service, along with more than 30 other public and private organizations, as being key to the recovery. First listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Conservation Act of 1969, the precursor to the ESA, after a century of habitat loss reduced the bird’s range to only a few states, red-cockaded woodpeckers now range across 11 states. Estimates from the late 1970s found 1,470 breeding clusters, or groups of cavity trees used by a group of woodpeckers for nesting and roosting. That number has risen to 7,800 clusters in recent years. The USFWS is also considering adopting a rule that will prohibit incidental take of red-cockaded woodpeckers from actions that would result in the further habitat loss or degradation, such as activities that would harass red-cockaded woodpeckers during the breeding season and the insecticide use near clusters. The agency will be accepting comments on the proposal for 60 days, once the announcement is published in the Federal Register. Read more in the USFWS’s press release. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  11. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. While the COVID pandemic may have canceled field seasons, moved conferences online, and caused many of us to shelter at homes for prolonged periods, the Ornithological Council has been busy over the past several months. This update will give you a sense of what we’ve been up to... Long-time Executive Director Ellen Paul retired in May and Laura Bies, formerly with The Wildlife Society, took her place. Now in a half-time position, Bies has been working to update the OC’s website, meet with key partners, and otherwise continue the important work that Paul had underway. Recently, OC staff has worked to update the permitting information on our website. We have also released an updated version of A Guide to the Permits and Procedures for Importing Bird Products into the United State for Scientific Research and Display. This extensive guide, which was thoroughly updated this year, provides a step-by-step guide for ornithologists who are importing birds or bird products into the U.S. for research and display, including template documents and checklists to follow. The Import Guide is available to download for free from the Ornithological Council’s website at BIRDNET.org, as a service to the ornithological community. We have also posted a number of articles on OrnithologyExchange recently, to keep ornithologists up to date on policy issues that may affect them. You can read them all in the ‘News From the Ornithological Council’ forum. If you have a question about a permitting or animal welfare issue, do not hesitate to reach out to the Ornithological Council. We’re available to help members of our ten societies navigate challenges with securing the necessary permits for their work or with gaining IACUC approval for their research. The Ornithological Council has recently faced financial challenges, related mostly to the withdrawal from the OC of the American Ornithological Society on July 1. While their exit has had large financial repercussions for the OC, we have adjusted staffing and the services we offer so that the OC can continue to serve the ornithological community. However, we still need your help. If you’d like to support our important work, please visit our website, BIRDNET.org, and scroll down to the ‘donate’ button at the bottom of the screen - or simply follow this link. We truly appreciate your contributions, as they allow us to continue to serve the ornithological community. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our ten member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  12. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) released a proposed policy document, “Research Involving Free-living Wild Species In Their Natural Habitat,” to assist research institutions in determining whether an activity involving free-living wild animals in their natural habitat meets the regulatory definition of “field study.” The proposed policy describes criteria that research facilities could use to identify activities that are invasive, harmful, or that materially alter animal behavior. The proposed policy provides examples of activities that are and are not field studies. Under the policy, activities involving free-living wild animals in their natural habitat that meet the definition of a field study and are not regulated under the Animal Welfare Act include: Activities that do not involve an invasive procedure and that do not harm or materially alter the behavior of an animal. Activities in which animals are temporarily held captive in a manner that does not harm or materially alter their behavior and the animals are subsequently released. Activities in which animal handling does not cause harm or physical or behavioral alterations that materially impair function. Procedures including handling, restraint, capture and containment that are not invasive and do not harm or materially alter the behavior of the study animal, such as but not limited to: ear tagging using routine methods (for most species), minimally invasive placement of microchips and radio collars, or collecting small samples of peripheral blood or tissues resulting in minimal impact to the animal. Activities involving free-living wild animals in their natural habitat that do not meet the definition of “field study” and therefore must follow AWA requirements include: A study that involves an invasive procedure or that harms an animal, such as but not limited to: intra-cardiac blood collections arterial/venous cut downs surgical procedures Procedures designed to cause the death of an animal by methods other than those that meet the AWA regulatory definition for “euthanasia” Procedures that materially alter the behavior or impair the function of an animal under study, such as but not limited to: removing an animal’s digit that is necessary for digging/climbing partial amputation of an animal’s tail that is used for digging/climbing use of hormones or pheromones to change mating or migration patterns other than for wildlife management activities To read the full policy, click here. APHIS is accepting comments until 12 October, online or in writing to Docket No. APHIS-2020-0087, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737-1238. If you have feedback on the examples provided by APHIS in the proposed policy that could be useful to the Ornithological Council as we develop our comments on the proposal, please contact Laura Bies at laurabiesoc@gmail.com. Background: A 2017 report by the Government Accountability Office audit, entitled “Animal Use in Federal Research,” recommended that the provide research facilities with clear criteria for identifying field studies covered under the Animal Welfare Act regulations. The criteria would cover studies that facilities are required to include in the annual report of animal use submitted to APHIS, as well as studies that are not required to be reported. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support! Photo credit: Noah Kahn
  13. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. From the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Critical to Scientific Discovery and Innovation, Biological Collections Need Strategy, Action Center, and Increased Investment News Release | September 10, 2020 WASHINGTON — The sustainability of the nation’s biological collections is under threat, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Biological collections — living and natural history (non-living) specimens, biological materials, and data in museums, stock centers, research centers, and universities — need long-term financial sustainability, digitization, recruitment and support of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades in order to continue serving science and society. Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century says these collections are a critical part of the nation’s science and innovation infrastructure and a fundamental resource for understanding the natural world. Without enhanced investments and strategic leadership, many small collections could be lost, and even large collections will face challenges in keeping their doors open to the scientific community and the public. “Many biological collections are at a critical juncture,” said James Collins, co-chair of the committee that wrote the report and Virginia M. Ullman Professor of Natural History and the Environment at Arizona State University. “They are a cornerstone of research and education related to past and present life on Earth. Our study found that biological collections need increased investment to serve us in the way we expect, while at the same time expanding their potential for new uses related to science and society.” Shirley Pomponi, committee co-chair and research professor at Florida Atlantic University Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, added, “Strategic planning, coordination, and knowledge-sharing are critical for the community of collections directors, managers, and curators as they work to meet complex needs of society and the scientific community.” Benefitting Science and Society Biological collections produce a wide range of benefits for the scientific community beyond the specimens they hold, the report says. Collections are important resources for education, both in formal training for the science and technology workforce, and in informal learning through schools, citizen science programs, and adult learning. Biological collections underpin many basic science discoveries and innovations. Research using biological collections, for example, has advanced our understanding of biodiversity loss, global change, human diseases — including Zika and COVID-19 — and has led to important biotechnology laboratory techniques, including CRISPR and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. Securing Financial Sustainability The report says that sustained support will be paramount in keeping collections open, supporting their growth, and ensuring they are available for research. The needed investments in personnel, infrastructure, digitization, and other upgrades go beyond what annual budgets have historically covered. The National Science Foundation (NSF) should continue to provide stable, long-term funding for infrastructure maintenance and upgrades and expand its efforts to coordinate support with other funders. Individual collections should also explore new revenue streams, such as pay-for-use models, licensing systems, or charging for custom datasets, without creating costs that are prohibitive for researchers. Professional societies should collaborate to develop training for management and planning, and collection directors, curators, and managers should work with business strategists and communications experts to develop business models for financial sustainability and infrastructure. Cultivating a Highly Skilled Workforce The report says the workforce pipeline for biological collections is fundamentally different from the broader science workforce pipeline, and is poorly understood. Collections, host institutions, professional societies, and funders should collaborate to develop and strengthen the pipeline. The skill sets of collections managers and directors in particular should be broadened to include strategic leadership, fundraising and donor relations, personnel management, informal education, and public communication. Ensuring Access to Collections Making specimens and their data digitally accessible is one crucial component of achieving better access to collections. The report says that while the data that could be gathered and examined by digitizing biological collections are beyond current imagination in terms of size, quality, complexity, and value, gaps in support for digitization mean that collections data continue to be underused. The report recommends that the NSF Directorate for Biological Sciences fund the development of a permanent national cyber infrastructure to connect all types of biological collections, partnering with other directorates within NSF and other federal agencies. National Strategy and Collaboration As the nation’s largest supporter of biological collections infrastructure and management, NSF has a particularly pivotal role to play, the report says. NSF should lead efforts to develop a national vision and strategy, such as a Decadal Survey, for the growth of biological collections, their infrastructure, and their ability to serve a range of scientific and educational needs. As part of its expanded support for biological collections, NSF should also help establish a permanent National Action Center for Biological Collections to coordinate action, knowledge, resources, and data-sharing. This action center should help the collections community develop strategic efforts and nurture research, education, workforce training, evaluation, and business model development. The directorate should expand its partnerships more broadly across NSF and other federal agencies to maximize investment in this effort, and help spread the cost of these major endeavors. The report also says professional societies and associations can help address infrastructure needs by sharing strategic resources and information across the biological collections community and by creating a national registry to document collections in the U.S. and assess their infrastructure needs. Collection leaders should also develop strategic plans outlining their individual infrastructure needs. The study — undertaken by the Committee on Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century — was sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. They operate under an 1863 congressional charter to the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Lincoln. Contact: Megan Lowry, Media Officer Office of News and Public Information 202-334-2138; e-mail news@nas.edu About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our 10 member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  14. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. The Ornithological Council has released an updated version of A Guide to the Processes and Procedures for Importing Bird Products into the United State for Scientific Research and Display. This extensive guide, which was thoroughly updated this year, provides a step-by-step guide for ornithologists importing birds or bird products into the U.S. for research and display, including template documents and checklists to follow. The Import Guide is available to download for free from the Ornithological Council’s website at BIRDNET.org, as a service to the ornithological community. It contains sections on the import permitting requirements of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, USDA APHIS, and the Centers for Disease Control, as well as information about planning your travel and how to ship your specimen. It leads the ornithologist through the entire process, from paperwork to port and beyond. In addition to the hard-and-fast rules and requirements, this guide also offers best practices and helpful hints. The guide will be updated regularly as agency permitting requirements change, keeping ornithologists in compliance with the many laws and regulations governing the import of bird products. If you have any questions after reading the Import Guide or find areas that require further clarification, please contact Laura Bies (laurabiesoc@gmail.com), Executive Director of the Ornithological Council. About the Ornithological Council The Ornithological Council is a consortium of 10 scientific societies of ornithologists; these societies span the Western Hemisphere and the research conducted by their members spans the globe. Their cumulative expertise comprises the knowledge that is fundamental and essential to science-based bird conservation and management. The Ornithological Council is financially supported by our ten member societies and the individual ornithologists who value our work. If the OC’s resources are valuable to you, please consider joining one of our member societies or donating directly at Birdnet.org. Thank you for your support!
  15. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 10 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. FROM APHIS: Import Alert: HPAI restrictions for avian commodities originating from or transiting Australia Issuance Date: August 4, 2020 Effective date: July 24, 2020 Effective July 24, 2020, and until further notice, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Veterinary Services (VS) is restricting the importation of poultry, commercial birds, ratites, avian hatching eggs, unprocessed avian products and byproducts, and certain fresh poultry products from Australia. Any of these commodities originating from or transiting through Australia are prohibited, based on the diagnosis of highly pathogenic avian influenza in domestic birds. Under these restrictions, processed avian products and byproducts originating from or transiting Australia imported as cargo must be accompanied by an APHIS import permit and/or government certification confirming that the products were treated according to APHIS requirements. Processed avian products and byproducts for personal use from or transiting through Australia which may enter in passenger baggage and does not have a thoroughly cooked appearance, or is not shelf-stable as a result of APHIS approved packaging and cooking (i.e. packaged in hermetically sealed containers and cooked by a commercial method after such packing to produce articles that are shelf stable without refrigeration), must also be accompanied by a APHIS import permit and/or government certification confirming that the products/byproducts were treated according to APHIS requirements. Unprocessed avian products and byproducts originating from or transiting through Australia will not be permitted to enter the United States. This includes hunter harvested, non-fully finished avian trophies and meat. Importation of poultry, commercial birds, ratites, and hatching eggs will be prohibited. However pet and zoo birds, pigeons and doves, may be imported under an APHIS import permit, and will be subject to a 30-day quarantine at the New York Animal Import Center in Newburgh, NY or the Miami Animal Import Center in Miami, FL. These restrictions will be updated as additional epidemiological information is obtained. Current information can be found on the APHIS website: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-and-animal-product-import- information/animal-and-animal-products-imports
×
×
  • Create New...