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Ellen Paul

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  1. The House Natural Resources Committee subcommittee on Waters, Oceans, and Wildlife will hold a hearing on this discussion draft on Thursday, 13 June 2019. The witnesses will be: Mr. Paul Schmidt Consulting for Conservation Retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Palmyra, VA Dr. Amanda D. Rodewald Garvin Professor; Senior Director of Conservation Science Cornell Lab of Ornithology Ithaca, NY Mr. Stan Senner Vice President for Bird Conservation National Audubon Society Washington, DC Mr. Alexander K. Obrecht Energy & Regulatory Attorney BakerHostetler Denver, CO
  2. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. Congressman Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) has circulated a discussion draft of legislation that would "amend the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to affirm that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act’s prohibition on the unauthorized take or killing of migratory birds includes incidental take by covered commercial activities, and to direct the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to make a rule establishing a permitting program authorizing and regulating such incidental take, and for other purposes." The discussion draft provides that ‘covered commercial activity’ and ‘covered commercial activities’ mean an industry or type of commercial activity that the Secretary determines cause significant harm to migratory birds including: oil, gas, and wastewater disposal pits; methane or other gas burner pipes; ‘communication towers; electric transmission and distribution lines; and wind and solar power generation facilities. It would authorize a permitting program that would limit the amount of authorized take and require the use of best practices or technologies that are deemed practical and effective. It would also require mitigation measures, including mitigation fees. Even if this bill is eventually introduced and even if it is passed by the House, it has little chance of getting through the Senate, given that the Senate majority leader is blocking virtually all legislation coming from the House or Senate legislation proposed by Democrats. LowenthalDiscussionDraft2019.pdf
  3. The Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture at Mississippi State University (MSU), is seeking applications for a full time, 9-month tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant/Associate Professor rank. This person will be involved in research, teaching, and service. LOCATION: This position is on the MSU campus, located in Starkville, Mississippi. A description of the College of Forest Resources (CFR), the Forest and Wildlife Research Center (FWRC), Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station (MAFES) and the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture can be found at http://www.cfr.msstate.edu/wildlife. STARTING: Fall 2019 or as negotiated RESPONSIBILITIES: The Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture (WFA) seeks a dynamic scholar specializing in wildlife-habitat relationships that yield management applications for public and private stakeholders. Some potential fields of interest include, but are not limited to, species-habitat associations, habitat management and restoration, fire ecology, disturbance ecology, forest ecology, and management of working landscapes. In addition to these areas of interest, we encourage applicants to identify opportunities to build on existing departmental expertise and/or expand the department in new directions. The applicant should be a broadly trained wildlife ecologist that can contribute to a diverse faculty group and demonstrate how their research and teaching program will complement and enrich the department. The primary responsibilities of this position will be the development of a productive, externally-funded, and nationally/internationally recognized research program, effective mentoring of graduate and undergraduate students, and teaching within the WFA program. Teaching responsibilities may include 2-3 undergraduate/graduate courses per year consistent with the candidate expertise and departmental need. The position will be a 50% teaching and 50% research appointment. Mississippi State University is ranked as one of the top research institutions in the United States. The Carnegie Institute has designated MSU as a "higher research activity" doctoral granting institution. We are also ranked among the nation's top 100 research institutions based on the most recent National Science Foundation survey. The 35-member faculty within the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture leads one of the most productive research programs in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University. The department is well-known for its highly collegial and interdisciplinary faculty, post-doctoral fellows, research and extension associates that help make the department one of the premier institutions for applied wildlife and fisheries science in the nation. As one of the fastest growing undergraduate programs in the region, our 300 undergraduate students concentrate in wildlife agriculture science, human-wildlife interactions, conservation biology, wildlife veterinary medicine, conservation law enforcement, and wildlife, fisheries and aquaculture science. The department also houses 60 graduate students across a variety of programs, with nearly 100% job placement rate following receipt of a graduate degree. Located in Starkville, MS, Mississippi State is the centerpiece of a growing college town with a vibrant and diverse community and economy, a low cost-of-living, main street family atmosphere and connections to over a hundred thousand acres of national forests, national wildlife refuges, and state recreational lands. For more information on the Starkville community visit: https://www.starkville.org/ QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. with expertise in wildlife ecology and/or related discipline. Excellence in communication and organizational skills, peer-reviewed publications, and a commitment to service are expected. The candidate should show the ability to collaborate with diverse scientific disciplines, various stakeholder groups, and federal and state natural resource agencies to support long-term partnerships. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Preferred characteristics include postdoctoral or agency research experience, procurement of extramural funds to accomplish research, mentoring of graduate students, strong quantitative skills and teaching experience. Preference will be given to candidates whose research focuses on wildlife habitat management and naturally crosses disciplinary lines. APPLY: Applications must be submitted online http://explore.msujobs.msstate.edu/cw/en-us/job/498650/assistant-or-associate-professor and should include: 1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) statement of research philosophy, 4) statement of teaching philosophy, 5) official transcripts, and 6) programmatic vision statement how your research program will build on existing departmental expertise or expand the department in new directions. Letters of recommendation will be requested internally. Please send contact information for three references to: Angela Hill Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture Mississippi State University angela.c.hill@msstate.edu For additional information on the position announcement, contact search chair Dr. Kristine Evans (662-325-3167) or email at kristine.evans@msstate.edu Mississippi State University is an AA/EEO employer MSU is an equal opportunity employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, ethnicity, sex (including pregnancy and gender identity), national origin, disability status, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We always welcome nominations and applications from women, members of any minority group, and others who share our passion for building a diverse community that reflects the diversity in our student population.
  4. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. In order to better serve the trade community, the USFWS Office of Law Enforcement has created a new CITES permit issuing office in the Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas). For shipments that require a CITES permit (3-200-26, 3-200-28, 3-200-52, 3-200-66, 3-200-73) and are being exported from ports located within the Southwest Region, you may send the permit applications to: Houston - Designated 19241 David Memorial Drive, Suite 175 Shenandoah, Texas 77385 Phone: (281) 230-7225 Fax: (281) 230-7227
  5. Registration has opened! Early registration ends August 31. Abstract submission has opened!
  6. The two complaints are attached to the original post. The M-Opinion to which they are objecting is linked in that same post. What other literature are you looking for?
  7. Melinda - no, I checked just yesterday. Still no hearing scheduled or decision issued.
  8. http://www.cvent.com/events/2019-afo-wos-joint-meeting/location-fc644f2542184eba9fe3b1d37928e0fd.aspx And the plenary speakers have been announced: Robert Curry Dr. Curry is a native of Massachusetts with additional family roots in Nova Scotia. He completed his undergraduate education at Dartmouth College (1979) under the mentorship of Dick Holmes, followed by doctoral study at the University of Michigan (1987) focusing on social and conservation ecology of Galápagos mockingbirds supervised by Peter Grant. He conducted postdoctoral work on Florida Scrub-Jays with Glen Woolfenden and John Fitzpatrick before joining the faculty at Villanova University (1991). Dr. Curry has mentored research by more than 70 Villanova Masters students and undergraduates; their work has involved mimids and other Neotropical birds; Florida Scrub-Jays; the world's one herbivorous spider; and, especially, Carolina and Black-capped chickadees and their hybrids. He served as President of the Wilson Ornithological Society in 2014-2016 after completing multiple terms as an Officer and member of Council. Dr. Curry and his wife Susie have two children, and they eagerly await the arrival of two granddaughters in 2019. As the Margaret Morse Nice Keynote, Dr. Curry will speak on “Transformation of familiar birds into model organisms: what chickadees can teach us” Much like the Song Sparrows that captivated Margaret Morse Nice, chickadees are charismatic backyard birds that we easily take for granted. Research concerning several North American chickadee species has, burgeoned in recent decades, yielding insights about fundamental problems in ornithology-approaching what we have learned from their European relatives. The role of vocal behavior in chickadee mating systems has been examined thoroughly. "Our" chickadees are currently central among studies of social networks using technological tools that allow us to track movements and associations in space and time. Chickadees have contributed important insights concerning cognitive ecology and neuroethology. Long-term research within the northward-moving hybrid zone between Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees combines many of these elements, while also employing genomic approaches and Citizen Science data; this work has revealed influences of ongoing climate change and behavioral mechanisms on the dynamics of songbird hybridization. There is still much to learn from these familiar birds. Christina Riehl Christie has always been fascinated by a) animal social behaviors, and b) anything having to do with birds. Her main research project is a long-term study of the breeding behavior of the greater ani (a bizarre communally breeding cuckoo) in Panama, but she is interested in many questions involving the evolution and ecology of sociality and reproductive biology.
  9. UPDATE 14 May 2019 (excerpts from the Washington Post 10 May 2019): The Agriculture Department has dropped its demand that staff scientists label peer-reviewed research as “preliminary,” after angry protests followed a Washington Post story disclosing the policy. But the latest guidelines, released on Wednesday, for internally reviewing science within the department raise additional questions about scientific integrity, said non-USDA researchers who inspected the guide....This week, acting USDA chief scientist Chavonda Jacobs-Young released a memo that replaced the July policy. It requires the following language when disclaimers are necessary: “The findings and conclusions in this [publication/presentation/blog/report] are those of the author(s) and should not be construed to represent any official USDA or U.S. Government determination or policy.” ...even this language may not be needed: “Many journals have this statement on their mastheads. This expectation, that an article represents the views of the authors only, is indeed the standard.” ...Rebecca Boehm, an economist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a D.C.-based organization that advocates for scientists, said that “removing ‘preliminary’ from the disclaimer is a step in the right direction, but there still may be unnecessary obstacles preventing agency researchers from publishing their work in peer-reviewed journals.” ...Not every study published by a USDA scientist is required to have this disclaimer. Some research agencies at USDA, including the Agricultural Research Service, the Economic Research Service, the National Agricultural Statistics Service and the Forest Service have “agency-specific policies” that determine when a disclaimer is appropriate, said William Trenkle, the USDA scientific integrity officer. ...the department’s internal review process before scientists can publish results in journals. It lists several “flags” that may trigger additional scrutiny. Some flags, under the umbrella of “prominent issues,” include “significant” scientific advancements, the potential to attract media attention, and results that could influence trade or change USDA policy. ... Susan Offutt, who was the administrator of the Economic Research Service under presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, said the guide twists internal review “into a process by which policy officials get the final say on content.” Because researchers at the Economic Research Service publish statistics to aid policymakers, “just about any output” from that agency could be flagged, she said. USDA’s “interests apparently concern consistency with prevailing policy,” Offutt said, “not the public’s access to the best, unbiased science and analysis.” From the Washington Post, 19 April 2019: Researchers at the Agriculture Department laughed in disbelief last summer when they received a memo about a new requirement: Their finalized, peer-reviewed scientific publications must be labeled “preliminary.” The July 2018 memo from Chavonda Jacobs-Young, the acting USDA chief scientist, told researchers their reports published in scientific journals must include a statement that reads: “The findings and conclusions in this preliminary publication have not been formally disseminated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy.” A copy of the memo was obtained by The Washington Post and the USDA confirmed its authenticity. https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/04/19/usda-orders-scientists-say-published-research-is-preliminary/?utm_term=.e08bf8db6cf8 The policy may reflect an attempt to end-run the Information Quality Act, which pertains only to information disseminated by the federal government. That law, created at the behest of corporate anti-regulatory interests, has been a double-edged sword which has also been used by health and environmental groups to challenge the basis of federal agency policies and statements. This newest effort to strangle scientific information produced by scientists employed by federal agencies follows the requirement imposed by the Bush administration that requires scientists (in numerous agencies) to submit their work - including publications and presentations - to agency communications or other leadership offices prior to publication. In addition, the policy bans scientists from including “personal view” statements, language that federal employees have often used to distinguish research articles they author from policy documents issued by the agency. Such a statement might read, in part: “opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own,” as suggested by the National Institutes of Health.
  10. EXPERIENCED BIRD BANDERS IN CHARGE (6), MIST NET ASSISTANTS (6), and AVIAN SURVEYORS (6) needed from 18 August to 6 November (start and end dates mildly flexible) to study the stopover ecology of small passerines along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico (Alabama and Louisiana). BANDERS (minimum experience: 500 eastern songbirds banded and processed) need to have experience with banding large volumes of birds, be familiar with the aging and sexing of eastern species, be able to train and assist assistants in mist net extraction, and independently lead a small team. Also must be able to effectively communicate with project leader\site coordinator in completing tasks associated with the banding operation as well as oversee banding operation including other technicians. MIST NET ASSISTANT (minimum experience: 100 songbirds extracted from mist nets) duties include extracting birds from mist-nets. AVIAN SURVEYOR (minimum experience: ability to identify eastern songbirds by sight and sound) duties include identifying eastern species by sight and sound along a transect, conducting resource surveys, and mist net extraction. Additionally, opportunities may exist for all positions to assist with active research during the field season. All individuals are required to work 7 days a week, carry up to 10 pounds regularly, navigate difficult terrain, assist with data entry, arthropod sampling, fruit/flower counts, and fecal sample analysis, have the ability to work and live well with others in close quarters, have a good sense of humor, and be able to tolerate heat, venomous snakes, biting insects, and wet conditions. In addition to abundant experience, each bander will be compensated a total of $5,000 and each other position will receive $4,000 over the course of the season. Pretty nice housing is provided. In ONE Word document/PDF named in the following format: Lastname-Firstname (e.g. Zenzal-TJ.pdf) please send letter of interest, resume, and names, phone numbers, and email addresses of 3 references to Dr. T.J. Zenzal, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, 1102 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 or by email (preferred): MBRGhiring(AT)gmail.com Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. The University of Southern Mississippi conducts background checks on all job candidates upon acceptance of a contingent offer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or national origin. EOE/F/M/VETS/DISABILITY.
  11. HawkWatch International is hiring an Executive Director to lead the organization. The next leader of this growing organization must have: Enthusiasm for conservation, birds of prey, and the HWI mission Experience with business management for non-profit or NGO with staff of +/- 25 Science Foundation in raptor related biology and conservation, field sciences or academia Proven fund-raising capabilities Appreciation for the HWI mission is essential, as is inspiring others and bringing a high level of energy to the work of development, education and field operations. The successful individual will lead staff and volunteers to grow HWI’s capacity scientifically, educationally, and financially into a nationally and globally recognized conservation organization. The next leader must execute the strategic vision while building upon a team culture of trust and shared core values. Key for the successful candidate is experience leading and growing a similarly sized and focused organization. HWI Staff and Board are keen to continue recent growth and build upon the strong foundation of this 30+ year old organization. Staff and Board desire a leader that understands how to manage an organization, and has the energy to be involved in working towards a shared vision while creating independence by building trust. This individual will ideally have a science background, preferably in raptor biology or closely linked experience in conservation, education, ecology, or ornithology. This role will lead an organization with a focus on raptor-oriented research and education. Experience in these areas is necessary in order to direct the work and successfully network with partners, stakeholders, the greater raptor community and the general public. Long term growth is highly dependent on a leader with proven fund-raising capabilities, strong networking skills and a willingness to reach out to donors. The Executive Director is the spokesperson for the collective team and must be comfortable building relationships at multiple geographic scales. A key success factor will be experience with development strategies and an action-oriented focus to deliver. Opportunities to grow both nationally and internationally are substantial and necessitate a well-cultivated pipeline of major donors. HawkWatch International is poised to dramatically increase its impact, creative approaches, partnerships, and overall reach. We are looking for an Executive Director who can envision the HWI of the future and is able to lead the charge to successfully realizing that vision. Requirements Advanced degree in science, business administration, communications, or relevant field. Knowledge and experience in environmental conservation, ecology, ornithology, and birding. Proven experience as Executive Director or in a similar managerial position. Significant experience in developing successful strategies and plans. Proven success in fundraising and networking. In-depth knowledge of nonprofit management, governance principles, and managerial best practices. Familiarity and comfort with monthly financials and annual audits. Aptitude for analytical thinking, capable of creative solutions to solve problems thoroughly and rapidly. Impeccable organizational skills, leadership abilities and the skill of collaboration. Exceptional oral and written communication abilities and public speaking skills. Ability to work from Salt Lake City, Utah Hours and Compensation Full-time (exempt), salaried staff position. Starting salary of $65,000–$ 75,000 (depending on experience and education), with excellent benefits package, including medical, dental and matching retirement plan. To apply: Send cover letter, CV/resume and contact information (phone #) for 3 references to Paul Parker, Executive Director, by April 19, 2019. Preferred start date: July 1, 2019. We encourage applicants of diverse backgrounds, ethnicities, etc. as we value a diverse and inclusive HawkWatch community. For more information on HawkWatch and our programs, visit www.hawkwatch.org.
  12. Common Loon Project in northern Wisconsin requires 3 outdoor-loving, physically fit volunteers to assist in a 26-year investigation of territory acquisition and defense. Applicants should be available for all or most of period 15 May – 10 August 2019. Interns will visit study lakes via solo canoe to identify loons from colored leg bands, observe and record territorial and breeding behavior, and locate and GPS nests. Late in the season, they will assist in nocturnal capture, marking, and taking of blood and feather samples in adults and chicks. Successful applicants must have a car that gets 30 mpg or better, be able to swim well, have good hearing and vision, have a strong work ethic, be meticulous about taking notes, be able to work with others or alone, and have a love of outdoor conditions. Experience with bird identification, canoes, and motorboats helpful but not essential. Housing and gasoline reimbursement provided. Send resume and list of 3+ references ASAP (but not later than 15 May) via e-mail to: Dr. Walter Piper, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA, 92866 (e-mail: wpiper@chapman.edu). For more info, see web page at: http://www.chapman.edu/~wpiper/
  13. UPDATE 1 APR 2019 The government has now filed its reply brief responding to the plaintiffs' (several states, in one case, and several conservation organizations in the other case) brief opposing the government's motion to dismiss the case. No hearing date has been set; it is possible that the court (the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York) will decide the motions without oral arguments. If the cases survive the government's motion to dismiss, the case will go forward in the U.S. District Court. If not, it would be up to the plaintiffs to file an appeal in the U.S. Circuit Court.
  14. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-47515175 The building may have been insured but the family that lives there and runs the observatory lost everything. If you want to help, there is a gofundme here https://www.gofundme.com/helping-the-parnaby-family-after-bird-obs-fire?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=fb_dn_postdonate_r&fbclid=IwAR0yJcl0i5M7Sysgv3SKXV06cf6f3ONPsm6wWPIsBqEJiOy6Cq_WIgp-CXE
  15. The Waterbird Society is pleased to announce that its 43d annual conference and general meeting will be held at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The university is located in Princess Anne, Maryland. Please mark the dates on your calendar: Registration opens: May 1 Abstract submission opens: May 1 Arrive, Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 6 Paper Sessions, Posters: Thursday, November 7 - Saturday November 9 Special all-day event for the Waterbird Society Diversity Program: Friday, November 8 Closing Banquet: Saturday November. 9 The conference website is under construction so please check back for additional information. In the meantime, if you have not already done so, it would be exceptionally helpful for planning purposes if you would answer a very short, two-question survey to indicate your interest in attending and to gauge the need for various transportation options. Please note that the call for symposia has already been issued: The Waterbird Society is calling for anyone who would like to propose a Symposium or Workshop for this meeting. A symposium may be a full day (~14 presentations) or half day (7 presentations). Likewise, workshops can be a full day, half day, or a couple of hours. Please direct any questions about symposia and workshops to Dave Moore (dave.moore2@canada.ca; proposals due by 01 May, 2019).
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