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Studying birds in the context of the annual cycle: Carry-over effects and seasonal interactions


Chris Merkord

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From Matt Jeffery:

 

Thank you to everyone that could join the presentation last week given by Dr. Pete Marra from the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center - Studying birds in the context of the annual cycle: Carry-over effects and seasonal interactions.

 

As promised, we recorded the presentation for those that were unable to attend and those that would like to see the presentation again. Please use the following links:

 

Streaming recording link:

Download recording link:

 

Studying birds in the context of the annual cycle: Carry-over effects and seasonal interactions.

Peter P. Marra, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C.

Migratory birds spend different parts of the annual cycle in geographically disparate places. The conditions and selective pressures during each period are likely to affect individual performance during subsequent periods. This simple fact presents us with considerable obstacles for understanding how agents of global change (i.e., climate, land-use) will influence the ecology, evolution, and conservation of migratory birds. Such inter-seasonal effects are poorly understood within most avian migration systems, in large part because it has been difficult to follow individuals and specific populations year round (i.e., migratory connectivity). In addition, for most species there exists an extreme research bias towards breeding rather than non-breeding season biology. Furthermore, the limiting factors and regulatory mechanisms that determine abundance remain poorly understood for most bird species. Here, I show using our long-term research on redstarts in Jamaica how events on wintering grounds, such as climate and habitat affect both arrival time and body condition of individual birds on breeding areas, and how these parameters are likely to have important consequences for breeding events and annual survival. Understanding how global change will influence migratory organisms requires the study biological phenomena in the context of the entire annual cycle.

 

Matt Jeffery

Senior Program Manager

International Alliances Program

National Audubon Society

1150 Connecticut Avenue, NW. #600

Washington DC 20036

Tel:
+1 202 600 7965

See what’s happening in with IAP -
IAP.Audubon.org

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