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BirdLife International

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Everything posted by BirdLife International

  1. This year, we held the first ever global summit for flyways conservation, uniting a panoply of countries and sectors. On World Migratory Bird Day, we’re sharing some of the most important decisions we made in order to ensure the miracle of migration will be there for future generations to enjoy.View the full article
  2. Wind energy has an incredibly green image. Yet placed in the wrong locations, wind turbines can harm birds and bats. The solution: strong science and technology that helps to avoid this unnecessary damageView the full article
  3. Between September 26th-28th, over 200 members of the BirdLife family flocked to Wallonia, Belgium for the 2018 BirdLife General Partnership Meeting. These landmark meetings are where we gather to elect our Government and review our conservation strategy for the years to come.View the full article
  4. Not all countries have the resources to conduct big scientific surveys. A pioneering new project across three African countries proves that local volunteers are an effective way to monitor the health of birds and the habitats they live in.View the full article
  5. With the conclusion of one of BirdLife’s most ambitious projects to date, ‘LIFE EuroSAP: Coordinated Efforts for International Species Recovery’, we reflect back on a mammoth three-year collaboration to change the fate of 16 threatened bird species.View the full article
  6. BirdLife International

    State of Africa’s Birds

    Africa is a continent that is expanding fast, both population-wise, and in terms of wealth and technology. At first glance, this latest review of the continent’s birds presents a pessimistic reflection of this expansion. View the full article
  7. BirdLife International

    Obituary: bird activist Joe Sultana 1939-2018

    A champion of conservation in Malta, and more widely the Mediterranean, Joe Sultana passed away on Tuesday 11th of September at the age of 78. Throughout his life, his passion and dedication for conservation inspired action both within Malta and internationally.View the full article
  8. For more than a decade, the Albatross Task Force has been striving to make fishing industries seabird-safe. Working with communities, governments and on board boats, it has become one of BirdLife’s most successful programmes. Here’s what it has achieved in the past year alone.View the full article
  9. Neighbouring BirdLife partners, RSPB (UK) and BirdWatch Ireland, have joined forces to put Europe’s rarest breeding seabird, the roseate tern, on the road to recovery.View the full article
  10. Every issue, we talk to a BirdLife scientist about a recent paper they have been working on which has contributed to our knowledge of birds and conservation. This time, our Chief Scientist, Stuart Butchart, discusses a newly published paper on the state of the world’s raptors.View the full article
  11. After the recent fires across the Algarve, BirdLife’s Portuguese partner, SPEA, sounds the alarm for the region’s important Bonelli’s Eagle population.View the full article
  12. Eight bird species, including two species of macaw, look set to have their extinctions confirmed following a robust new assessment of Critically Endangered species. The findings reveal a worrying new trend: for the first time, mainland extinctions are outpacing island extinctionsView the full article
  13. For millennia, vultures have aided humans in their role as nature’s rapid-response clean-up crew. Now, Kenya is repaying the favour with a new rapid-response unit to combat vulture poisoning: part of an ambitious project to save Africa’s vultures.View the full article
  14. The Helmeted Hornbill is Critically Endangered, largely due to hunting, but a new plan aims to save the species.View the full article
  15. Birds colliding with windows are an upsetting symptom of human encroachment on nature. But the barriers we put up between ourselves and the natural world are part of a larger problem.View the full article
  16. Can we end deforestation once and for all? Here’s why we all need to get behind the Trillion Trees Vision.View the full article
  17. One of the last areas of untouched wilderness in the world could face irreversible damage. Building a hydroelectric dam in Selous Game Reserve contravenes Tanzanian environmental laws for this World Heritage Site, as well as threatening Endangered bird species.View the full article
  18. Electronic tracking devices have transformed our insight into the lives of birds at sea. Globe-trotting ornithologist Dr Michael Brooke describes some of the most fascinating seabird discoveries from his new book “Far from Land – The Mysterious Lives of Seabirds”.View the full article
  19. The most distinctive feature of the Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros) is its spectacular horn or “casque”. View the full article
  20. In the 1970s, the Spanish population of White-headed duck was brought to the verge of extinction. Its stunning recovery shows why Species Action Plans are essential for the survival of threatened species.View the full article
  21. After ten years of conservation efforts, one of Sweden’s rarest breeding bird species, the Black-tailed Godwit, is making a stunning recovery.View the full article
  22. Every year proceeds from the British Birdwatching Fair, dubbed the ‘Glastonbury of birdwatching’, go towards a conservation project, chosen and managed by BirdLife. We look back at the successes of the past 30 years.View the full article
  23. Road construction through Belarus’ Almany Mires is devastating ancient bogs in one of the country’s Important Bird & Biodiversity Areas.View the full article
  24. In the opening episode of the Conservation Careers Podcast, Nick Askew speaks with our CEO Patricia Zurita. Patricia shares her career story so far, and how she got from her childhood in Ecuador to be the only female leader of a big international conservation charity.View the full article
  25. In North Maluku, Indonesia, traders are using more and more complex methods to trap and market parrots, and many species are now globally threatened with extinction. BirdLife Partner Burung Indonesia united national parks, conservation groups and police investigators to develop a plan of action.View the full article
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