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Carla Cicero

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AOU/COS 2015 Travel & Presentation Award Applications

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  1. All proposals from the AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds have been moved to the AOS website and are available here: https://americanornithology.org/nacc/current-prior-proposals/ This includes three current proposal sets: 2020-A, 2020-B, 2020-C We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: https://americanornithology.org/nacc/guidelines-for-submitting-a-proposal
  2. Curators/managers of ornithological collections: Please see the invitation below for a data workshop to be held at the North American Ornithological Conference in Puerto Rico. If you actively manage collection data that are published to VertNet/GBIF/iDigBio, and want to see data standardized to make them more discoverable for research and education, this workshop will be of interest to you. Please fill out the form with your intent to attend, if you have not done so already. Title: Bird Data Harmonization Workshop invitation Date and time: Tuesday, 11 August 2020 Convenors: John Bates, Carla Cicero, Town Peterson Invitees: Bird curators and collections managers Rationale: The natural history museum collections community in ornithology has made major strides in recent decades towards sharing its data resources openly to scientists and interested citizens. As a consequence, 7.69 million bird specimen records are now available and searchable online in DarwinCore format, which is a remarkable achievement. This massive storehouse of bird data is making possible many exciting scientific analyses that are teaching important new lessons about bird diversity and biology. The DarwinCore provides an ISO standard set of fields for aggregating data from diverse institutions and sources. In theory, these data can be integrated seamlessly once structured into DarwinCore fields. However, DarwinCore describes only the nature of each field and what it should contain; it does not control the values entered into those fields. Thus, aggregated data often include diverse, confusing, and near-random content in DarwinCore fields, which detracts from their utility and hinders discoverability. As one example, we recently analyzed the terms served by different natural history museums under the field PreparationType. Instead of a small number of expected terms such as “study skin,” “skeleton,” “pickle,” “wing,” etc., we found over 22,000 distinct terms including the names of people, field preparation numbers, and many other values. Inspections of other DarwinCore fields indicate a similar lack of control in data content. NAOC 2020 plans: This workshop is designed as a meeting of minds among those who work with and manage avian specimen data. We will review the overall situation, and lay out a plan to create standardized “vocabularies” for key data fields. In 2020, we will start by working with three important fields (PreparationType, Sex, and Age) with the goal of creating a standard vocabulary for these fields. Participants will be expected to implement those three vocabularies in their respective collections databases over succeeding months, resulting in a qualitative improvement in the quality and utility of bird specimen data. Once we have a list of the participating collections, we will produce summaries of the data that each is contributing to VertNet, and we will provide summaries of the data “situation” to each curator/collections manager in advance of the meeting, to facilitate productive discussions. Future years will involve more complex data unification/standardization challenges, such as creating a taxonomy field or fields that would offer an interpretation of bird specimen identifications under one or several global-scale authority lists for bird names. The final outcome will be the possibility of creating modern “bird specimen inventories” … updating data from the 1980s… such as an inventory of bird study skins by age and sex for each species, or a single searchable catalog of avian tissue resources. But that is a vision into the future; for 2020, we will work with the relatively simple fields listed above. PLEASE fill out a brief survey regarding your potential participation.
  3. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has posted its comments on the 2019 proposals, and also has posted the first set of proposals for 2020. http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/2019.html http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/2020.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: https://americanornithology.org/nacc/guidelines-for-submitting-a-proposal A new Guidelines for English Bird Names has also been posted: https://americanornithology.org/nacc/guidelines-for-english-bird-names
  4. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted two new sets of proposals (2019-C and 2019-D) on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/2019.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposal_guidelines.html 
  5. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has posted a new set of proposals (2019-B) on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/2019.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposal_guidelines.html 
  6. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has posted a new set of proposals (2018-C) on its website: http://checklist.aou..._proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou...guidelines.html
  7. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has posted a new set of proposals (2018-B) on its website: http://checklist.aou..._proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou...guidelines.html
  8. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted a new set of proposals (2018-A) on its website: http://checklist.aou..._proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou...guidelines.html
  9. Please join us next Tuesday for a webinar on Basic & Advanced Searching in Arctos! Mariel Campbell and John Dunnum (Collection Managers, Museum of Southwestern Biology at UNM), along with Kyndall Hildebrandt (Collection Manager, Museum of the North, UAM) will present a live demo of Arctos with time for questions and discussion at the end. When: October 10th at 3pm Eastern Where: https://idigbio.adobeconnect.com/room Learn more about Arctos: https://arctosdb.org Arctos data portal: http://arctos.database.museum Get in touch: arctos-working-group@googlegroups.com Can’t make it next week? Check out our upcoming monthly webinars and recordings of past webinars at https://arctosdb.org/learn/webinars Webinar series brought to you by the Arctos Working Group and kindly hosted by iDigBio. For more on our Adobe Connect webinar platform, please see https://www.idigbio.org/wiki/index.php/Web_Conferencing.
  10. The 58th supplement to the Checklist of North & Middle American Birds is now published and available online through open access: http://www.americanornithologypubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1642/AUK-17-72.1 Votes and comments by the AOS Checklist Committee are also available online: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html All changes have been updated in the online list of species: http://checklist.aou.org/taxa
  11. The AOS Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted a new set of proposals (2017-C) on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposal_guidelines.html
  12. Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration Instructors: Adrienne Leppold and David Brinker Dates: Aug 21 - 27, 2016 Location: Eagle Hill Institute, Steuben, Maine Maine is a nexus of activity for both breeding birds and migrant individuals. This course has been scheduled to overlap the transition period from the breeding season into fall migration. The main topics of the course include 1) methods for capturing and marking wild birds, 2) methods for studying migratory behavior, and 3) data capture, analysis and application. Days will primarily be spent in the field; however some sessions will be reserved for labs dealing with age and sex determination as well as statistical challenges and approaches, particularly with the large amount of easily amassed banding data. Field and classroom topics include, but are not limited to, mist-netting (passive and target with play-back), banding, in-hand species, age, and sex determination, use of auxiliary markers, and various emerging tracking technologies. For more information, go to eaglehill.us/seminars where titles are hot-linked to course descriptions and instructor biographies. This page also includes links to other pages: application information and costs, etc. For more information, contact Marilyn Mayer (Science Program Manager): marilyn@eaglehill.us or 207-546-2821 x1.
  13. Interested in taking the 'work' out of field work? Wildnote is a technical innovation for mobile field data collection that is specifically geared to environmental sciences. They are interested in beta testers, so check it out at http://wildnoteapp.com.
  14. The AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has posted votes and comments on the 2016 set of proposals on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html The new 57th supplement is linked here: http://americanornithology.org/content/aou-checklist-north-and-middle-american-birds-7th-edition-and-supplements The committee is in the process of updating the online checklist.
  15. The AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted a new set of proposals (2016-C) on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposal_guidelines.html
  16. The AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted a new set of proposals (2016-B) on its website: http://checklist.aou..._proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou...guidelines.html
  17. Elizabeth Pratt, trained and specialized in scientific illustration, is looking for new prospects for her illustration work and also wants to expand the diversity of her illustrations. Aside from her training in scientific and technical illustration, she has been vice president for a local nature and science illustrators organization, and has worked extensively from the collection at the Royal Ontario Museum in Canada. She has previously provided illustrations for publishers such as McGraw Hill, and has been featured in journals for organizations such as the Society of Canadian Ornithologists. Elizabeth is located in Ontario, Canada. Her website is: https://elizabethepratt.carbonmade.com Please contact her if you are looking for a scientific illustrator.
  18. Graduate Student Leaders Sought to Shape Science Policy Are you a science graduate student looking to make a difference in science policy and funding? Applications are being accepted for the 2016 AIBS Emerging Public Policy Leadership Award. This award recognizes graduate students in the biological sciences who have demonstrated initiative and leadership in science policy. Recipients receive first-hand experience at the interface of science and public policy. Winners receive: A trip to Washington, DC, to participate in the Biological and Ecological Sciences Coalition Congressional Visits Day, an annual event that brings scientists to the nation's capital to advocate for federal investment in the biological sciences, with a primary focus on the National Science Foundation. The event will be held in spring 2016. Domestic travel and hotel expenses will be paid for the winners. Policy and communications training, including information on the legislative process and trends in federal science funding. Meetings with congressional policymakers to discuss the importance of federal investments in the biological sciences. A one-year AIBS membership, including a subscription to the journalBioScience and a copy of "Communicating Science: A Primer for Working with the Media." The 2016 award is open to U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents enrolled in a graduate degree program in the biological sciences, science education, or a closely allied field. Applicants should have a demonstrated interest in and commitment to science policy and/or science education policy. Prior EPPLA winners and AIBS science policy interns/fellows are not eligible. Applications are due by 11:59 PM Eastern Time on Sunday, 10 January 2016. The application can be downloaded at http://www.aibs.org/public-policy/eppla.html.
  19. Are you working on a bird research project but need more funding? Start a crowdfunding campaign on Instrumentl and participate in the Instrumentl Bird Challenge. Register by entering your name and email by Friday, September 18th at 11:59pm PST. By signing up, you will be eligible to win $500 toward your crowdfunding campaign. Have questions? Read more about the Instrumentl Grant Challenges or send an email at Team@instrumentl.com.
  20. The AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has posted votes and comments on the 2015 set of proposals on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html
  21. The AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted a new set of proposals (2015-C) on its website: http://checklist.aou..._proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou...guidelines.html
  22. The Golden Gate Raptor Observatory (GGRO) is looking for 6 interns to help monitor the autumn migration of thousands of birds of prey over the Marin Headlands. Dates are July 6 to December 31, 2015 (possibly later). See attached flier for details and how to apply. Applications due by March 1st. GGROinternFlyer2015.pdf
  23. The AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has just posted a new set of proposals (2015-B) on its website: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html We encourage submission of proposals to the committee by non-members. Submissions should follow these guidelines: http://checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposal_guidelines.html Please note that the path for committee pages has changed.
  24. The AOU International Grants Program Committee invites proposals from graduate and undergraduate students enrolled in Latin American institutions to conduct benchmark surveys of bird communities in Latin America. Benchmark surveys have the purpose of establishing baseline information on the richness and abundance of birds in Neotropical locations during this dynamic time in history. As climate and land-use patterns change, our understanding of how Neotropical birds respond to such changes will be facilitated by establishment of a network of well-studied reference sites. Site selection should be justified by referencing to existing literature that highlights risks posed to habitats from climate, land-use, or other changes. Sites can be those that are under-represented in the literature, that provide opportunities to address additional ecological questions such as linking bird community data with plant community data (e.g., surveying birds on established tree community survey plots), or that represent widespread yet poorly studied habitats. Survey methodology should be clearly described and should include modern methods that allow the observer to account for the challenges of variability in detection probabilities and should evaluate quantitatively the degree to which the bird community has been thoroughly surveyed. For recommendations on the format of proposals, please see: (put web link here). Funding will support travel costs and basic supplies. Support for stipends is not allowed. The committee anticipates funding 1 to 3 proposals. Budgets of less than $2,000 will be most competitive. To apply, send (as a single PDF) the following items: a one-page cover letter summarizing your qualifications to conduct bird surveys by sight and sound in Latin America; a 2-page proposal following the guidelines outlined at the web link; a C.V.; and names and email addresses of 3 professional references, at least one of whom can address your experience identifying birds by sight and sound in the region you propose to work. Proposals may be written in English, Spanish or Portuguese. Please see application instructions for complete details. The PDF should be sent by email to: aouinternational@gmail.com. Applications must be received by 1 April 2015. Awards will be announced after 1 May 2015.
  25. The American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) and Cooper Ornithological Society (COS) are very excited to announce the launch of a new joint website, http://americanornithology.org. This site is the product of a joint communications effort between the societies, and offers rich information geared toward students, professional ornithologists in various stages of their careers, and anyone interested in birds. The site also features beautiful photographs of birds contributed by numerous photographers. Follow American Ornithology on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmOrnith You can also follow the individual societies through their own Facebook and Twitter accounts: AOU: https://www.facebook.com/groups/59456510623/ http://www.twitter.com/aukjournal COS: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cooper-Ornithological-Society/555824101184387 https://twitter.com/CondorJournal Questions or feedback? Send an email to info@americanornithology.org
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