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Found 18 results

  1. AOU and COS are merging, forming the new American Ornithological Society (AOS) to serve ornithologists and advance ornithology in the 21st century. To go with our new name, we are developing a new image to reflect who we are and what we are about—and we would love to have input from the ornithology community. How do you think our new logo should look? We invite you to submit original AOS logo designs or concepts, whether they are polished graphics files or hand-drawn sketches. The winning design will receive a $500 prize. Deadline: Saturday, 15 October, at midnight EASTERN Submission: Please email your entry to Dr. Mark Hauber at markehauber@gmail.com Please submit an electronic file in jpg, png, gif, ai, or indd file format Submissions must include your name and email address Please include a short description of how the design represents AOS Guidelines: We are looking for a logo or logo concept that captures the essence of AOS as a new organization. Entries will be judged for the style, creativity, and impact of a design that can be used in the web, email, and print materials of AOS. Entries may optionally include the name American Ornithological Society and tagline Advancing Scientific Knowledge and Conservation of Birds. More about AOS: The mission of AOS will not depart from the complementary missions of AOU and COS: to advance the scientific understanding of birds and disseminate ornithological knowledge, to enrich ornithology as a profession and mentor young professionals, and to promote a rigorous scientific basis for the conservation of birds. AOS’s vision is to provide an inclusive and stimulating professional home for ornithologists that supports members at every career stage, from students through retirement; to produce scientific publications of the highest quality and make them available to the widest audiences possible; to host intellectually engaging and professionally vital meetings; to pursue a global perspective; and to inform public policy on all issues important to ornithology and ornithological collections. AOS’s long range goals are to: Sustain Scientific Impact Through Financial Support for Ornithological Research Publish the Highest Quality and Openly Accessible Ornithological Research Pursue Excellence in Organizing and Hosting Annual Conferences that Meet the Ever-Changing Needs of Ornithology and Ornithologists Excel In Professional Development for Members at All Stages of Their Careers Recognize and Promote Significant accomplishments in Ornithology Create and Connect a Vibrant Community of Ornithologists Throughout the Americas Individuals serving on the panel of appointed judges are not eligible to submit entries. The contest winner must relinquish all rights to the design to AOS, which will be the sole owner of rights to the design. AOS may employ a graphic designer to finalize the winning design submission into an official logo. Decisions of the judges will be final. Original post: https://amornithnews.com/2016/10/06/logo-contest-new-look-for-merged-society/
  2. COS members have spoken and have overwhelmingly approved the merger with AOU, with upwards of 85 percent in favor. More than 700 members cast ballots, exceeding 55 percent of COS membership. The final step in the decision process will be a vote by AOU Fellows on August 16. Learn more here! [see this post at American Ornithology News.] Brown Pelican by Paul J. Marto, Jr. Marto Photography
  3. Calling all members of the Cooper Ornithological Society: please vote now regarding the proposed merger with the American Ornithologists’ Union! We need to hear from you. Deadline: August 2. Burrowing Owls by travelwayoflife, CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons See this post at American Ornithology News.
  4. Members of the Cooper Ornithological Society are voting on the proposed merger with the American Ornithologists’ Union (deadline: August 2). Learn more here: http://americanornithology.org/content/aou-and-cos-merger-status
  5. What has the American Ornithology community been tweeting about all week? Find out in The @AmOrnith Review. See this post at American Ornithology News (and subscribe to stay in the loop!).
  6. What has the American Ornithology community been tweeting about all week? Find out by visiting The @AmOrnith Review (and subscribe for a weekly update!). See this post on American Ornithology News.
  7. Teachers, check out our compilation of educational resources for ornithology, featuring an array of teaching materials and photo collections (plus a pretty cool feather identification website). [See this post on American Ornithology News.] Public Domain via Pixabay
  8. Subscribe to American Ornithology News to stay up to date on news, events, conversations, resources, and opportunities from AOU and COS. American Robins by John James Audubon (detail), Public Domain
  9. The 2016 elections for COS Board of Directors is approaching. This year there are 5 nominees. Please see the attached file to read more about them. 2016 Board nominations.docx
  10. COS BOARD OF DIRECTORS NOMINATIONS 2015 The following 5 people (in alphabetical order) have agreed to be nominated for the Cooper Ornithological Society (COS) Board of Directors to serve from 2015 to 2018. Jen C. Owen is an Associate Professor at Michigan State University in the Departments of Fisheries and Wildlife and Large Animal Clinical Sciences. She received her B.S. in Wildlife Biology from University of Montana, Missoula in 1993 and her Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2004. Her early work focused on threatened and endangered species, including Mexican Spotted Owl and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher before developing a research program focused on the health and disease ecology of migratory birds. Her interdisciplinary research program addresses issues at the interface of wild bird, human, and environmental health and focuses in the areas of ecoimmunology, behavioral ecology, and conservation medicine. Along with collaborators and students, she has published 24 refereed papers. Her research has been funded from multiple agencies, including the National Science Foundation, United States Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. She is the member of several ornithological, ecological, and wildlife disease societies and has served her societies in a number of different roles. She served as the Editor of The Condor: Ornithological Applications and was on the Editorial Board for Studies in Avian Biology. She served as an Elective Councilor for the American Ornithologist Union’s and as the Committee Chair for AOU Membership and Early Professional Committees. She is the Chair of the Local Organizing Committee for the 2017 AOU/COS/SCO-SOC meeting in East Lansing, Michigan. Garth Spellman is an Associate Professor of Vertebrate Evolution at Black Hills State University and a Program Director in the Division of Environmental Biology at the National Science Foundation. In August 2015, he will begin a new position as the Curator of Ornithology at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. He received a B.A. in Biology from Carleton College in 1996, a M.Sc. in Zoology from the University of Alaska – Fairbanks in 2000, and a Ph.D. from the University of Nevada Las Vegas in 2006. His focused research efforts use a combination of specimen based fieldwork and genetic and genomic methods to examine how past and current climate change have impacted biological and genetic diversity in North American birds. This research involves collaborative work with undergraduates, graduate students and colleagues, and produced over 25 refereed papers and several technical reports. The National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and South Dakota Department of Fish and Game have funded his research. Garth is also interested in broadening the participation of underrepresented groups in STEM disciplines. He has served as project lead on two National Science Foundation funded initiatives to assist Native American students at Black Hills State University and Oglala Lakota College in the completion of STEM degrees and serves on several broadening participation committees at the National Science Foundation. Garth is a member of several ornithological and evolutionary societies and frequently participates and facilitates society driven broadening participation activities. David Swanson is a Professor of Biology at the University of South Dakota, where he also currently serves as Director of the Missouri River Institute and has also served as department chair. He received a B.S. in Biology from George Fox University and a Ph.D. in Zoology from Oregon State University. His research program is broadly based in the areas of ecological and conservation physiology, the evolution of physiological adaptation in animals, and ornithology. Within these broad areas, his specific research foci include patterns and mechanisms of seasonal phenotypic flexibility in response to changing energy demands (e.g., winter and migration) in birds, and use of natural and anthropogenic woodland and wetland habitats by migrating and breeding birds. His research program is integrative in nature, and includes ecological, organismal, organ/tissue, biochemical and molecular approaches within these research foci. David has authored or co-authored one book and over 80 peer-reviewed articles in a variety of journals, including The Condor, The Auk, Journal of Avian Biology, Journal of Ornithology, Evolution, and Journal of Experimental Biology. His research has been funded by several federal, state and private agencies, including the National Science Foundation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the American Philosophical Society. In addition to his work in the Northern Prairie region, David has conducted field work in Chile and Poland, the former on a Fulbright Teaching and Research Fellowship. David is a member of several professional societies, and has served the Cooper Society in a variety of roles, including Chair of the Painton Award committee, book review editor for The Condor (2004-2011), and reviewing editor for The Condor (2008-2013), and he currently serves as an Associate Editor for The Condor: Ornithological Applications. He has also been involved in efforts to increase participation of underrepresented groups in science, including efforts to engage Native American students in ornithological research. Morgan Tingley is an Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. He received his B.A. in Environmental Science and Public Policy from Harvard University in 2003, an M.Sc. in Zoology from Oxford University in 2004, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2011. He completed post-docs with the Institute for Bird Populations and Princeton University, during which he was awarded a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship. Since 2002, his published work has centered at the intersection of bird distributions and community dynamics with global change ecology. His work primarily is focused on bird communities along temperate elevational gradients, particularly the Appalachians and the Sierra Nevada of California, and how these communities are impacted by climate change, invasive species, habitat conversion, and fire. He has co-authored 19 refereed papers in a range of journals, including The Condor, Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, and Global Change Biology. In 2012, he was awarded the Young Professional Award by the Cooper Ornithological Society, and in 2014 – with the Institute for Bird Populations – he was awarded a “Wings Across America” conservation award from the USDA Forest Service. He currently serves on the Editorial Board of Studies in Avian Biology, is a Subject Editor for Ecography, and actively reviews for over 25 ornithological, conservation, and ecological journals, including Auk, Condor, Wilson Journal of Ornithology, and Journal of Field Ornithology. Passionate about engaging new generations of ornithologists, Morgan served on the Communications Committee of the prospective Society for Ornithology from 2011 to 2012, and more recently has helped develop the website . Blair Wolf is a professor of biology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. He has been a life member of the Cooper Society since 1990 and has served on the board of directors for a single term from 2002-2005, when he also served as chair of the publications committee. Blair was the driving force in the creation of SORA, which now encompasses more than a dozen journal titles and provides free access to ornithological literature to both scientists and amateur ornithologists worldwide. Blair’s research focuses on the physiological ecology and natural history of birds and other vertebrates with a particular interest in the effects of global warming on desert bird communities. He is very interested in student training and has trained a number of undergraduate, masters and PhD students. As a member of the board of directors, Blair would work with the ornithological community and Cooper society to bring more young people into ornithology by encouraging membership, meeting attendance and grants programs for students, engagement in social media, and he would also encourage greater society engagement in conservation issues. He would also work towards expanding the impact and size of the publications of the Cooper Society to broaden access.
  11. The American Ornithologists' Union and Cooper Ornithological Society will meet jointly at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
  12. A new meeting has been added to the =1']Ornithology Meetings database. Meeting Description: The American Ornithologists' Union and Cooper Ornithological Society will meet jointly at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK Meeting Website: http://aoucos2015.ou.edu Click here to view the meeting
  13. This award supports beginning research efforts of Ph.D. graduate students in their first or second year of enrollment. One award of $2500 awards will be designated, in the memory of Joseph Grinnell, to support basic research in any aspect of avian biology. Projects that deal with conservation issues in avian biology should be directed to the Mewaldt-King Research Awards Committee of the Cooper Ornithological Society. Students may not submit a proposal to both award committees in the same year.

 Eligibility

This award is open to all graduate students that are members of the COS and originally enrolled in a Doctoral program AFTER August 2011.

 2014 Proposal Deadline 

Proposals must be submitted electronically on or before 4 JANUARY 2014. Students lacking internet access may submit printed copies of their materials via mail (postmarked by 1 January 2014; see mailing address below) and should include a self-addressed envelope to facilitate notification of the committee's decision. Electronic copies submitted on floppy disks via postal service will NOT be accepted.

 Proposal submission 

To apply for the award, the student should submit one copy of: 1. A short research proposal (no longer than 1800 words; see format below), 2. His/her most current curriculum vitae, and 3. A letter of support from his/her major faculty advisor. It is encouraged that materials be submitted as attachments via email directly to the chair of the committee Scott H. Stoleson Research Wildlife Biologist U.S.F.S. Northern Research Station PO Box 267, Irvine, PA 16329 sstoleson@fs.fed.us 814-563-1040
  14. 2013 COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL SOCIETY BOARD OF DIRECTORS NOMINATIONS The following 6 people (in alphabetical order) have agreed to be nominated for the Cooper Ornithological Society (COS) Board of Directors to serve from 2013 to 2016. An electronic ballot is being prepared and the election will be announced in the near future. Alice Boyle is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Biology at Kansas State University. Alice received her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Arizona and completed post-doctoral research at the University of Western Ontario and the University of British Columbia. Much of her work has investigated the evolutionary ecology of migration including detailed studies of a tropical altitudinal partially migrant bird. Recent and current work includes studies of life history along elevational gradients, physiological ecology of breeding Tree Swallows, links between climate and dispersal behavior in grassland birds, and consequences of wind development for migrant birds and bats in the Great Plains. In 2011 she was awarded the Ned K. Johnson Young Investigator Award from the American Ornithologists’ Union. She has been active at ornithological meetings since 2002, and has served as a student presentation award judge. Additionally, Alice chaired the media committee and helped organize social events at the 2012 NAOC in Vancouver. As a member of the Board of Directors, Alice will strive to ensure that the COS meets the needs of the next generation of ornithologists while honoring the society's heritage. She is keen to strengthen support for young investigators through research and presentation awards, increasing involvement by early-career scientists in the society, and working to ensure students remain engaged with COS following completion of their studies. Matt Carling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Zoology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming and is also the Curator of Vertebrates of the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates. Matt received his BSc from the University of Michigan and his MS from the University of Idaho. Following his PhD at Louisiana State University, he did a postdoc at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Broadly speaking, his research explores questions related to adaptation and speciation in birds. This work often utilizes hybrid zones to study patterns of gene flow and introgression between bird species and how landscape level environmental heterogeneity influences these genetic patterns. He has published papers in the Condor and the Auk, as well as in Evolution, Molecular Ecology, Genetics and other multidisciplinary journals. In 2011, he was honored with the Young Investigator Award from the Cooper Ornithological Society. Matt has been on the AOU Collections Committee since 2008 and has assisted with both the Student Travel Awards and Student Presentation Awards Committees for most AOU/COS meetings over the past 5 years. He is also currently on the Scientific Program Committee for the upcoming 2014 AOU/COS meeting to be held in Estes Park, CO. Matt is eager to be involved with the COS during these transitional times. He recognizes the importance of and need to continue to recruit young professionals to become or remain active in the COS. Further, Matt is enthusiastic to work toward expanding research and travel support for students and other young investigators. Kevin McGraw is an Associate Professor of Evolutionary and Systems Biology in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University. Kevin received his M.Sc. from Auburn University, his Ph.D. from Cornell University, and did his post-doctoral work at the University of California-Davis. Kevin's research focuses on the control, function, development, and evolution of brilliant colors in birds. He has published over 150 papers in this area and in 2006 co-edited a two volume series on Bird Coloration (Harvard University Press). In 2005, Kevin was awarded the Ned K. Johnson Young Investigator Award by The American Ornithologists' Union and the Outstanding Young Investigator Award by the Animal Behavior Society. Kevin joined COS as a graduate student in 2000 and for the past four years has served as a Reviewing Editor for The Condor and The Auk. He is an Elective Member of the American Ornithologists' Union and has served on the executive committee of the Animal Behavior Society (currently as first Member-at-Large) since 2010. For four years, Kevin served on the AOU Special Committee for Young Investigators and shows special interest in COS initiatives in student engagement, diversity and inclusion, and membership retention. Due to his publication and editor history with The Auk and The Condor, he also has strong interest in the recently approved COS-AOU joint publication venture and new journal formats. Paul Nolan is an Associate Professor of Biology at The Citadel, in Charleston, SC, where he teaches lecture and lab-based courses in Ornithology, Animal Behavior, Vertebrate Natural History, and Introductory Biology. He holds a B.S. in Environmental Resource Management from Penn State, an M.S. in Avian Sciences from UC-Davis, and a Ph.D. in Zoology from Auburn University, where he studied the role of song and plumage as multiple ornaments in the house finch. His postdoctoral projects—at Auburn and at Arizona State—included further work related to the signal content of plumage and skin colors. His current research has three broad foci, in sexual selection, disease ecology, and habitat choice by birds. Next year will hopefully see him on sabbatical, working with colleagues at Oxford to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring the size and health of colonies of king penguins, rockhopper penguins, and gentoo penguins in the South Atlantic and on the Antarctic peninsula. He has co-authored papers in The Condor, Journal of Ornithology, Journal of Field Ornithology, Wilson Bulletin, The Ibis, Journal of Avian Diseases, as well as Science, Evolution, Behavioral Ecology, and the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London and 11 other journals. He has also served as a reviewer for 20 journals, the NSF, and the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation. Past service to the COS includes 2 years reviewing proposals submitted to the Mewaldt-King student research award committee; he later Chaired the Mewaldt-King committee for three years, evaluating all 125+ proposals submitted during that period. Paul is currently finishing his 4th year as President of the 1100-member Charleston Natural History Society (CNHS), where he has worked successfully to reform the group’s cash flow, build an extensive digital presence by establishing the group’s blog, facebook and twitter pages, and transitioning the popular newsletter into an interactive and colorful digital format. Other accomplishments with CNHS include leading the renovation of the group’s 149-hectare nature preserve as a field station for graduate research and as an educational site for K-12 students. CNHS is now also a sponsor of the Grice Marine Lab’s graduate student research colloquium as a result of his leadership. If elected to the COS Board of Directors, he hopes to tackle the ongoing problem of declining membership faced by most scientific societies, while also examining the possibility of augmenting the group’s variety of income sources, to help us meet the COS mission to study, support, and conserve bird populations through robust, high-impact research. John T. Rotenberry is Emeritus Professor of Biology at the University of California, Riverside (UCR), where he also served as Campus Director of the UCR Natural Reserve System and was Associate Director of the UCR Center for Conservation Biology. He presently works in the College of Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota, developing a network of biological field stations for the College. He has worked on the ecology and population biology of birds in arid shrublands and grasslands for nearly 40 years, with particular emphasis on habitat and diet selection, reproductive biology, and community ecology. More recently his research has expanded to encompass the conservation biology of vertebrates, especially from a landscape ecological perspective. He has authored or co-authored over 100 refereed papers, and presented or co-authored over 200 papers at professional meetings and at other universities. He has been an active member of ornithological and ecological societies, including service on the Board of Editors for Ecology and as Editor of Studies in Avian Biology, the latter for over 10 years. He is an Honorary Member of the Cooper Ornithological Society, and has also served as the Society’s president. He is a Fellow of the American Ornithologists’ Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Service to the ornithological community has included work for PRBO Conservation Science, Science Advisory Committee of Audubon California, California Natural Community Conservation Planning Program, and the Sonoran Joint Venture. John welcomes the opportunity to continue his decades-long commitment to advancing the interests of COS during a period of challenges to and dynamic change in the structure of ornithological societies. Philip Stouffer is a Professor in the School of Renewable Natural Resources at Louisiana State University. He received a BS in Biology from Bucknell University in 1983 and a PhD in Ecology from Rutgers University in 1989. He held a postdoctoral position at the Smithsonian, where he began his long-term involvement at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project in Amazonian Brazil. His research involves field-based studies of ecology and conservation of birds. These include landscape, community, and population level questions in a variety of systems, including Neotropical rainforests, longleaf pine savannahs, bottomland hardwood forests, managed pine forests, and salt marsh. Among his 65 publications are 11 papers in The Condor, as well as work in The Auk, Wilson Journal of Ornithology, Journal of Field Ornithology, Conservation Biology, Ecology, PNAS, Science, and many other journals. He is especially proud of his coauthorship of a cd collection of bird voices from 340 central Amazonian species. He has advised 25 graduate students, and has served on the graduate committees of many more, including 11 students at Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA). Phil joined COS and the other North American ornithological societies as a graduate student. He considers these societies to be his most important professional affiliations, and has served them as Associate Editor (The Auk), Book Review Editor (Journal of Field Ornithology), Student Award Judge (COS), and Scientific Program Chair (NAOC). Phil recognizes that the North American ornithological societies, including COS, face significant challenges that will inevitably lead to changes. He welcomes the chance to serve on the COS Board of Directors as we address these challenges. He is committed to fair consideration of possible changes that could enrich our science, enhance our professional opportunities, and allow us to share our love for birds.
  15. Joseph Grinnell Student Research Award This award supports beginning research efforts of Ph.D. graduate students in their first or second year of enrollment. One award of $2500 awards will be designated, in the memory of Joseph Grinnell, to support basic research in any aspect of avian biology. Projects that deal with conservation issues in avian biology should be directed to the Mewaldt-King Research Awards Committee of the Cooper Ornithological Society. Students may not submit a proposal to both award committees in the same year. View previous years' Joseph Grinnell Award recipients and titles here. Eligibility This award is open to all graduate students that are members of the COS and originally enrolled in a Doctoral program AFTER August 2010. 2013 Proposal Deadline Proposals must be submitted electronically on or before 1 JANUARY 2013. Students lacking internet access may submit printed copies of their materials via mail (postmarked by 1 January 2013; see mailing address below) and should include a self-addressed envelope to facilitate notification of the committee's decision. Electronic copies submitted on floppy disks via postal service will NOT be accepted. Proposal submission To apply for the award, the student should submit one copy of: A short research proposal (no longer than 1800 words; see format below), His/her most current curriculum vitae, and A letter of support from his/her major faculty advisor. It is encouraged that materials be submitted as attachments via email directly to the chair of the committee Scott Stoleson, Ph.D. USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station PO Box 267 Irvine, PA 16329 Email: sstoleson@fs.fed.us Acceptable electronic file formats are Word, rich text format, and pdf files. Files in other formats will not be accepted. Files should be named using the student's last name and first initial (e.g., SmithC_proposal.pdf; SmithC_cv.pdf). Please include "Grinnell Award" in the subject heading of the email. The letter of support should be submitted separately by the applicant's major faculty advisor. The letter should address the qualifications of the applicant and the importance of the research project. This letter must also state the academic semester or quarter in which the applicant first entered the Ph.D. program. Otherwise the application will not be considered. Format Abstract Introduction, including: (a) objectives with specific hypotheses to be tested (b) summary of any work completed to date © relation to present knowledge (d) significance Proposed methods, analyses, and timetable Literature cited. The complete proposal abstract and text, including literature cited, may not be longer than 1800 words (approximately 5 pages, double-spaced).
  16. The AOU and the COS will meet jointly in Chicago, IL, hosted by The Field Museum.
  17. The University of British Columbia, and the city of Vancouver will host the 5th North American Ornithological Conference in beautiful British Columbia, 14 to 18 August 2012. Vancouver, with its magnificent setting on the Pacific Ocean, offers a wealth of marine, coastal and terrestrial biodiversity, scientific resources and entertainment. NAOC-V will be a wonderful opportunity for ornithologists to experience the rich natural and cultural biodiversity of Canada’s west coast and meet with their colleagues from all over North America. The opening reception will be held on the evening of 14 August, 2012.Field trips will be offered before and after the scientific program. The 4 day scientific program (15-18 August) will begin each day with an address by a distinguished NAOC Plenary Speaker and presentation of Society Awards. The remainder of the daily academic program will consist of symposia, contributed papers, poster sessions and scientific and ENGO workshops. Many exhibitors, including commercial publishers, equipment suppliers, artisans, local groups and ENGOs will be present throughout the meeting. Visit the NAOC-V Forum on the Ornithology Exchange for the latest news.
  18. The Cooper Ornithological Society is pleased to announce that eight new volumes of Studies in Avian Biology are now in print or will be published in 2012. The series is currently published as books by the University of California Press, and forthcoming volumes (vol. 38-45) can be purchased in a hard cover edition or as a digital book for an e-book reader or other electronic device. Visit the publisher’s website to learn more about the exciting new volumes in the Studies in Avian Biology series: No. 38. Knick, S.T., and J.W. Connelly, eds. 2011. Greater Sage-Grouse: ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitats, ISBN: 9780520267114. No. 39. Sandercock, B.K., K. Martin, and G. Segelbacher, eds. 2011. Ecology, conservation, and management of grouse, ISBN: 9780520270060. No. 40. Forsman, E.D. and coauthors. 2011. Population demography of Northern Spotted Owls, ISBN: 9780520270084. No. 41. Wells, J.V., editor. 2011. Boreal birds of North America: a hemispheric view of their conservation links and significance, ISBN: 9780520271005. No. 42. Paul, E., ed. 2012. Emerging avian disease, ISBN: 9780520272378. No. 43. Ribic, C.A., F. R. Thompson III, and P.J. Pietz, eds. 2012. Video surveillance of nesting birds, in press. No. 44. Bart, J.R. and V.H. Johnston, eds. 2012. Arctic shorebirds in North America: a decade of monitoring, in press. No. 45. Lepczyk, C.A., and P.S. Warren. 2012. Urban bird ecology and conservation, in press. Earlier volumes are available at the Searchable Ornithological Research Archive (vol. 1-25), and recent volumes can be purchased from Buteo Books (vol. 26-37).
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