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Found 11 results

  1. This milestone publication presents the first thorough and detailed review of the conservation status of European birds. Based on detailed breeding and wintering population data collected in each country, the report provides a review of the population sizes and trends of Species of European Conservation Concern. The major threats to each species are discussed, with the basic measures that are needed to conserve them and their habitats.
  2. New edition of Birds to Watch with c.1,200 species identified as globally threatened using the latest IUCN criteria. For each species, details are given of their distribution, habitat requirements, population numbers and trends.
  3. Approximately 3,600 bird species occur in the 21 countries of mainland Central and South America, of which 290 are listed as threatened. Taking a country-by-country, site-based approach, this book documents the 596 most important areas for the conservation of these threatened birds. Introductory chapters define Key Areas and the distribution of threatened species, describe habitats, threats and conservation, and identify the gaps in our knowledge of Neotropical birds.
  4. The greatest threats to Europe’s birds and biodiversity come from loss and degradation of habitat. This book brings together more than 190 bird and habitat conservation experts from all over Europe, to examine the threats to Europe’s eight major habitat types, and propose policies and actions to protect and restore them. Although the emphasis is on birds, particularly the 40 percent of European species with an unfavourable conservation status, many of the recommendations within this book would help conserve all elements of biodiversity in the wider European environment.
  5. More than a quarter of bird species are concentrated in areas that together make up just one per cent of the earth’s land surface. These restricted range species include almost three-quarters of all threatened birds. BirdLife International has identified 218 Endemic Bird Areas (EBAs), which hold at least two restricted range species, although some support more than 60. EBAs provide a reasonable overlap with the biodiversity hotspots identified by other conservation organisations, and are a focus for conservation action. At the heart of this book are descriptions of all 218 EBAs, including key habitats, major threats and conservation initiatives and a detailed map. Tables list the restricted-range bird species present, with their global status, habitat requirements and distribution. Introductory sections present global and regional overviews. The authors discuss the wider conservation relevance of EBAs, including why birds are good indicators of biodiversity, and how EBAs can be used effectively to influence policy-makers.
  6. At least 63 percent of the world’s raptors migrate. Raptor Watch, compiled from contributions by over 800 observers worldwide, is a guide to 388 hotspots where these birds can be seen in their thousands. A repository of information for the specialist, this book is also a strategy document enabling conservationists working at the local and national level to cooperate globally to protect raptor migration networks.
  7. The publication of European Bird Populations: Estimates and Trends means that, for the first time, all pan-European data on bird populations and their distribution are available in one book. The information provided acts as a supplement to information given in two previous Birdlife International publications: Birds in Europe: Their Conservation Status and The EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds: Their Distribution and Abundance. Full population data is presented on all 515 regularly occurring species in Europe with line illustrations for each species. Information on population trend and range trend data is provided, along with status threat summaries and population size estimates for each species.
  8. In 1994 BirdLife International published the landmark Birds in Europe: their Conservation Status – the first ever review of the conservation status of all regularly occurring European birds. This book rapidly became a cornerstone of BirdLife’s conservation work and is widely used by the European Commission, national governments and NGO’s. Fully updated, Birds in Europe: Population Estimates, Trends and Conservation Status covers the European continent from Greenland in the west to the Urals in the east, and from Svalbard in the north to the Canary Islands in the south, including Balkan and Caucasian countries where political instability made data collection impossible in 1994. Setting a new standard for conservation data, Birds in Europe (1994) was highly praised for the depth and breadth of its research. Monitoring programmes established since then have provided an even higher accuracy and quality of data for Birds in Europe (2004). Full population data is included on all 526 species regularly occurring in Europe. Half a page is devoted to each species, including an illustration, distribution map, population and trends data, status information, and a concise summary of its status across Europe.
  9. Birdlife's Red Data Book - Threatened Birds of Asia identified that one quarter of all bird species in Asia were a conservation concern, 323 species, about 12% were at risk of global extinction. Clearly it is imperative that important bird areas be identified and then prioritised on the basis of scientific evidence. Important Bird Areas in Asia is the first comprehensive inventory of Asia's key sites for birds and biodiversity. Country-by-country, the book details the region's 2,293 Important Bird Areas (IBAs), of these 976, or 43% are lacking any formal protection. This book presents a sound basis for the development of national conservation strategies and protected area programmes, and highlights areas which should be safeguarded through wise policies and land-use planning.
  10. Language: Spanish with English summary The five countries of the Tropical Andes form the most biodiverse regions in the world, with a quarter of the world's bird species in just three percent of the land area. The astonishing range of habitats includes snow-capped mountains, the high Andean Puna, humid Amazon lowland rainforests, dry forest and the isolated, endemic-species-rich tepuis of Venezuala. More than 600 researchers contributed to the book, which took eight years to compile. 455 sites are identified, covering 17 percent of the land area of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuala. A comprehensive introduction covers habitats, protection, threats and other issues. Each site is described in detail, with thumbnail location maps, graphics and data tables . While it serves as an excellent site guide for birders, this is primarily a blueprint for governments and conservationists involved in planning protected area networks. More than half the sites have no protection.
  11. This directory provides a concise summary of the 2345 Important Bird Areas described to date in the Americas. The inventory represents a participative consensus on the most important sites for bird and biodiversity conservation in the hemisphere, in what is probably the most comprehensive assessment of its kind to be published. Since the beginning of the IBA program in North America in 1995, sites have now been identified in all 57 countries or territories in the region, totaling more than 3,250,000 km2. This book is the culmination of national IBA identification processes involving thousands of people in the Caribbean, North, Central and South America, and at least 150 governmental and non-governmental organizations. The directory is at once a high level awareness-raising publication; a decision-making tool for national and hemispheric biodiversity management and planning; and a portfolio of funding opportunities for potential donors.
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