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Found 7 results

  1. Subtropical rainforests can be found from the mountains to the coast in south-eastern Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales. Only small patches of once extensive forests remain at lower elevations but larger tracts still occur along the escarpment of the Great Dividing Range. The majority of these rainforests are now protected in National Parks and Nature Reserves and the most important have been afforded world heritage status. Many of the sounds of this album were recorded in areas around the author's home near Mullumbimby on the New South Wales north coast. Others were recorded in rainforests elsewhere in the region. The tracks evoke the changing moods of subtropical rainforests, progressing from the reverberating dawn chorus through the day with rushing streams, dripping foliage, thunderstorms and sudden downpours to the sounds of the evening and night. Each track features a series of calls of the bird, frog and mammal species that characterise rainforests of the region. Natural sequences of two well known bird songsters, endemic to the area, Albert's Lyrebird and the Rufous Scrub-bird, are presented as complete tracks. Other tracks have been compiled to contrast the local distribution of some species. For example the Sphagnum Frog, an inhabitant of mountain streams and soaks is included with the Little Shrike-thrush, most common in lowland forests and the Stuttering Frog, mainly confined to streams on elevated plateaus is included with the Black Bittern, seldom found far from the middle and lower reaches of coastal streams. Many species of rainforest birds, frogs and mammals are cryptic and difficult to observe and their calls are often the only indication of their presence. Learning calls can be an invaluable method for detecting cryptic species and it is hoped that these tracks may provide a stimulus for further investigation of the potential of this dimension. Track length indicates quick access to each independent track including National Parks (NP) and Nature Reserves (NR) where listed species may be found.
  2. The bird calls on this CD include 82 species, most of which were recorded in the vicinity of Broome Bird Observatory. Forty four of these species are shorebirds, and it is likely that some of their calls, especially those of migrating flocks, have not been published previously. Most bird enthusiasts will know that observing shorebirds is a highly visual experience, but may not be aware of the wide range of their calls. CD cover: Australian Bird Calls - Broome RegionBroome Bird Observatory is on the shores of Roebuck Bay and lies 25 road kilometres to the south east of Broome township. The large congregations of shorebirds at Roebuck Bay are internationally well known. Each year enthusiasts with an interest in shorebirds and their migration, come to the bird observatory to experience the phenomenon of the incredible number of waders comprising many species. The calls of the shorebirds on this CD are mainly the result of a six week visit during March/April 1999 to record single species flocks as they departed on their annual migration to the northern hemisphere, where they breed. The CD also features the calls of 40 species other than shorebirds, including all the mangrove species as well as a number of bush birds of the immediate region. Bird enthusiasts with an interest in calls of song birds will be amazed at just how different are the calls of some common species in this region compared with calls of the same species in other parts of Australia. English names and sequence follow Christidis and Boles, 1994 in the Taxonomy and Species of the Birds of Australia and its Territories. A useful adjunct to this CD is The Birds of Broome, 1995 published by the Broome Bird Observatory. Running time: 69 Minutes 2 seconds
  3. The Tropical North-east region of Australia enjoys a very diverse range of bird species, and includes many of this countries most interesting birds. The region is bounded in the south by Rockhampton (Tropic of Capricorn) , extends north to the top of Cape York and includes the Great Dividing Range. The Wet Tropics refers to the World Heritage area of tropical rainforest from Mt. Spec (north of Townsville) to the Big Tableland (south of Cooktown). The CD contains calls of 83 species. The region includes 18 endemic bird species and a feature of this CD is the presentation of a range of calls for this unique group. Species with amazing calls such as Great-billed Heron, Palm Cockatoo, Rufous and Lesser Sooty Owls, Yellow-billed Kingfisher, Red-bellied Pitta, Fernwren, Chowchilla, Frill-necked Monarch, Magnificent Riflebird, Trumpet Manucode and Tooth-billed and Golden Bowerbirds are presented. Other more difficult to see species include Southern Cassowary, Red-necked Crake, Little Kingfisher, Atherton Scrubwren, Green-backed Honeyeater, Yellow-legged Flycatcher, Northern Scrub-robin and Blue-faced Parrot-Finch. Where possible, a number of calls of each species are featured. This makes the listener aware of the repertoire of sounds many of the birds possess, particularly songbirds. This album features no music or spoken commentary. The natural calls of the birds of this region can be appreciated both as a source of pleasant sounds, or as a well documented reference source of many of the tropical north-east bird species, particularly those which are difficult to observe. A list of the species, with call description and behaviour notes, can be found inside the cover. For those people with a particular interest in any of the calls, further information can be obtained from the author. Birds Australia, the largest bird organisation in the country, endorses and recommends this CD to anybody interested in enjoying and knowing the calls of many of Australia's wonderful birds found only in this region. Total length: 73 minutes 22 seconds
  4. Tasmania has 12 endemic bird species: the Tasmanian Native-hen, Green Rosella, Forty-spotted Pardalote, Tasmanian Scrubwren, Scrubtit, Tasmanian Thornbill, Yellow Wattlebird, Yellow-throated Honeyeater, Strong-billed Honeyeater, Black-headed Honeyeater, Dusky Robin and Black Currawong. The CD features a range of calls for this unique group, along with those of a further 68 species, many of whose calls are different to their mainland cousins and particular attention has been paid to this aspect. Where possible, a range of calls of each species is presented, allowing the listener to become aware of the repertoire of sounds possessed by many of the birds, particularly songbirds. Ron Nagorcka, well known Tasmanian naturalist and composer, has supported this presentation by making a considerable number of calls available to make the selection more comprehensive. The album features no music or spoken commentary. The natural calls of Tasmania's birds can be appreciated both as a source of pleasant sounds, or as a well documented reference source of many of the island's bird species, particularly those that are difficult to observe. A list of the species, with call description and behaviour notes, can be found inside the cover. For those people with a particular interest in any of the calls, further information can be obtained from the author. Birds Australia, the largest bird organisation in the country, endorses and recommends this CD to anybody interested in enjoying and knowing the calls of many of Tasmania's wonderful birds. Total length: 73 minutes 51 seconds
  5. Experience amazing bush sounds as you are taken on a journey around Australia. This album of 52 separate recordings, blended together as a continuous sequence, provides an interesting composition of the author's experiences with sound recording on his numerous trips to all parts of Australia. This CD captures the timeless ambience of Australia as you move from rainforest to desert, mangroves to mallee and mountains to the sea. Hear the wonderful songs of birds in remote places, listen to the choruses of frogs in wetland habitats and marvel at the incredible calls of possums, dingoes and goannas. Tropical thunderstorms, the bubbling Artesian Basin bores, campfires and crashing waves interweave with the rustic nostalgia of windmills and steam trains in this amazing soundscape. The recordings are taken in natural surroundings and the CD is compiled as a continuous sound track. The sounds of the different scenarios give the feeling that you are actually there experiencing the many and varied noises of the Australian bush. The tracks merge into each other and there are no obvious fades. This CD has no music or spoken commentary. For those interested to know the track title and the location of each recording, the album is indexed. A map of Australia is included in the cover and the locality of each recording is provided. The numbers on the map can be cross referenced to the track list to allow the listener to know where the recording was taken (see below). Birds Australia, the largest bird organisation in the country, endorses and recommends this CD to people interested in hearing a selection of sound tracks of Australia's amazing bush sounds. Total length: 71 minutes 6 seconds
  6. Experience the evocative sounds of a significant number of Australia's bird species. Many of these birds have melodious songs and others have very interesting and unusual sounds. This selection of 57 species includes many that are well known such as Laughing Kookaburra, Superb Lyrebird, Australian Magpie, Willie Wagtail and Galah as well as the infrequently heard Emu. Others, including Crested Bellbird, Chiming Wedgebill and the rare Noisy Scrub-bird, live in remote places and their crystal clear melodious songs are most enjoyable. This album features no music or spoken commentary. The natural calls of the birds featured can be appreciated as a continuous revelry of bush sounds. For those interested to know the identity of the bird calling, the album is indexed. Information on species identification can be found inside the cover. A map of Australia is included in the cover and the locality of each recording is provided. The numbers on the map can be cross referenced to the track list to allow the listener to know where the recording was taken (see below). Birds Australia, the largest bird organisation in the country, endorses and recommends this CD to anybody interested to hear a range of calls of Australia's wonderful birds. Total Length: 72 minutes 24 seconds
  7. The south-western region of Australia (bounded by Geraldton in the north to Esperance in the south) has a wide range of habitats from wet forests to dry scrubland. Accordingly, the range of bird species is quite diverse. This region is host to 17 endemic species, some of which also occur in South Australia as far east as Eyre Peninsula. The CD features a range of calls for this unique group, including those of some birds that are difficult to see such as Noisy Scrub-bird, Western Bristlebird and Western Whipbird, but which have loud ear catching songs. The calls of some other birds unique to this region such as Carnaby's and Baudin's Black-Cockatoos, Western Rosella, Red-capped Parrot, Rufous Treecreeper, Blue-breasted and Red-winged Fairy-wrens, Western Thornbill, Western Wattlebird, Western Spinebill, Western Yellow and White-breasted Robins and Red-eared Firetail are also included. Calls of many of the more common birds are also part of the overall presentation. Where possible, a range of calls of each species is presented, allowing the listener to become aware of the repertoire of sounds possessed by many of the birds, particularly songbirds. This album has no music or spoken commentary. The natural calls of the birds of this region can be appreciated both as a source of pleasant sounds, or as a well documented reference source of many of south-western Australia's bird species. A list of the species, with call description and behaviour notes, can be found inside the cover. For those people with a particular interest in any of the calls, further information can be obtained from the author. This is another CD in the Australian Bird Call series and contains calls of 79 species. Birds Australia, the largest bird organisation in the country, endorses and recommends this CD to anybody interested in enjoying and knowing the calls of many of Australia's wonderful birds found in the temperate south-western region of Australia. Running time: 73 minutes 56 seconds
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