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  1. Today
  2. Description: We are looking for volunteer field assistants for our study of avian behavioral ecology in the Dongzhai National Nature Reserve in China. The volunteers are expected to assist in two projects: (1) black-throated and silver-throated tit project, which will be focusing on interspecific comparison of incubation behavior and respective adaption to climate variation; and 2) Japanese tit project, which will be focusing on how personality traits are associated with reproductive performance in a newly established nest-box population. The volunteers will be working with a crew of 6-10 people, including students, field technician and other volunteers. Duties of both project include identifying color-ring-banded individuals, searching for and checking nests, mist-netting birds, observing behaviors and conducting experiments, etc. The black-throated and silver-throated tit project will start at the beginning of February and end in mid-May, and the Japanese tit project will start at the same time as the former project, but will probably end at the end of June or the beginning of July. The duration of the Japanese tit project will be late February to June 20, 2019. The volunteer can be joining the projects at any time, but those with a minimum stay of two or more months are preferred. The two projects are both conducted at the Dongzhai National Nature Reserve, a well-known birding spot located in the Henan province of central China. Volunteers will have opportunities to learn field skills of ornithological research, see many Chinese bird species, and experience Chinese tradition and culture. The projects will cover all work-related expenses during the volunteering period (i.e. housing, foods, and traffics, etc.), but there is no salary, and the assistants are responsible for their travel to and from China. Qualifications: 1. Strong interest in wildlife research, especially birds and animal behaviors; 2. A background in biology, ecology or a related field. Previous experience with birds is preferred, but not essential (basic training, such as mist-netting and behavioral observation, will be provided). 3. Be physically fit for field work and willing to work for long and irregular time in the field. 4. Be used to Chinese diet and be willing to share rooms with other crew members. Some more information of our projects can be found at: http://www.luckytit.cn To apply: For black-throated and silver-throated tit project, please contact Robyn Geldard at robyngeldard@bjfu.edu.cn; and for Japanese tit project, please contact Jiangnan YIN at "jiangnan_yin@126.com". The application should include (1) a short resume or CV, (2) the dates you will be available for the project and (3) the names and contact information of at least two references. When applying, your kind cooperation to copy your email to luckytit@163.com will be appreciated.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Hi, I am trying to use TwGeos::preprocessLight() to identify twilights in light data collected by Lotek LAT280 tags. The below is the log of the "Light Intensity" variable. This approach doesn't seem to give great definition between the dark and light sections and makes picking a threshold challenging. Does anyone have any suggestions for a transformation, a threshold, or an alternative approach with the data from this tag? Thanks!
  5. Last week
  6. As co-president of BirdLife International's Rare Bird Club, novelist Graeme Gibson worked tirelessly to the champion the cause of birds, both in his native Canada, and globally.View the full article
  7. A study published today in the journal Science reveals that since 1970, bird populations in the United States and Canada have declined by 29 percent, or almost 3 billion birds, signaling a widespread ecological crisis. The results show tremendous losses across diverse groups of birds and habitats—from iconic songsters such as meadowlarks to long-distance migrants such as swallows and backyard birds including sparrows. View the full article
  8. A new study shows that the USA and Canada have lost more than a quarter of their birds over the past 50 years. This massive reduction in abundance involves hundreds of species, from beloved backyard songbirds to long-distance migrants. So what’s going on?View the full article
  9. Here are some of the grants and awards from our funding database with due dates coming up in November and December: ABA Ludlow Griscom Award for Outstanding Contributions in Regional Ornithology (and other ABA awards). Recognition. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/aba-ludlow-griscom-award-for-outstanding-contributions-in-regional-ornithology-r226/ Bill Terrell Avian Conservation Grant. Georgia Ornithological Society. Typical $35,000-50,000. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/bill-terrell-avian-conservation-grant-r76/ Dr. Bruce D. J. Batt Fellowship in Waterfowl Conservation. Ducks Unlimited Canada. Up to $5,000CA/year. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/dr-bruce-d-j-batt-fellowship-in-waterfowl-conservation-r218/ Frank M. Chapman Fellowship. American Museum of Natural History. Varies. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/frank-m-chapman-fellowship-r110/ Jed Burtt Undergraduate Mentoring Grants. $1,000 + travel costs. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/jed-burtt-undergraduate-mentoring-grants-r6/ North American Bluebird Society Grant. $500-$5,000. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/nabs-grant-r125/ Paul Stewart Avian Research Fund. Inland Bird Banding Association. Up to $1000. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/paul-stewart-avian-research-fund-r150/ Santa Monica Bay Audubon Society Small Grants for Field Study Projects. $550. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/small-grants-for-field-study-projects-r288/ Search the funding database for more grants with upcoming deadlines, and happy grant writing. https://ornithologyexchange.org/funding/grants/ **Note: sponsors update their websites all the time. I try to keep all of the links in this database active. If you find one that is broken, please let me know.
  10. Every spring in Australia is heralded by reports of magpies swooping at people. While it is of little comfort to those at the receiving end of a surprise attack, such events are actually quite rare when one considers the number of magpies across Australia, and the fact that they love to share our urban habitat with us. View the full article
  11. The Tarwater lab at the University of Wyoming is seeking 3 field technicians to work on our research projects focused on 1) the impacts of precipitation and fragmentation on bird populations and communities and 2) long-term demography of a suite of birds in central Panama. This is a unique opportunity to work in tropical rainforests hosting spectacular plant and animal communities, in addition to having the opportunity to interact with other researches and professors associated with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. The field season will last approximately six months, starting January 27th (Start date is flexible). Selected technicians will gain skills in a variety of avian field techniques while also working in a unique system. Duties include, but are not limited to, the following: 1) Point count censuses of army ant-follower birds 2) Army-Ant surveys 3) Behavioral observations of ant-follower birds 4) Bird banding. We will net birds across multiple forests and as part of the longest-running avian mist-netting project in the Neotropics. 5) Support other ongoing research projects and students coming to Panama during the summer (e.g., this can include helping record birds, working with manakins, etc.). 6) Data entry and maintenance of equipment. Applicants must have: - Previous experience in bird banding and conducting point counts. -A strong work ethic and dedication. - A good, professional attitude and outgoing nature. -Be in good enough physical condition to work in challenging conditions. The weather in Panama is hot and wet and there are many insects. -Ability to live with other 4-5 people and the flexibility to adapt quickly to changes in schedule if needed. Work weeks will be 5 days a week with early morning starts. Technicians are expected to enter data upon returning from the field. Compensation is $600/month with housing and flight to Panama provided. If interested, please send a letter of interest, your CV/resume, and information for three references to Laura Gómez-Murillo (lgomezmu@uwyo.edu). The deadline for applications is November 1st and will be reviewed as they are received. For more information visit:https://www.tarwaterlab.com.
  12. Coastal birds survive because their populations can absorb impacts and recover quickly from hurricanes -- even storms many times larger than anything previously observed. View the full article
  13. Some recent research suggests that educational achievement can be predicted based on differences in our genes. But does this really mean that genes set limits on an individual's academic potential? Or do these findings just reflect how standardized educational systems reward certain inborn learning styles and aptitudes at the expense of others? View the full article
  14. Hurricane Dorian was the second most powerful Atlantic hurricane on record and the fifth to reach the highest hurricane category (five) in the past four years. After it first made landfall, it hovered over the northern Bahamas for more than 50 hours. View the full article
  15. A tiny penguin that made the mammoth journey from New Zealand to Australia has been nursed back to health and released into the wild—in the hope it will find its own way home. View the full article
  16. A Ph.D. position in avian conservation ecology is available in the Şekercioğlu Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology lab, Department of Biology, University of Utah for highly-motivated biologists experienced in working independently. The application deadline is January 3, 2019 and there is no application fee. Prospective applicants should visit our lab website http://sekercioglu.biology.utah.edu/ and read some of our papers on https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cagan_Sekercioglu before emailing c.s@utah.edu. The Ph.D. student will be expected to undertake population biology and conservation ecology analyses on our long-term bird banding datasets from Ethiopia, Turkey, and Utah, and to lead bird banding at some of these locations. Having extensive field experience and a bird banding license will be a plus, but not required. There will also be opportunities for conducting avian macroecology, conservation, biogeography, life history, and evolutionary meta-analyses based on our global bird database, covering all the world's bird species and updated continuously. The University of Utah Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology program provides five years of Ph.D. funding and has strengths in various fields. Our Global Change & Ecosystem Center provides opportunities for broad interdisciplinary research, education and outreach. http://www.biology.utah.edu/graduate/index.php http://environment.utah.edu/ Students are encouraged to seek external Ph.D. funding opportunities such as NSF Graduate Fellowships or EPA-STAR Fellowships, and will have much better chances of acceptance with one. Feel free to contact me with any questions. Çağan H. Şekercioğlu, Ph.D. Associate Professor University of Utah Department of Biology 257 S. 1400 E. Rm. 201 Salt Lake City, UT. 84112 *Email: c.s@utah.edu* www.sekercioglu.org https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cagan_Sekercioglu
  17. The Penguin Genome Consortium sequences all living penguin species genomes to understand the evolution of life on the ice View the full article
  18. The Dayer Human Dimensions Lab in the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Techseeks to fill a M.S. position, working in close collaboration with the Smithsonian’s Virginia Working Landscapes Program (http://www.vaworkinglandscapes.org). The project will explore the value of several landowner outreach mechanisms (e.g., interactions with professional scientists, interactions with citizen scientists, and peer-to-peer networking events) in influencing landowner conservation behaviors. The student will have two three-month summer field seasons based in Front Royal, Virginia (housing provided at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute). The successful candidate will gain skills in qualitative and quantitative social science methods, as well as science co-production, working closely with university researchers, Smithsonian researchers and program managers, and a steering committee of citizen scientists and landowners. This approach will ensure that the project has utility for Smithsonian conservation programs and program participants. The successful candidate will be fully funded (tuition and stipend) on a combination of graduate research assistantships and graduate teaching assistantships for two full years. The candidate will be mentored by Dr. Ashley Dayer (http://www.dayer.fishwild.vt.edu/) and Dr. Amy Johnson (https://nationalzoo.si.edu/conservation/amy-em-johnson). Qualifications Applicants should have a strong interest and a prior degree in conservation biology, social sciences (preferably psychology, sociology, or communications), human dimensions, natural resources, or related discipline. Applicants should have past research experience (preferably social science or conservation biology), an outstanding academic record, and evidence of strong writing skills. Applicants must show an aptitude for co-produced science and communication with landowners and citizen scientists. Experience preferred: landowner outreach, other extension, or public education activities and conducting interviews or developing surveys. Start date for the assistantship is January 2020. Deadline for applications is Wednesday, October 16th. However, applications will be reviewed as they are received. To apply, please email a single PDF file to Dr. Ashley Dayer (dayer@vt.edu) containing (1) a one page cover letter outlining your research interests, career goals, and relevant experience for this position; (2) your CV; (3) undergraduate transcript(s) and GRE scores; and (4) full contact information for at least 3 professional references. The subject line of the email must read: Private Lands Graduate Position.
  19. The ancestor of some of the largest flying birds ever has been found in Waipara, New Zealand. View the full article
  20. Description: The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University (College Station) is seeking either a MS or PhD level student to participate in an ongoing research program in avian/wildlife ecology in south Texas. The work includes all vertebrate groups, although we are currently seeking a person with substantial experience identifying songbirds. The student will assist with the selection, training, and management of a large seasonal field crew. The specific thesis/dissertation project has not been specified; thus the student will have wide latitude in selecting a project. The student will also serve as a TA in ornithology during one semester; other TA opportunities might be available if so desired. The graduate position formally begin 1 September 2020, although preference will be given to applicants available to conduct field work starting spring to early summer 2020. Compensation ranges from $1700-2100 per month salary including summer; tuition and fees are covered. Qualifications: Must be skilled in the identification of songbirds. Previous work in statistics and GIS highly desirable. Excellent English writing and verbal communication skills are essential; a valid driver’s license is required. For MS level, minimum GPA of >3.3 preferred including good/excellent grades in the sciences (math, statistics, chemistry) and previous field experience required; publication experience desirable. For the Ph.D. level, must have finished (or about to finish) the MS thesis, previous experience training and leading a field crew, and evidence of previous and ongoing publication in peer-reviewed journals required. Review of applicants will begin upon receipt, and the position will remain open until a suitable candidate is found. Applications received by 31 October 2019 will receive consideration. Interested individuals should send, as a single pdf, a letter of interest, CV, unofficial copies of transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information (current email and phone) for 3 references via email to: Dr Michael Morrison, Professor and Caesar Kleberg Chair mlmorrison@tamu.edu . All applicants will be acknowledged and kept updated on your status.
  21. New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Porto (CIBIO-InBIO) shows how global warming could reduce the mating activity and success of grassland birds. View the full article
  22. Queen's University researcher Vicki Friesen (Biology) and former postdoctoral fellow Debbie Leigh are sounding the alarm over the increasing loss of the genetic variation that allows species to adapt to the rapid and drastic environmental changes being generated by human activity. View the full article
  23. We usually think of a species as being reproductively isolated—that is, not mating with other species in the wild. Occasionally, however, closely related species do interbreed. New research just published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances documents the existence of a previously undiscovered hybrid zone along the coast of northern California and southern Oregon, where two closely related bird hummingbirds, Allen's Hummingbird and Rufous Hummingbird, are blurring species boundaries. Researchers hope that studying cases such as this one could improve their understanding of how biodiversity is created and maintained. View the full article
  24. We are soliciting applications for a graduate research assistantship (M.S. in Biology or Ph.D. in Environmental Science) focused on understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on Loggerhead Shrikes. The student will be primarily advised by Dr. Than Boves at Arkansas State University, but will work in collaboration with Drs. Brett DeGregorio (University of Arkansas), Lori Neuman-Lee (Arkansas State University), and Amy Chabot (African Lion Safari/Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada), as well as with a PhD student at the University of Arkansas. The research will be centered on study sites in Arkansas and will consist of capturing and collecting blood and fecal samples from adult and nestling shrikes occupying a variety of habitats (e.g., intensive agriculture, native grasslands, pastures), conducting endocrinological and immunological lab work, monitoring survival and reproduction of marked individuals, and analyzing pesticide and fecal dietary data in relation to a variety of factors. Applicants must have a B.S. (for M.S. position) or M.S. (for Ph.D. position) in wildlife ecology, biology, or related field. Ideal candidates will have: (a) a sincere passion for avian ecology and conservation; (b) competitive GPA and GRE scores; (c) significant field experience that includes capturing, handling, and bleeding birds; (d) above average quantitative, writing, and oral communication skills; and (e) strong interpersonal skills as regular interaction with landowners, agency personnel, and other interested stakeholders will be expected. Applications will be accepted until 15 November 2019, although applications received sooner may be given early consideration, and the position is expected to begin in July 2020 (student will start coursework Fall 2020). Applicants should send (via email as a single .pdf) a cover letter that details why they are interested in the position along with their applicable experience and qualifications, a CV, copies of transcripts (unofficial is fine) and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Than Boves at tboves@astate.edu.
  25. We are soliciting applications for a graduate research assistantship (M.S. in Biology or Ph.D. in Environmental Science) focused on understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on Loggerhead Shrikes. The student will be primarily advised by Dr. Than Boves at Arkansas State University, but will work in collaboration with Drs. Brett DeGregorio (University of Arkansas), Lori Neuman-Lee (Arkansas State University), and Amy Chabot (African Lion Safari/Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada), as well as with a PhD student at the University of Arkansas. The research will be centered on study sites in Arkansas and will consist of capturing and collecting blood and fecal samples from adult and nestling shrikes occupying a variety of habitats (e.g., intensive agriculture, native grasslands, pastures), conducting endocrinological and immunological lab work, monitoring survival and reproduction of marked individuals, and analyzing pesticide and fecal dietary data in relation to a variety of factors. Applicants must have a B.S. (for M.S. position) or M.S. (for Ph.D. position) in wildlife ecology, biology, or related field. Ideal candidates will have: (a) a sincere passion for avian ecology and conservation; (b) competitive GPA and GRE scores; (c) significant field experience that includes capturing, handling, and bleeding birds; (d) above average quantitative, writing, and oral communication skills; and (e) strong interpersonal skills as regular interaction with landowners, agency personnel, and other interested stakeholders will be expected. Applications will be accepted until 15 November 2019, although applications received sooner may be given early consideration, and the position is expected to begin in July 2020 (student will start coursework Fall 2020). Applicants should send (via email as a single .pdf) a cover letter that details why they are interested in the position along with their applicable experience and qualifications, a CV, copies of transcripts (unofficial is fine) and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Than Boves at tboves@astate.edu.
  26. Earlier
  27. DNA tests have proven an extinct bird species unique to the Canary Islands—whose loss was considered a sizeable blow for genetic diversity—is actually almost identical to types commonly found in the UK and throughout Europe. View the full article
  28. In the past half-billion years, Earth has been hit again and again by mass extinctions, wiping out most species on the planet. And every time, life recovered and ultimately went on to increase in diversity. View the full article
  29. The Trump administration announced Thursday its final plan to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling, giving the petroleum industry access to the pristine wildland for the first time. View the full article
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