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  1. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. Aurelia Skipwith, currently the the deputy assistant secretary for fish, wildlife and parks at the Department of the Interior, has been re-nominated to head the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The position has not had a permanent director since the end of the Obama administration. Until August 2018, Greg Sheehan held the post in an acting capacity. Ms. Skipwith was first nominated in 2018 but the 115th Congress did not act on her nomination. In the interim, Meg Everson has been the acting director. Ms. Skipwith is a biologist and lawyer who spent more than six years at the agriculture giant Monsanto. She joined the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2013. However, she seems not to meet the statutory requirement for this position, which, under 16 U.S.C. 742(b) mandates that: No individual may be appointed as the Director unless he is, by reason of scientific education and experience, knowledgeable in the principles of fisheries and wildlife management.Although Ms. Skipwith has a master's degree, it is in animal science (Purdue University, 2005). The areas of specialization offered in that program are: Animal Behavior and Welfare, Cellular and Molecular Biology, Genetics, Management, Meat Science and Food Safety, Neuroscience, Nutrition, and Physiology. In addition, Ph.D. programs are offered in the area of Interdisciplinary Genetics (IGNT). After earning a law degree, she spent four months as an intern in a USDA foreign agriculture program focusing on crops, then seven months as an intellectual property consultant for USAID, focusing on food security. She next spent slightly over a year as assistant general counsel and regulatory affairs coordinator for a company that makes animal food. She began her career at Monsanto and worked her way up from a lab technician to sustainable agriculture partnership manager.
  2. UPDATE JULY 15: The court asked the parties to consider having the three cases consolidated and "The parties in all three actions have conferred, and all parties consent to the consolidation of the three cases, with two caveats. First, the Audubon Plaintiffs consent to consolidation with the understanding that it would not prejudice their ability to litigate the NEPA and notice and comment claims asserted in their complaint but not in the NRDC Action or the States’ Action. Second, plaintiffs in each of the three cases request that they be permitted to continue to file separate briefs if there is further motion practice in the consolidated proceeding. Defendants do not object to the plaintiffs’ requests."
  3. Undergraduate Internship in the Kirtlandia Research Internship Program The Cleveland Museum of Natural History (CMNH), founded in 1920, is located in the heart of University Circle, five miles east of downtown Cleveland, Ohio. Considered one of the finest institutions of its kind in North America, the Museum offers an incredible visitor experience, attracting roughly 275,000 visitors a year. There are more than 140 public education programs and over 80,000 students served annually. The Museum employs about 160 people. Building on its strong foundation of excellence in education and research, the Museum is poised to transform itself. The Museum will invite and engage a broader audience in the exploration of science and the natural world by revolutionizing the way it presents natural history. The Museum has launched a capital campaign to support a dramatic renovation and expansion of its facilities and exhibits. This ambitious plan will position the Museum to play a leading role in regional and national efforts to improve science education and increase scientific literacy. The Museum is seeking a dynamic, creative, organized and energetic individual who is passionate about research in ornithology. The Museum is one of several organizations carrying out the Lights Out Cleveland program, monitoring bird-building collisions during spring and fall migration. Bird casualties come to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History where they are made into research specimens. The ultimate goal of Lights Out Cleveland is to make Cleveland a bird safe city. A sixteen week internship is available for September to December 2019, thanks to funding from the Kirtlandia Society's Research Internship Program and a Conservation Grant from Columbus Audubon Society. Summary Under the general supervision of the Curator and the Collections Manager of the Ornithology Department, the Kirtlandia Research Intern will prepare specimens salvaged during the Lights Out Cleveland migration surveys, and will carry out research using these specimens. Essential Duties and Responsibilities Preparing Specimens Responsible for preparing specimens, primarily as skeletons with spread wings and tissue samples. Initial training will be provided, and the intern will be expected to work fairly independently after the first few weeks. Responsible for generating new labels for the specimens. Conducting Research Responsible for working with the Curator and the Collection Manager to generate scientific questions that can be answered using Lights Out Cleveland specimens. The intern will collect data and analyze it, and collaborate with Ornithology to staff to write a scientific report on the outcome of their research. Education and/or Experience Applicants must either be currently enrolled in an undergraduate program or recently graduated with a BS or BA degree (graduation date must be in 2019). Other Qualifications Ability to multi-task and efficiently prioritize assignments while working independently. Data quality is of the utmost importance, and the intern is expected to have strong attention to detail, to be thorough in data collection, and to write labels with legible handwriting. Professional demeanor, tact, diplomacy, discretion, good judgment, strong insight and instinct, maturity and sophistication. Intermediate knowledge and ability working with computers and computer systems. Familiarity with bird identification in North America is preferred but not required. Previous experience with museum specimen preparation and conducting original research is preferred but not required. Click here to apply The Cleveland Museum of Natural History is an EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, ADA EMPLOYER and a SUBSTANCE-FREE WORKPLACE
  4. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. After being introduced in several successive Congresses without success, legislation introduced by Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) in the 116th (current) Congress to protect albatrosses and petrels has gained traction. The House Committee Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife held a hearing on H.R. 1305 in March and the full House Natural Resources Committee approved the bill on 19 June 2019. It now moves to the full House for a vote. If enacted, this legislation would allow the Secretary of Commerce to undertake a range of activities to protect these species throughout the U.S. territorial waters (12 nautical miles from shore) and the U.S. exclusive economic zone (200 nautical miles from the territorial waters). The legislation also gives the Secretary of Commerce authority under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the other statutes; it also addresses fisheries bycatch and protection of marine habitat under the Magnuson-Stevens Act. It would also prohibit deliberate take unless a permit is obtained. Unfortunately, there is no analogous bill in the Senate and it is unlikely that the Republican-led Senate would consider such legislation.
  5. The House Natural Resources Committee subcommittee on Waters, Oceans, and Wildlife will hold a hearing on this discussion draft on Thursday, 13 June 2019. The witnesses will be: Mr. Paul Schmidt Consulting for Conservation Retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Palmyra, VA Dr. Amanda D. Rodewald Garvin Professor; Senior Director of Conservation Science Cornell Lab of Ornithology Ithaca, NY Mr. Stan Senner Vice President for Bird Conservation National Audubon Society Washington, DC Mr. Alexander K. Obrecht Energy & Regulatory Attorney BakerHostetler Denver, CO
  6. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. Congressman Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) has circulated a discussion draft of legislation that would "amend the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to affirm that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act’s prohibition on the unauthorized take or killing of migratory birds includes incidental take by covered commercial activities, and to direct the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to make a rule establishing a permitting program authorizing and regulating such incidental take, and for other purposes." The discussion draft provides that ‘covered commercial activity’ and ‘covered commercial activities’ mean an industry or type of commercial activity that the Secretary determines cause significant harm to migratory birds including: oil, gas, and wastewater disposal pits; methane or other gas burner pipes; ‘communication towers; electric transmission and distribution lines; and wind and solar power generation facilities. It would authorize a permitting program that would limit the amount of authorized take and require the use of best practices or technologies that are deemed practical and effective. It would also require mitigation measures, including mitigation fees. Even if this bill is eventually introduced and even if it is passed by the House, it has little chance of getting through the Senate, given that the Senate majority leader is blocking virtually all legislation coming from the House or Senate legislation proposed by Democrats. LowenthalDiscussionDraft2019.pdf
  7. The Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture at Mississippi State University (MSU), is seeking applications for a full time, 9-month tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant/Associate Professor rank. This person will be involved in research, teaching, and service. LOCATION: This position is on the MSU campus, located in Starkville, Mississippi. A description of the College of Forest Resources (CFR), the Forest and Wildlife Research Center (FWRC), Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station (MAFES) and the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture can be found at http://www.cfr.msstate.edu/wildlife. STARTING: Fall 2019 or as negotiated RESPONSIBILITIES: The Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture (WFA) seeks a dynamic scholar specializing in wildlife-habitat relationships that yield management applications for public and private stakeholders. Some potential fields of interest include, but are not limited to, species-habitat associations, habitat management and restoration, fire ecology, disturbance ecology, forest ecology, and management of working landscapes. In addition to these areas of interest, we encourage applicants to identify opportunities to build on existing departmental expertise and/or expand the department in new directions. The applicant should be a broadly trained wildlife ecologist that can contribute to a diverse faculty group and demonstrate how their research and teaching program will complement and enrich the department. The primary responsibilities of this position will be the development of a productive, externally-funded, and nationally/internationally recognized research program, effective mentoring of graduate and undergraduate students, and teaching within the WFA program. Teaching responsibilities may include 2-3 undergraduate/graduate courses per year consistent with the candidate expertise and departmental need. The position will be a 50% teaching and 50% research appointment. Mississippi State University is ranked as one of the top research institutions in the United States. The Carnegie Institute has designated MSU as a "higher research activity" doctoral granting institution. We are also ranked among the nation's top 100 research institutions based on the most recent National Science Foundation survey. The 35-member faculty within the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture leads one of the most productive research programs in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University. The department is well-known for its highly collegial and interdisciplinary faculty, post-doctoral fellows, research and extension associates that help make the department one of the premier institutions for applied wildlife and fisheries science in the nation. As one of the fastest growing undergraduate programs in the region, our 300 undergraduate students concentrate in wildlife agriculture science, human-wildlife interactions, conservation biology, wildlife veterinary medicine, conservation law enforcement, and wildlife, fisheries and aquaculture science. The department also houses 60 graduate students across a variety of programs, with nearly 100% job placement rate following receipt of a graduate degree. Located in Starkville, MS, Mississippi State is the centerpiece of a growing college town with a vibrant and diverse community and economy, a low cost-of-living, main street family atmosphere and connections to over a hundred thousand acres of national forests, national wildlife refuges, and state recreational lands. For more information on the Starkville community visit: https://www.starkville.org/ QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. with expertise in wildlife ecology and/or related discipline. Excellence in communication and organizational skills, peer-reviewed publications, and a commitment to service are expected. The candidate should show the ability to collaborate with diverse scientific disciplines, various stakeholder groups, and federal and state natural resource agencies to support long-term partnerships. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Preferred characteristics include postdoctoral or agency research experience, procurement of extramural funds to accomplish research, mentoring of graduate students, strong quantitative skills and teaching experience. Preference will be given to candidates whose research focuses on wildlife habitat management and naturally crosses disciplinary lines. APPLY: Applications must be submitted online http://explore.msujobs.msstate.edu/cw/en-us/job/498650/assistant-or-associate-professor and should include: 1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) statement of research philosophy, 4) statement of teaching philosophy, 5) official transcripts, and 6) programmatic vision statement how your research program will build on existing departmental expertise or expand the department in new directions. Letters of recommendation will be requested internally. Please send contact information for three references to: Angela Hill Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture Mississippi State University angela.c.hill@msstate.edu For additional information on the position announcement, contact search chair Dr. Kristine Evans (662-325-3167) or email at kristine.evans@msstate.edu Mississippi State University is an AA/EEO employer MSU is an equal opportunity employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, ethnicity, sex (including pregnancy and gender identity), national origin, disability status, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We always welcome nominations and applications from women, members of any minority group, and others who share our passion for building a diverse community that reflects the diversity in our student population.
  8. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. In order to better serve the trade community, the USFWS Office of Law Enforcement has created a new CITES permit issuing office in the Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas). For shipments that require a CITES permit (3-200-26, 3-200-28, 3-200-52, 3-200-66, 3-200-73) and are being exported from ports located within the Southwest Region, you may send the permit applications to: Houston - Designated 19241 David Memorial Drive, Suite 175 Shenandoah, Texas 77385 Phone: (281) 230-7225 Fax: (281) 230-7227
  9. Registration has opened! Early registration ends August 31. Abstract submission has opened!
  10. The two complaints are attached to the original post. The M-Opinion to which they are objecting is linked in that same post. What other literature are you looking for?
  11. Melinda - no, I checked just yesterday. Still no hearing scheduled or decision issued.
  12. http://www.cvent.com/events/2019-afo-wos-joint-meeting/location-fc644f2542184eba9fe3b1d37928e0fd.aspx And the plenary speakers have been announced: Robert Curry Dr. Curry is a native of Massachusetts with additional family roots in Nova Scotia. He completed his undergraduate education at Dartmouth College (1979) under the mentorship of Dick Holmes, followed by doctoral study at the University of Michigan (1987) focusing on social and conservation ecology of Galápagos mockingbirds supervised by Peter Grant. He conducted postdoctoral work on Florida Scrub-Jays with Glen Woolfenden and John Fitzpatrick before joining the faculty at Villanova University (1991). Dr. Curry has mentored research by more than 70 Villanova Masters students and undergraduates; their work has involved mimids and other Neotropical birds; Florida Scrub-Jays; the world's one herbivorous spider; and, especially, Carolina and Black-capped chickadees and their hybrids. He served as President of the Wilson Ornithological Society in 2014-2016 after completing multiple terms as an Officer and member of Council. Dr. Curry and his wife Susie have two children, and they eagerly await the arrival of two granddaughters in 2019. As the Margaret Morse Nice Keynote, Dr. Curry will speak on “Transformation of familiar birds into model organisms: what chickadees can teach us” Much like the Song Sparrows that captivated Margaret Morse Nice, chickadees are charismatic backyard birds that we easily take for granted. Research concerning several North American chickadee species has, burgeoned in recent decades, yielding insights about fundamental problems in ornithology-approaching what we have learned from their European relatives. The role of vocal behavior in chickadee mating systems has been examined thoroughly. "Our" chickadees are currently central among studies of social networks using technological tools that allow us to track movements and associations in space and time. Chickadees have contributed important insights concerning cognitive ecology and neuroethology. Long-term research within the northward-moving hybrid zone between Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees combines many of these elements, while also employing genomic approaches and Citizen Science data; this work has revealed influences of ongoing climate change and behavioral mechanisms on the dynamics of songbird hybridization. There is still much to learn from these familiar birds. Christina Riehl Christie has always been fascinated by a) animal social behaviors, and b) anything having to do with birds. Her main research project is a long-term study of the breeding behavior of the greater ani (a bizarre communally breeding cuckoo) in Panama, but she is interested in many questions involving the evolution and ecology of sociality and reproductive biology.
  13. UPDATE 14 May 2019 (excerpts from the Washington Post 10 May 2019): The Agriculture Department has dropped its demand that staff scientists label peer-reviewed research as “preliminary,” after angry protests followed a Washington Post story disclosing the policy. But the latest guidelines, released on Wednesday, for internally reviewing science within the department raise additional questions about scientific integrity, said non-USDA researchers who inspected the guide....This week, acting USDA chief scientist Chavonda Jacobs-Young released a memo that replaced the July policy. It requires the following language when disclaimers are necessary: “The findings and conclusions in this [publication/presentation/blog/report] are those of the author(s) and should not be construed to represent any official USDA or U.S. Government determination or policy.” ...even this language may not be needed: “Many journals have this statement on their mastheads. This expectation, that an article represents the views of the authors only, is indeed the standard.” ...Rebecca Boehm, an economist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a D.C.-based organization that advocates for scientists, said that “removing ‘preliminary’ from the disclaimer is a step in the right direction, but there still may be unnecessary obstacles preventing agency researchers from publishing their work in peer-reviewed journals.” ...Not every study published by a USDA scientist is required to have this disclaimer. Some research agencies at USDA, including the Agricultural Research Service, the Economic Research Service, the National Agricultural Statistics Service and the Forest Service have “agency-specific policies” that determine when a disclaimer is appropriate, said William Trenkle, the USDA scientific integrity officer. ...the department’s internal review process before scientists can publish results in journals. It lists several “flags” that may trigger additional scrutiny. Some flags, under the umbrella of “prominent issues,” include “significant” scientific advancements, the potential to attract media attention, and results that could influence trade or change USDA policy. ... Susan Offutt, who was the administrator of the Economic Research Service under presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, said the guide twists internal review “into a process by which policy officials get the final say on content.” Because researchers at the Economic Research Service publish statistics to aid policymakers, “just about any output” from that agency could be flagged, she said. USDA’s “interests apparently concern consistency with prevailing policy,” Offutt said, “not the public’s access to the best, unbiased science and analysis.” From the Washington Post, 19 April 2019: Researchers at the Agriculture Department laughed in disbelief last summer when they received a memo about a new requirement: Their finalized, peer-reviewed scientific publications must be labeled “preliminary.” The July 2018 memo from Chavonda Jacobs-Young, the acting USDA chief scientist, told researchers their reports published in scientific journals must include a statement that reads: “The findings and conclusions in this preliminary publication have not been formally disseminated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy.” A copy of the memo was obtained by The Washington Post and the USDA confirmed its authenticity. https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/04/19/usda-orders-scientists-say-published-research-is-preliminary/?utm_term=.e08bf8db6cf8 The policy may reflect an attempt to end-run the Information Quality Act, which pertains only to information disseminated by the federal government. That law, created at the behest of corporate anti-regulatory interests, has been a double-edged sword which has also been used by health and environmental groups to challenge the basis of federal agency policies and statements. This newest effort to strangle scientific information produced by scientists employed by federal agencies follows the requirement imposed by the Bush administration that requires scientists (in numerous agencies) to submit their work - including publications and presentations - to agency communications or other leadership offices prior to publication. In addition, the policy bans scientists from including “personal view” statements, language that federal employees have often used to distinguish research articles they author from policy documents issued by the agency. Such a statement might read, in part: “opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own,” as suggested by the National Institutes of Health.
  14. EXPERIENCED BIRD BANDERS IN CHARGE (6), MIST NET ASSISTANTS (6), and AVIAN SURVEYORS (6) needed from 18 August to 6 November (start and end dates mildly flexible) to study the stopover ecology of small passerines along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico (Alabama and Louisiana). BANDERS (minimum experience: 500 eastern songbirds banded and processed) need to have experience with banding large volumes of birds, be familiar with the aging and sexing of eastern species, be able to train and assist assistants in mist net extraction, and independently lead a small team. Also must be able to effectively communicate with project leader\site coordinator in completing tasks associated with the banding operation as well as oversee banding operation including other technicians. MIST NET ASSISTANT (minimum experience: 100 songbirds extracted from mist nets) duties include extracting birds from mist-nets. AVIAN SURVEYOR (minimum experience: ability to identify eastern songbirds by sight and sound) duties include identifying eastern species by sight and sound along a transect, conducting resource surveys, and mist net extraction. Additionally, opportunities may exist for all positions to assist with active research during the field season. All individuals are required to work 7 days a week, carry up to 10 pounds regularly, navigate difficult terrain, assist with data entry, arthropod sampling, fruit/flower counts, and fecal sample analysis, have the ability to work and live well with others in close quarters, have a good sense of humor, and be able to tolerate heat, venomous snakes, biting insects, and wet conditions. In addition to abundant experience, each bander will be compensated a total of $5,000 and each other position will receive $4,000 over the course of the season. Pretty nice housing is provided. In ONE Word document/PDF named in the following format: Lastname-Firstname (e.g. Zenzal-TJ.pdf) please send letter of interest, resume, and names, phone numbers, and email addresses of 3 references to Dr. T.J. Zenzal, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, 1102 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 or by email (preferred): MBRGhiring(AT)gmail.com Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. The University of Southern Mississippi conducts background checks on all job candidates upon acceptance of a contingent offer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or national origin. EOE/F/M/VETS/DISABILITY.
  15. HawkWatch International is hiring an Executive Director to lead the organization. The next leader of this growing organization must have: Enthusiasm for conservation, birds of prey, and the HWI mission Experience with business management for non-profit or NGO with staff of +/- 25 Science Foundation in raptor related biology and conservation, field sciences or academia Proven fund-raising capabilities Appreciation for the HWI mission is essential, as is inspiring others and bringing a high level of energy to the work of development, education and field operations. The successful individual will lead staff and volunteers to grow HWI’s capacity scientifically, educationally, and financially into a nationally and globally recognized conservation organization. The next leader must execute the strategic vision while building upon a team culture of trust and shared core values. Key for the successful candidate is experience leading and growing a similarly sized and focused organization. HWI Staff and Board are keen to continue recent growth and build upon the strong foundation of this 30+ year old organization. Staff and Board desire a leader that understands how to manage an organization, and has the energy to be involved in working towards a shared vision while creating independence by building trust. This individual will ideally have a science background, preferably in raptor biology or closely linked experience in conservation, education, ecology, or ornithology. This role will lead an organization with a focus on raptor-oriented research and education. Experience in these areas is necessary in order to direct the work and successfully network with partners, stakeholders, the greater raptor community and the general public. Long term growth is highly dependent on a leader with proven fund-raising capabilities, strong networking skills and a willingness to reach out to donors. The Executive Director is the spokesperson for the collective team and must be comfortable building relationships at multiple geographic scales. A key success factor will be experience with development strategies and an action-oriented focus to deliver. Opportunities to grow both nationally and internationally are substantial and necessitate a well-cultivated pipeline of major donors. HawkWatch International is poised to dramatically increase its impact, creative approaches, partnerships, and overall reach. We are looking for an Executive Director who can envision the HWI of the future and is able to lead the charge to successfully realizing that vision. Requirements Advanced degree in science, business administration, communications, or relevant field. Knowledge and experience in environmental conservation, ecology, ornithology, and birding. Proven experience as Executive Director or in a similar managerial position. Significant experience in developing successful strategies and plans. Proven success in fundraising and networking. In-depth knowledge of nonprofit management, governance principles, and managerial best practices. Familiarity and comfort with monthly financials and annual audits. Aptitude for analytical thinking, capable of creative solutions to solve problems thoroughly and rapidly. Impeccable organizational skills, leadership abilities and the skill of collaboration. Exceptional oral and written communication abilities and public speaking skills. Ability to work from Salt Lake City, Utah Hours and Compensation Full-time (exempt), salaried staff position. Starting salary of $65,000–$ 75,000 (depending on experience and education), with excellent benefits package, including medical, dental and matching retirement plan. To apply: Send cover letter, CV/resume and contact information (phone #) for 3 references to Paul Parker, Executive Director, by April 19, 2019. Preferred start date: July 1, 2019. We encourage applicants of diverse backgrounds, ethnicities, etc. as we value a diverse and inclusive HawkWatch community. For more information on HawkWatch and our programs, visit www.hawkwatch.org.
  16. Common Loon Project in northern Wisconsin requires 3 outdoor-loving, physically fit volunteers to assist in a 26-year investigation of territory acquisition and defense. Applicants should be available for all or most of period 15 May – 10 August 2019. Interns will visit study lakes via solo canoe to identify loons from colored leg bands, observe and record territorial and breeding behavior, and locate and GPS nests. Late in the season, they will assist in nocturnal capture, marking, and taking of blood and feather samples in adults and chicks. Successful applicants must have a car that gets 30 mpg or better, be able to swim well, have good hearing and vision, have a strong work ethic, be meticulous about taking notes, be able to work with others or alone, and have a love of outdoor conditions. Experience with bird identification, canoes, and motorboats helpful but not essential. Housing and gasoline reimbursement provided. Send resume and list of 3+ references ASAP (but not later than 15 May) via e-mail to: Dr. Walter Piper, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA, 92866 (e-mail: wpiper@chapman.edu). For more info, see web page at: http://www.chapman.edu/~wpiper/
  17. UPDATE 1 APR 2019 The government has now filed its reply brief responding to the plaintiffs' (several states, in one case, and several conservation organizations in the other case) brief opposing the government's motion to dismiss the case. No hearing date has been set; it is possible that the court (the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York) will decide the motions without oral arguments. If the cases survive the government's motion to dismiss, the case will go forward in the U.S. District Court. If not, it would be up to the plaintiffs to file an appeal in the U.S. Circuit Court.
  18. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-47515175 The building may have been insured but the family that lives there and runs the observatory lost everything. If you want to help, there is a gofundme here https://www.gofundme.com/helping-the-parnaby-family-after-bird-obs-fire?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=fb_dn_postdonate_r&fbclid=IwAR0yJcl0i5M7Sysgv3SKXV06cf6f3ONPsm6wWPIsBqEJiOy6Cq_WIgp-CXE
  19. The Waterbird Society is pleased to announce that its 43d annual conference and general meeting will be held at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The university is located in Princess Anne, Maryland. Please mark the dates on your calendar: Registration opens: May 1 Abstract submission opens: May 1 Arrive, Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 6 Paper Sessions, Posters: Thursday, November 7 - Saturday November 9 Special all-day event for the Waterbird Society Diversity Program: Friday, November 8 Closing Banquet: Saturday November. 9 The conference website is under construction so please check back for additional information. In the meantime, if you have not already done so, it would be exceptionally helpful for planning purposes if you would answer a very short, two-question survey to indicate your interest in attending and to gauge the need for various transportation options. Please note that the call for symposia has already been issued: The Waterbird Society is calling for anyone who would like to propose a Symposium or Workshop for this meeting. A symposium may be a full day (~14 presentations) or half day (7 presentations). Likewise, workshops can be a full day, half day, or a couple of hours. Please direct any questions about symposia and workshops to Dave Moore (dave.moore2@canada.ca; proposals due by 01 May, 2019).
  20. UPDATE 11 Feb 2019: The government's brief supporting its motion to dismiss the case was to have been filed by 22 Feb 2019. However, on 3 Jan 2019, the court ordered that the Government's reply in support of its motion to dismiss, however, remains STAYED consistent with the Chief Judge's order, unless funding was restored to the Department of Justice by January11, 2019. If funding is restored by January 11, 2019, then the Government's reply brief remains due on February 22, 2019. Of course, funding was not restored by 11 Jan 2019. The court further ordered that if funding for the Department of Justice was restored after January 11,2019 (which it was) then the Government's reply brief will be due seven weeks after the funding is restored. As funding was restored on on 25 Jan 2019, the government's reply brief would be due on or about 18 March. It remains to be see how a second shutdown would affect this schedule, but presumably, the time for the reply brief would again be stayed and the remaining four weeks would begin to run when the second shutdown ends.
  21. In Memoriam: Tom J. Cade Ph.D. 1928 – 2019 Founding Chairman BOISE, Idaho – On a spring day in 1980, Dr. Tom Cade climbed into a Peregrine Falcon nest box on top of a release tower in Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey. Just a couple of years earlier, Tom’s team of biologists and falconers had bred, raised, and released the falcon pair that now raised their own family on this tower. These two birds were part of a nationwide recovery program for the species. Peregrine Falcon populations had declined drastically in the 1950s and ‘60s due to the widespread use of DDT – a pesticide that interfered with calcium metabolism and caused birds to lay very thin-shelled eggs that would crack during incubation. By 1970, Peregrine Falcons were extinct in the eastern United States and fewer than 40 pairs were estimated to remain in the west. Dr. Cade, an ornithologist and lifelong falconer, was acutely aware of this decline and worked with others across the nation to ban the use of DDT and develop a recovery plan for our nation’s fastest animal. Tom marked one of the proudest moments of his career atop that tower in the spring of 1980. That’s when he discovered three young nestlings—some of the first Peregrine chicks produced in the wild in eastern North America since the 1950s. Looking back on the day, Tom recalled, “I then understood that recovery of the Peregrine would be an accomplished fact in a few more years.” He was right. In August of 1999, Tom stood on stage with then-Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to officially declare that the Peregrine Falcon was recovered in North America and had been removed from the Endangered Species List. To this day, it’s considered among the greatest conservation success stories of all time – Tom would refer to it as an effort of “teamwork and tenacity.” In saving the Peregrine, Tom co-founded a non-profit conservation organization to effectively manage the financial support being offered by the public. Called The Peregrine Fund, this organization grew to become much more than he originally envisioned, and over the past five decades has worked with more than 100 species in 65 countries worldwide. Many species such as the Mauritius Kestrel, Northern Aplomado Falcon, several species of Asian Vultures, California Condor, and more are thriving today because of work The Peregrine Fund and its many partners have undertaken. Dr. Tom Cade passed away today at age 91 years. “The world of wildlife conservation has lost a pioneer and champion today,” said The Peregrine Fund’s President and CEO, Dr. Rick Watson. “Tom fought for Peregrines and practical conservation solutions, and mentored generations of passionate individuals. His reach extended around the globe to inspire raptor research and conservation on virtually every continent and on behalf of hundreds of species.” “While we are devastated by his passing, we are uplifted knowing his legacy lives on in this organization, and among his many students, friends, followers, and supporters. We’re grateful Tom continued to travel, write, practice falconry, and visit with the staff up until his last days. His advice, conviction, and gentle presence will be sorely missed.” “Our thoughts are with Tom’s wife and devoted partner, Renetta, and their children and grandchildren in this time of loss.” Since his first ornithological survey of St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea in 1950, Tom’s passion for natural history and his professional career spanned nearly seventy years. It involved teaching at Syracuse University and Cornell Lab of Ornithology in New York, post-doctoral research on desert birds and raptors in southern Africa, starting the Peregrine breeding program at Cornell University, co-founding and leading The Peregrine Fund, and researching the critically endangered Mauritius Kestrel. The Board and staff of The Peregrine Fund mourn the loss of their co-founder and mentor, one of the world’s most visionary conservationists and widely respected scientists, Professor Tom Cade.
  22. https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/523073100 Summary This position serves as a Staff Biologist in the Branch of Conservation Science Policy, providing technical support on biological issues related to at-risk species; and to provide policy interpretation to a variety of sources, both within and outside the Fish and Wildlife Service on matters relating to the conservation of species subject to international trade. Responsibilities Implements programs to protect and enhance the conservation status of species trade in conjunction with Federal or state agencies or private non-profit conservation organizations. Prepares biological findings which reflect the best available information on the biological status of the species and threats to their survival. Writes assessments of species: status and threats to their conservation that address laws, international treaties, and U.S. regulation requirements. Responds to written inquiries from the public. Ensures public involvement in decisions by preparing and publishing notices in the Federal Register. Responds to inquiries about sensitive issues related to international wildlife trade including correspondence, briefing papers, and technical communications regarding U.S. laws and regulations. Travel Required Occasional travel - You may be expected to travel for this position. Supervisory status No Promotion Potential 12 Requirements Conditions of Employment Must be a U.S. Citizen or National Males born after 12-31-59 must be registered for Selective Service Resume and supporting documents (See How To Apply) Suitability for employment, as determined by background investigation May be required to successfully complete a probationary period Qualifications Only experience and education obtained by 02/15/2019 will be considered. Education Requirement: Basic Requirements for this position: You must meet A or B below to qualify for the position. A. Degree: biological sciences, agriculture, natural resources management, or related discipline appropriate to the position being filled.OR­ B. Combination of education and experience: courses equivalent to a major in biological sciences, agriculture, or natural resources; OR at least 24 semester hours in biological sciences, natural resources, wild land fire management, forestry, or agriculture course work equivalent to a major field of study plus appropriate experience or additional education that is comparable to that normally acquired through the successful completion of a full 4-year course of study in the biological sciences; agriculture, or natural resources. You may qualify at the GS-11 level, if you fulfill one of the following qualification requirements: One year of specialized experience comparable in scope and responsibility to the next lower grade level (equivalent to at least the GS-09) in the Federal government or private sector. Examples of experience may include: evaluate biological findings in manuscripts, proposals, and study plans, articles for publication in scientific literature, and presentations at professional meetings; apply animal and/or plant ecology and biological conservation principles to find solutions to complex conservation issues for species subject to international trade; and monitor species status and wildlife trade data species subject to international trade to prioritize conservation action; OR A Ph.D. or equivalent doctoral degree; or 3 full years of progressively higher level graduate education leading to such a degree; or possession of a LL.M. degree, if related. Graduate level education must demonstrate the competencies necessary to do the work of the position, examples of qualifying fields include biological sciences, agriculture, or natural resources; OR A combination of education and experience as listed above. Experience refers to paid and unpaid experience, including volunteer work done through National Service programs (e.g., Peace Corps, AmeriCorps) and other organizations (e.g., professional; philanthropic; religious; spiritual; community, student, social). Volunteer work helps build critical competencies, knowledge, and skills and can provide valuable training and experience that translates directly to paid employment. You will receive credit for all qualifying experience, including volunteer experience. Education PROOF OF EDUCATION: All applicants who are using education or a combination of education and experience to qualify must submit copies of official or unofficial transcripts which include grades, credit hours earned, major(s), grade point average or class ranking, institution name, and student name. If any required coursework is not easily recognizable on transcripts, or if you believe a portion of a particular course can be credited toward meeting an educational requirement, you must also provide a memorandum on letterhead from the institution's registrar, dean, or other appropriate official stating the percentage of the course that should be considered to meet the requirement and the equivalent number of units. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable; however, if you are selected for the position, you will be required to produce the original official transcripts. PASS/FAIL COURSES: If more than 10 percent of your undergraduate course work (credit hours) were taken on a pass/fail basis, your claim of superior academic achievement must be based upon class standing or membership in an honor society. GRADUATE EDUCATION: One academic year of graduate education is considered to be the number of credits hours your graduate school has determined to represent one academic year of full-time study. Such study may have been performed on a full-time or part-time basis. If you cannot obtain your graduate school's definition of one year of graduate study, 18 semester hours (or 27 quarter hours) should be considered as satisfying the requirement for one year of full-time graduate study. FOREIGN EDUCATION: If you are using education completed in foreign colleges or universities to meet the qualification requirements, you must show the education credentials have been evaluated by a private organization that specializes in interpretation of foreign education. For further information, visit: http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ous/international/usnei/us/edlite-visitus-forrecog.html Additional information Career Transition Assistance Plan (CTAP) or Interagency Career Transition Assistance Plan (ICTAP): These programs apply to employees who have been or may be involuntarily separated (e.g. reduction in force, declining to relocate/transfer outside their local commuting area) from a Federal service position within the competitive service or Federal service employees whose positions have been deemed surplus or no longer needed. To receive selection priority for this position, you must: (1) meet CTAP or ICTAP eligibility criteria; (2) be rated well-qualified; and, (3) submit the appropriate documentation to support your CTAP or ICTAP eligibility (e.g., Certification of Expected Separation, Reduction-In-Force Separation Notice, or Notice of Proposed Removal or Removal Notice; SF-50 that documents the RIF separation action; or Removal and most recent performance appraisal.). For more information visit: https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversight/workforce-restructuring/employee-guide-to-career-transition/ To register or verify your registration go to the Selective Service System at https://www.sss.gov/RegVer/wfRegistration.aspx FWS has determined that the duties of this position are suitable for telework and the selectee may be allowed to telework with supervisor approval. A PCS move is not authorized. If you are unable to apply online or need to fax a document you do not have in electronic form, view the following link for information regarding an Alternate Application: https://help.usastaffing.gov/Apply/index.php?title=Alternate_Application_Information. Read more How You Will Be Evaluated You will be evaluated for this job based on how well you meet the qualifications above. Once the announcement has closed, a review of your resume and supporting documentation will be used to determine whether you meet the basic qualification requirements listed on this announcement. If you meet the basic qualifications your resume and supporting documentation will be compared against your responses to the assessment questionnaire to determine your level of experience. If, after reviewing your resume and/or supporting documentation, a determination is made that you have inflated your qualifications and/or experience which resulted in you being listed in the highest quality category, you may lose consideration, or be assigned to a lower quality category for this position. Please follow all instructions carefully when applying, errors or omissions may affect your eligibility. Your qualifications will be evaluated on the following competencies (knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics): Interpersonal and communication skills sufficient to coordinate projects and provide technical assistance/support. In depth professional knowledge of the Endangered Species Act (which includes CITES), the Wild Bird Conservation Act (WBCA), and other laws, treaties and agreements pertaining to the international trade in wildlife and wildlife products in order to evaluate biological and trade data on select species; to review resolutions and decisions adopted by the parties; and to provide policy recommendations for U.S. delegations to CITES meetings. In depth professional knowledge of the theories, principles, concepts, and methods of wildlife biology and wildlife management; and knowledge of habitat, status, ecology, conservation of wildlife species in order to provide program support and monitoring of biological and trade data on select species, review potential impact of project proposals, and other CITES related assessments. Ability to interpret and support the implementation of conservation policies related to CITES and to provide policy recommendations. All qualified candidates will be assigned to a quality category. The category assignment is a measure of the degree in which your background matches the competencies required for this position. The category ratings for this position are: Best Qualified Well Qualified Qualified The Category Rating Process does not add veterans' preference points or apply the "rule of three" but protects the rights of Veterans by placing them ahead of non-preference eligibles within each quality category. Veterans' preference eligibles who meet the basic qualification requirements and who have a compensable service-connected disability of at least 10 percent will be listed in the highest quality category (except in the case of scientific or professional positions at the GS-09 level or higher). If you are a veteran with preference eligibility and you are claiming 5-point veterans' preference, you must attach a copy of your DD-214 showing you were honorably discharged. If you are claiming 10-point veterans' preference, you must attach an SF-15," Application for 10-Point Veterans' Preference" in addition to the proof required by that form.Read more Background checks and security clearance Security clearance Other Drug test required No Help Required Documents To apply for this position, you must submit a complete Application Package which includes: Resume or Application. At a minimum, your resume MUST contain job title (include job series and grade, if federal), duties, starting and ending dates (month and year), hours worked per week, and salary. USAJOBS has a template to ensure a complete resume. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YX7o1PBoFk Other supporting documents: Cover Letter, optional Official or unofficial College Transcript(s), if the position has education requirements, or if you are using your education to qualify. Education must be accredited by an accrediting institution recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. A copy of your official transcripts will be required if you are selected. If you are using education completed in foreign colleges or universities to meet the qualification requirements, you must show the education credentials have been evaluated by a private organization that specializes in interpretation of foreign education programs and such education has been deemed equivalent to that gained in an accredited U.S. education program; or full credit has been given for the courses at a U.S. accredited college or university. For further information, visit: http://http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ous/international/usnei/us/edlite-visitus-forrecog.html Veterans' Preference documentation, if applicable (e.g., DD-214 Member Copy 4 showing type of discharge/character of service, SF-15 Form and related documentation, VA letter, etc.) If applicable, documentation/proof that you are eligible Career Transition Assistance Program/Interagency Career Transition Assistance Program documentation, if applicable (e.g., Certification of Expected Separation, Reduction-In-Force Separation Notice, or Notice of Proposed Removal; SF-50 that documents the RIF separation action; and most recent performance appraisal.) If you are relying on your education to meet qualification requirements: Education must be accredited by an accrediting institution recognized by the U.S. Department of Education in order for it to be credited towards qualifications. Therefore, provide only the attendance and/or degrees from schools accredited by accrediting institutions recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Failure to provide all of the required information as stated in this vacancy announcement may result in an ineligible rating or may affect the overall rating. How to Apply Review the Appointment Eligibility Criteria: The eligibility section of the application process is designed to allow you to choose how you wish to be considered for this vacancy announcement. You will ONLY be considered for the appointment eligibilities that you selected. You must provide proof of your eligibility as required by appointment eligibility to be considered. Resume or Application. At a minimum, your resume MUST contain job title (include job series and grade, if federal), duties, starting and ending dates (month/day/year), hours worked per week, and salary. USAJOBS has a template to ensure a complete resume. You must also complete the online application and assessment questionnaire and submit the documentation specified in the Required Documents section below. DEADLINE DATE: A complete application package must be received by 11:59 PM (EST) on 02/15/2019 to receive consideration. To begin, click Apply to access the online application. You will need to be logged into your USAJOBS account to apply. If you do not have a USAJOBS account, you will need to create one before beginning the application. Follow the prompts to select your resume and/or other supporting documents to be included with your application package. You will have the opportunity to upload additional documents to include in your application before it is received. Your uploaded documents may take several hours to clear the virus scan process. After acknowledging you have reviewed your application package, complete the Include Personal Information section as you deem appropriate and click to continue with the application process. You will be taken to the online application which you must complete in order to apply for the position. Complete the online application, verify the required documentation is included with your application package, and submit the application. You will be considered for all eligibilities for which you select "yes" and submit the required documents and supporting documentation (e.g. DD 214, Schedule A letter, etc.). The supporting documentation you submit will be used to determine your eligibility. Please review the list of documentation provided in the eligibilities language to ensure you provide the appropriate information. Please note, your eligibility will be based solely on the selections you have indicated "yes" in this section. You must provide the supporting documentation to support your claim to be considered. You may choose more than one eligibilities in this section. To view the assessment questionnaire, click here: https://apply.usastaffing.gov/ViewQuestionnaire/10413339 To verify the status of your application, log into your USAJOBS account (https://my.usajobs.gov/Account/Login), all of your applications will appear on the Welcome screen. The Application Status will appear along with the date your application was last updated. For information on what each Application Status means, visit: https://www.usajobs.gov/Help/how-to/application/status/. Close Agency contact information Ryan Myers Phone (703) 358-1743 Email ryan_myers@fws.gov Address Division of Human Resources Division of Human Resources 5275 Leesburg Pike, MS-BPHC Falls Church, VA 22041 US
  23. Roger B. Clapp, an ornithologist who spent many years in the Division of Birds at the National Museum of Natural History, passed away on 24 December, 2018. A fellow of the AOU, Clapp co-authored the Birds of North American account for the Grey-backed Tern (Onychoprion lunatus). As a undergraduate at Cornell, Clapp studied under Charles Sibley and traveled with classmates as early as his freshman year to collect eggs for Sibley's egg-white protein studies. After graduating, Clapp conducted work with the Smithsonian Institution's Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program, circa 1962-1969, where he banded pelagic birds at sea. Clapp served as a museum specialist in the Curatorial Project of the Biological Survey Unit of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and assisted with the curation and management of the North American Bird Collections.
  24. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. Update 30 Jan 2019 on BIRD BANDING PERMITS: We are advised by the BBL that the backlog of work awaiting them upon return from the shutdown return is daunting. Permit renewals were the #1 priority for the BBL permit office. The BBL staff has completed that task for the permits that expired in December/January and should have the February permits (that we have received) renewed before the end of the week. Any bander with a permit that expires in February or March should request renewal before Feb. 15 in case of a second shutdown. The BBL is turning its attention to the other permit related requests and will plow through that backlog as fast as week can, prioritizing those banding activities that are planned to start within the next month or so. They should be caught up with the band order requests by early next week. Operationally, the banding community should not experience many problems for ongoing operations as a result of the shutdown. They should be caught up before the activities for the 2019 field season crank up in May/June unless they experience another shutdown in mid-February.
  25. https://www.newsweek.com/bird-deaths-collision-nyc-buildings-time-warner-center-new-york-city-debora-1294801?fbclid=IwAR3KtMkGiEj7RRt6PHT3yfzj8S-UXLjq5rHm9bi_LKtXoWgoyTPW7fJpPBg Glick, who represents some bird-collision hot spots in both Lower Manhattan and Greenwich Village, last year introduced a bill that called for every building construction project in New York City to establish “bird collision deterrent safety measures” and use “bird-safe building materials and design features.” Its measures call for premium materials such as ultraviolet treated or fritted glass (the near-invisible porcelain ball patterns that birds can detect) when applied from the ground level to 50 feet high, where most collisions occur. Screens or netting are other makeshift ways to cut down on “one of the largest threats to bird populations in New York City.” Once introduced, Glick’s feather-friendly bill gained sponsors, but failed to pass. On Jan. 9, the unflappable legislator reintroduced the bird-saving bill. On her second try, Glick believes the country’s biggest city will do the right thing and own up to its environmental hazards. The bill still demands that any building that undergoes construction or reconstruction work “shall be designed to comply with bird collision deterrent safety measures.” That includes incorporating glass that is essentially bird-splat proof and approved by the division of migratory bird management in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “We would like to require the city of New York to have bird deterrence and bird-safe glass in all new constructions and major renovated buildings,” she said. State Assembly Member Steve Englebright, who reps Suffolk County on Long Island and chairs the Assembly Committee on Environmental Conservation, last January re-introduced the “bird-friendly building council act." Unlike Glick’s bill, there was no binding ultimatum forcing the city’s building projects to adopt bird-friendly measures. Instead, Englebright’s bill proposed an 11-15 member “Bird-friendly building council” to establish rules and criteria to “reduce or eliminate bird mortality from building collisions. After the council conferred, recommendations would be sent to the governor, the Senate majority leader and the speaker of the assembly “for their consideration of being codified in state law.” Englebright attempted to get the bill passed three previous times without success, an aid confirmed.
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