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Found 11 results

  1. 2018 SUMMER FIELD COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT TROPICAL AVIAN ECOLOGY (TAE C-18) COURSE LOCATION: Bocas del Toro Biological Station, Boca del Drago, Isla Colon, Republic of Panama. The biological station is located on a hill facing Almirante Bay and Volcan Baru on the mainland. Coral reef and lowland tropical rainforest ecosystems are immediately accessible from the field station. This juxtaposition of the two most biologically diverse ecosystems along with Panama's rich cultural diversity provides tremendous opportunities for education and research. See http://www.itec-edu.org for details. INSTRUCTOR: Julio Gallardo, Ph.D. cand., Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Mississippi State University, USGS Mississippi Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Phone: 662-341-6617. Email: fcg384@msstate.edu, jcgallardodelangel@gmail.com COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will start with a gentle introduction to the ecology of tropical birds and their habitats. We will then analyze fundamental concepts of evolution and ecology and discuss bird conservation issues. The main purpose of the course is to provide students with a relevant background in ecology, biogeography, and evolution to build an understanding of natural history as it links to social issues and bird conservation in the tropical Americas. We will be discussing ecological constraints that shape bird diversity in terms of behavioral adaptations, habitats, sexual selection and the evolution of tropical birds. The course will be composed of lectures and critiques of research articles aiming to foster class discussions in which students will help each other breakdown arguments into their various components to question and evaluate them. We will also spend a good amount of time outdoors watching birds, linking class with field observations. Through the length of the course, we will nurse the value of educated observations in ecology to identify patterns, ask questions, and find creative answers to practical problems. Students will learn the principles of bird study design and the basic use of analytical tools to address a research question and conservation needs. The course includes a practical component, where students will design and implement field projects individually and in small groups. COURSE TOPICS: · Introduction to the tropics Tropical origins Tropical environments · Introduction to Neotropical birds Introduction to bird identification Neotropical bird families Biogeography of Neotropical avifauna Birds of Central America and Panama · Behavioral Ecology of tropical birds Life history traits and breeding seasons Principals of sexual selection and mating systems Territoriality and communication · Niche concept and tropical birds Evolution of the concept Abundance, distribution, and niche Niche on a macroscale · Introduction to bird migration The migratory process Migration patterns Population constraints and migration Bird migration in the Americas · Introduction to tropical island ecology Introduction to island theory Island biotas and island adaptations Island Conservation · Animal abundance estimation Reasons behind commonness and rarity: the big picture Speciation in the tropics Introduction to habitat selection in birds · From populations to communities Introduction to population Introduction to community ecology Measures of diversity · Project design How to design a research project Behavioral studies Monitoring projects · Data management and analysis Introduction to statistical inference Introduction to program R Basic statistical tools in R Introduction to abundance and occupancy modeling in R READINGS: Readings corresponding to lecture-topics will be assigned from the course text and from relevant articles in the primary literature. In addition, each student will read, critique, and provide oral reports on published papers from the primary literature. REQUIRED TEXTS: Hilty, S. 2005. Birds of the tropical Americas: a watcher’s introduction to behavior, breeding and diversity. Texas University Press, Austin, TX. Kricher, J. 2017. The new Neotropical companion. Princeton University Press, Princeton. Angehr, G.R. and R. Dean, 2010. The Birds of Panama, Zona Tropical Publications, Ithaca, New York. FIELD BOOK: A field book will be required in the course. The field book will contain all data related to group projects and the independent research project. The field book should also contain all other incidental observations such as species lists, bird behavioral notes, etc., and contain detailed location information. The field book must be waterproof and either pencil or waterproof ink used to record data. BOQUETE CLOUD FOREST FIELD TRIP: This field trip will allow students the opportunity to visit other areas of Panama, to experience Panamanian culture, and to visit tropical cloud and seasonal forests firsthand. We travel in ITEC boats to the mainland and then by chartered bus to Boquete which lies at the base of 11,000 ft. Volcan Baru. The bus trip will take us up and over the central mountain range and through Palo Seco Protected Area. Several stops will be made in route. COURSE LENGTH: ITEC Summer field courses are about four weeks in length. The TAE C-18 course will run from July 15, through August 9, 2018. TUITION: $2250 USD. Tuition fee includes all lodging, meals and airport transfers in Bocas del Toro. The tuition also covers transportation and lodging during the 3-day cloud forest field trip on the mainland. A $100 lab fee is applicable to this course. REGISTRATION DEADLINE: June 15, 2018. The course is limited to 10 students and applications will be evaluated as they arrive. Applications can be found at http://www.itec-edu.org/application.pdf. If you believe that your application may arrive late, notify ITEC. GRADING & CREDIT: Up to 6 units of credit will be given, 3 for the lecture portion and 3 for the field portion. A letter grade will be assigned based on exams, research reports and presentations, lecture attendance, and participation in discussions and activities. Course credit must be arranged at the student's institution. Contact ITEC for details.

 CONTACT: Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation, 2911 NW 40th PL, Gainesville, FL 32605, phone: 352-367-9128, email: itec@itec-edu.org, web: http://www.itec-edu.org. ITEC is a 501©(3) non-profit organization founded in 1996.
  2. Field Projects International is offering a new field course on tropical ornithology this summer. This course will begin by exploring basic bird biology, as well as the diversity of avian species in the Amazon. It will include both daily exercises and nightly lectures focused on avian natural history, evolution, and taxonomy. Next, we will focus on survey methods, which are crucial for understanding population declines due to climate change, habitat loss, and other causes. Conservation actions aimed at preserving avian diversity and the habitats that they share with other species depend on information gained through the techniques we will practice, such as deploying mist nets or conducting point counts and line transects. Finally, we will examine basic interactions between birds and their habitats, review and analyze research articles, weigh conservation issues and strategies, and discuss the implementation of ornithological projects in the wild. Along the way, you will be able to canoe in a nearby oxbow lake featuring giant river otters and hoatzins, paddle through a palm swamp while spotting caiman and frogs, and climb a 60-meter tower to view the forest canopy and watch for macaws en route to their morning clay licks. COURSE DATES June 16th – July 3rd, 2017 REGISTRATION Course size is limited, spots are filled on a rolling basis until April 17th, 2017 COURSE FEE $2250 (includes all meals at the field station, lodging, and transportation from Puerto Maldonado to the field site and back) MORE INFORMATION https://fieldprojects.org/participate/courses-2/tropical-ornithology LOCATION This course will be held at the Los Amigos Biological Station, also known by its Spanish acronym EBLA (Estación Biológica Río Los Amigos). Situated between the Madre de Dios and Los Amigos Rivers on terra firme forest rising above the floodplain, this field station was established in 2000 and boasts incredible biodiversity that includes 11 primate species and 595 species of bird.
  3. Advances in Field Methods for Studying Songbird and Raptor Migration August 23 - August 29 Eagle Hill Institute, Steuben, Maine Taught by Adrienne Leppold and David Brinker in one of North America’s most spectacular and pristine natural areas, the coast of eastern Maine from Acadia National Park to Petit Manan National Wildlife Refuge and beyond. Course participants include advanced amateurs, graduate and undergraduate students, teachers, professional field biologists, university professors, and personnel from federal and state agencies and numerous environmental organizations. For general program information, click here For more information including the syllabus, contact Marilyn Mayer: marilyn@eaglehill.us or 207-546-2821 Course Description More than 300 species of birds occur in Maine at some point in their life cycle. Maine is a nexus of activity for both breeding birds and migrant individuals. This course has been scheduled to overlap the transition period from the breeding season into fall migration. The main topics of the course include 1) methods for capturing and marking wild birds, 2) methods for studying avian migration behavior, and 3) data analysis/application. Days will primarily be spent in the field; however some afternoon/evening sessions will be reserved for dealing with statistical challenges and approaches. In particular, banding data are often amassed but not analyzed. This course will be ideal for professors, graduate students, state or federal biologists, and upper level undergraduates looking to gain exposure to a diverse skill set in avian sampling methodologies. Field and classroom topics include, but are not limited to, mist-netting (passive and target with play-back), banding, in-hand age and sex determination, use of auxillary markers, and various emerging tracking technologies. Field portions will be focused on the capture and study of songbirds and raptors and can be flexible given the specific interests and skill levels of participants. This course will be most beneficial for those with an existing knowledge of basic ornithological principles and species identification skills. About the Instructors Adrienne Jo Leppold (aleppold@gmail.com) is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Maine studying behavioral ecology of landbird migrants in the Gulf of Maine. Her work has made groundbreaking strides in understanding the movement of landbirds through the region and led to the creation of an international, multi-agency initiative to study bird migration in the Gulf of Maine region. She has over 10 years experience working with training others in field ornithology practices. While her studies have focused passerines, near passerines, and seabirds, she is also experienced with raptors and shorebirds She has an extraordinary knowledge of songbird molt patterns and identification and is one of a couple hundred people licensed as a North American Banding trainer. She has co-authored several banding manuals used by banding stations throughout North American and recommended by the USGS Bird Banding Laboratory. David Brinker (dfbrinker@verizon.net) is an ecologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resource’s Natural Heritage Program where he has worked on biodiversity conservation since 1989. His raptor experience covers most of 40 years, and he has worked with colonial nesting waterbirds and secretive marsh birds in the Chesapeake Bay for 30 years. He is the founder of Project Owlnet and co-founder of Project SNOWstorm, two highly successful cooperative efforts to study migrating and wintering owls using bird banding and radio telemetry. Since 1994, he has led the Central Appalachian Goshawk Study in Maryland, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. For many years, Dave was affiliated with a long-term raptor banding and migration monitoring effort along the western shore of Green Bay. He has authored or coauthored papers on Northern Goshawk population change, Red-tailed Hawk migration, Northern Saw-whet ecology and movement, American Oystercatcher distribution, as well as on secretive marsh birds and colonial nesting waterbirds.
  4. Es un placer para la Sociedad de Ornitología Neotropical dar a conocer el curso de campo"Ecología de Aves Tropicales", organizado por el Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation (ITEC). El mismo será dictado por el PhD. Scott T. Walter (Tulane University, EE.UU.), del 20 de julio al 9 de agosto de 2015, en la estación biológica que posee el ITEC en Isla Colon (Bocas del Toro, Panamá). El curso enfatizará en el aprendizaje en el campo de técnicas de observación y muestreo de aves; también se desarrollarán clases teóricas y discusiones de artículos científicos. Encuentra mas información sobre la inscripción, posibilidades de becas a estudiantes latinoamericanos y el detalle del programa en: http://itec-edu.org/tropical-avian-ecology/ It is a pleasure for the Neotropical Ornithological Society to advertise the field course "Tropical Avian Ecology", organized by the Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation (ITEC), which will be presented by the PhD. Scott T. Walter (Tulane University, USA). The course will take place from July 20th to August 9th 2015, in the field station that ITEC has on Isla Colon (Bocas del Toro, Panama). It will emphasize the learning of field technics for avian observation and sampling; besides, there will be theoretical lectures and discussion sessions on scientific papers. Find more information about registration, availability of tuition scholarships for Latin American students, and details on the course programe, at: http://itec-edu.org/tropical-avian-ecology/
  5. Join a two-week field course at Shoals Marine Laboratory on Appledore Island, Maine. May 22 - June 5, 2015. Taught by Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Dr. David Bonter, this course uses the diverse and abundant birds of the Isles of Shoals as your primary lab material as you gain an understanding of avian ecology. Live among nesting eiders, Herring Gulls, and Great Black-backed Gulls. Course topics include avian diversity, anatomy, ecology, physiology, and behavior. Field techniques include field identification, bird banding, and various census methods. Prerequisites: One semester of college level biology or equivalent; background in ornithology or vert biology is recommended, but not required. Earn college credit at Cornell University or University of New Hampshire. Shoals Marine Laboratory is a Joint facilty of Cornell and UNH. To learn more or enroll: www.shoalsmarine.laboratory.org
  6. 2015 SUMMER COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT (July 15-Aug 9) FIELD COURSE IN TROPICAL AVIAN ECOLOGY (TAE C-15) COURSE LOCATION: Bocas del Toro Biological Station, Boca del Drago, Isla Colon, Republic of Panama. The biological station is located on a hill facing the Caribbean Sea. Coral reef and seagrass ecosystems lie in front of the station and lowland tropical rain forests surround us. This juxtaposition of the two most biologically diverse ecosystems provides tremendous opportunities for education and research. See: http://www.itec-edu.org/ for details. INSTRUCTOR: Scott T. Walter, Ph.D., Tulane University, tel: 337-591-1188, email: scott.t.walter@gmail.com, Specialty: bird ecology, reproduction, behavior, systematics and conservation. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will begin with an introduction to the ecology and conservation of tropical birds within the context of how a wide range of species utilize and interact with diverse ecosystems. We will learn extensive field identification techniques to facilitate identification of a variety of bird species from families common in the U.S., as well as species in families unique to the Neotropics. Field observations will also be used to identify various bird guilds, and to study avian habitat use across different landscapes around the ITEC field station. A review of avian conservation topics will then transition the class into field research. Following training in ecological study design, students will form small groups to conduct research projects. We will address data management, statistical analysis, and presentation techniques as students prepare to orally present their research results. Finally, each student will design and implement an independent research project that includes data analysis and formal presentation. Lectures in research manuscript preparation will guide students in writing short reports on group and individual research projects. FORMAL LECTURES: Throughout the course there will be classroom lectures that provide the foundation for the avian ecology and conservation information that we will further observe and study in the field. As different birds are active at different times of the day and night, our schedule will vary to accommodate the study of particular species. The majority of our time will be spent observing and studying birds in the field. Lecture topics may include: Tropical bird background Residents and migratory species Bird field identification Avian guilds Niche partitioning: habitat use vs. availability Bird conservation topics Bird research in the tropics Importance of seed dispersal by birds Bird demographic measures Research paper critiquing Experimental design and data collection Research implementation; planning and logistics Data management Statistical analysis Research presentation pointers Research manuscript preparation INFORMAL LECTURES: Informal lectures will be provided periodically during orientation walks, during group field projects or in discussion groups. These will cover a wide variety of topics and will generally be prompted by what we encounter in the field, or by the direction taken during group discussions. READINGS: Readings corresponding to lecture subjects will be assigned in the texts. We will also read and critique papers brought by students and faculty and additional readings may be assigned from time to time. TEXTS, READINGS AND HANDOUTS: - The Birds of Panama, George R. Angehr and Robert Dean. Zona Tropical Publications. 2010. ISBN: 978-0-9798804-5-2. - Select readings from Behavioral Ecology of Tropical Birds, Bridget J.M. Stutchbury and Eugene S. Morton. Academic Press 2001, 165pp. ISBN: 978-0-12-675555-8. - Select readings from Ornithology, Third Edition, Frank Gill, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, 2007. ISBN 978-0-71-674983-7 - Select research articles. FIELD BOOK: A water-proof field notebook will be required in the course. The field book will contain all data related to group projects and independent research project. The field book should also contain all other incidental observations such as species lists, behavioral notes, etc., and contain detailed location information. FIELD PROJECTS: Course emphasis will be placed on hands-on experience with a wide variety of bird observation and sampling techniques. Field outings may include: Field observations, sampling and survey techniques Use of mist nets Seed dispersal by birds Use of rocket-, woosh, or cannon nets Bird morphometric measures Seabird colony visit to Bird Island Dawn chorus auditory observation Nocturnal bird auditory observation Point count surveys Habitat use vs. availability surveys Nesting behavior Foraging behavior INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROJECTS: Following group project completion and professor feedback, students will develop an ecological research question of their own interest, design a study, and implement the project. Students will be given independence to conduct these studies while the instructor provides oversight and mentoring as needed. Projects will culminate in presentations to the student body, faculty, and staff at the ITEC research station, as well as to interested locals. Research manuscripts from these projects will serve as the final project for the course. BOQUETE CLOUD FOREST FIELD TRIP: This three-day field trip takes place midway through the course and will allow students the opportunity to experience assemblages of birds found in tropical cloud and seasonally dry forests. We travel in ITEC boats to the mainland and then by private bus to the town of Boquete which lies at the base of 11,000 ft. Volcan Baru. The bus trip will take us up and over the central mountain range and through remote Palo Seco National Park. Several stops will be made in route. COURSE LENGTH: ITEC Summer field courses are about four weeks in length. The TAE C-15 course will run from July 15 through August 9, 2015. TUITION: $2150 USD. Tuition fee includes all lodging, meals and airport transfers in Bocas del Toro. The tuition also covers transportation and lodging during the cloud forest field trip to Boquete. REGISTRATION DEADLINE: June 15, 2015. The course is limited to 10 students and applications will be evaluated as they arrive. If you believe that your application may arrive late, notify ITEC. GRADING and COURSE CREDIT: Up to 6 units of credit will be given, 3 for the lecture portion and 3 for the field portion. A letter grade will be assigned based on exams, reports, proposals, attendance at lectures, as well as by less tangibles such as personal attitude, motivation, and contribution to the course. Course credit must be arranged through the student's institution. Contact ITEC for details. APPLICATIONS can be found at: http://itec-edu.org/education-programs/application/. A LIST OF AREA BIRDS found at the field station and adjacent mainland areas can be found at http://itec-edu.org/bocas-del-toro-bird-list/. CONTACT: Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation, 2911 NW 40th PL, Gainesville, FL 32605, tel: 352-367-9128, email: itec@itec-edu.org, web: http://www.itec-edu.org. ITEC is a 501©(3) non-profit organization founded in 1996.
  7. SUMMER ARCTIC FIELD COURSE "Field Studies in Arctic Ecosystems" will be offered on the coast of Hudson Bay from August 7-19 this year. COURSE LOCATION: Fieldwork will be conducted within the largest wetland in North America, the Hudson Bay Lowlands and will be based at Nester One Field Camp in Wapusk National Park, Churchill Northern Studies Centre, as well as the town of Churchill, Manitoba and other field locations. INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Ryan Brook, College of Agriculture and Bioresources ryan.brook@usask.ca Dr. Brook has been doing fieldwork in the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem for >20 years and he has been leading this field school annually since 2004. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This field-based travel course will provide hands-on research experience in natural ecosystems in the sub-arctic of the Hudson Bay coast in northern Manitoba at the interface between animals, people, and the environment. This experiential course is an intensive introduction to and connection between the ecology and Aboriginal cultures of the sub-arctic. Students contribute to collecting long-term wildlife and habitat monitoring projects on polar bears and permafrost as well as designing and conducting their own field research projects. FOR MORE INFORMATION: ryan.brook@usask.ca
  8. http://hogisland.audubon.org/spring-seabird-biology-and-conservation Take an active part in helping to restore Maine seabirds by joining pioneering researcher Dr. Stephen Kress, and other Project Puffin biologists with National Audubon Society's internationally renowned Seabird Restoration Program. Work alongside Audubon biologists to census a nesting colony of Herring Gulls, Great Black-backed Gulls, and Common Eiders. This session provides an opportunity to land on islands that are usually off limits and a chance to learn about seabird identification, bird banding, adaptations, migration, ecology and seabird conservation. During this program you will help researchers conduct a detailed census of hundreds of gull eggs, chicks and eider nests to measure the health of nesting seabird colonies and assist with the removal of marine debris that can entangle seabirds. You will see puffins and terns at Eastern Egg Rock and the Great Blue Heron nesting colony on Wreck Island. Due to the large numbers of breeding birds on Eastern Egg Rock at this time, we will not land on Eastern Egg Rock. Weather permitting, we will land on Wreck Island to see the Great Blue Heron colony. "I feel honored and proud about being able to help restore tern habitat. I'm grateful that I discovered this interesting and stimulating program and look forward to coming back!" - Sheila, New Jersey This popular program is presented in association with Road Scholar (Elderhostel, Inc.) and is open to adults 21+ years old. Participants should be able to disembark onto small landing boats and walk easily over uneven terrain. Register for the 2013 program by calling Road Scholar (toll-free) 1-800-454-5768, or register online. This popular program is presented in association with Road Scholar (Elderhostel, Inc.) and is open to adults 21+ years old. Participants should be able to disembark onto small landing boats and walk easily over uneven terrain.
  9. The Institute for Sustainable International Studies, ISIS Belize, offers a variety of conservation and environmental field courses in Belize, Central America. We are particularly excited to offer a new introductory course in tropical ornithology. The course examines the biology, ecology, diversity, behaviour and basic field techniques as well as field identification of birds found in Belize. Students will spend time at the Belize Zoo, at rescue and rehabilitation centres and explore birds in several different ecosystems (marine, savannah, tropical broadleaf forest and mountains). The courses are held in the field, forests, sea and waterways of this incredible developing country. Students will experience and understand first-hand the wonders and challenges of different environments and their inhabitants. All courses are intensive, delivering 3 credit hours over two weeks. Students can pair another course for a full four weeks studying abroad. The courses also offer students a chance to explore the rich cultural, social and environmental resources in the tropical setting of English-speaking Belize. The ISIS field courses below are linked to our website, for schedules and syllabi: NEW! Ornithology in the Tropics: Birds of Belize NEW! Tropical Forests: The Management and Conservation of Biodiversity Wildlife Medicine, Biology and Conservation Tropical Marine Conservation Biology* Indigenous Knowledge in the 21st Century NEW! Tropical Ecosystems: New Approaches to Sustainability A two week course is $2,675 and the two course session is $4,225*, during June and July, 2014. These courses are also offered during a shorter winter session over the winter break, December 26, 2014– January 7, 2015. Students tell us these courses are “worth every penny!” Transcripts are issued from Sacred Heart College in San Ignacio, Belize or for those students needing transcripts from a US university, click here for details.
  10. 2012 SUMMER COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT (July 15-August 9) FIELD COURSE IN TROPICAL ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (TAB C-12), http://www.itec-edu.org/behavior3.html. COURSE LOCATION: Bocas del Toro Biological Station, Boca del Drago, Isla Colon, Republic of Panama. The biological station is located on a beach facing the Caribbean Sea. Coral reef and seagrass ecosystems lie out in front of the station and lowland tropical rain forests lie directly behind. This juxtaposition of the two most biologically diverse ecosystems provides tremendous opportunities for education and research. See Panama: http://www.itec-edu.org/index.html for details. INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Peter N. Lahanas, Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation, 2911 NW 40th PL, Gainesville, FL 32605, 352-367-9128, lahanas@itec-edu.org. Specialty: Neotropical herpetology, forest ecology, animal behavior, biogeography, molecular genetics of sea turtles. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will emphasize animal behavior in the context of tropical rain forest ecosystem. The material covered is equivalent to a university upper level course in animal behavior. The course is divided into three parts. During the first few days students will become familiar with the many ecosystems found in our area and with the trail systems during "orientation" walks. The bulk of the first 10 days will be spent learning field techniques and carrying out various group projects or exercises (see below). Midway through the course the entire station community takes a 3-day field trip to cloud forests of Boquete (see details below). On returning to the field station, students work on their individual research projects and continue to receive lectures or other activities in the evening. Formal lectures Formal lectures will take place in the classroom and will include the use of PowerPoint presentations and chalkboard. Lectures will generally be given in the evening so that more daylight hours can be spent in the field. Lecture topics will include: Station policies, forest etiquette Animal behavior, an overview Behavioral research design Neotropical ecosystems and structure Behavioral sampling methods Neotropical amphibians and reptiles Neotropical birds Neotropical mammals Mating systems Plant-animal interactions, symbioses Evolution of polymorphism in poison dart frogs Conservation issues Informal Lectures Informal lectures will be provided periodically during orientation walks, during group field projects or in discussion groups. These will cover a wide variety of topics and will generally be prompted by what we encounter in the field, or by the direction taken during group discussions. Readings Readings corresponding to lecture subjects will be assigned in the texts. We will also read and critique papers brought by students and faculty and additional readings may be assigned from time to time. In addition, each student will read, critique, and provide oral reports on published papers brought to Bocas. Required Texts: Martin, P. & P. Bateson (1993). Measuring Behaviour, Cambridge University Press, 222 pg, ISBN 0 521 44614 7. Kricher, J.C. (1997). A Neotropical Companion. 2nd. ed. Princeton University Press, Princeton. Field Book A field book will be required in the course. The field book will contain all data related to group projects and independent research project. The field book should also contain all other incidental observations such as species lists, behavioral notes, etc., and contain detailed location information. The field book must be water-proof and either pencil or water-proof ink used to record data. Group Field Projects, Exercises, Demonstrations and Excursions Group projects designed by the faculty and worked on in groups of four or six students. The purpose of these projects is to familiarize students with an array of field sampling techniques and equipment commonly used in field studies. With help from a faculty member, students set up projects, collect data, and generally (depends on the project), analyze data, present the results to the class, and write a report. Group Project, Demonstration and Excursion Topics Behavioral sampling methods Ethogram exercise Ecological sampling methods Forest night hikes Homing behavior in poison-dart frog Tail flicking behavior in geckos Soropta Beach, nesting leatherbacks Lekking in golden-collared manakins Cave ecology, bats behavior Soropta canal, Iguanas, caimans and crocodiles Resource partitioning in frog breeding colonies Marine turtle nesting behavior Individual Research Projects Working closely with faculty, students will be responsible for designing and completing an original animal behavior research project of their choosing. These projects will be carried out during the second half of the course and students will have about 10 days for data collection. A few days before the end of the course students will analyze their data, write a technical report, prepare a PowerPoint presentation of their work and orally present their findings at a station-wide symposium on the last day of the course. BOQUETE CLOUD FOREST FIELD TRIP: This three-day field trip takes place midway through the course and will allow students the opportunity to experience assemblages of amphibians and reptiles found in tropical cloud and seasonal forests. We travel in ITEC boats to the mainland and then by private bus to the town of Boquete which lies at the base of 11,000 ft Volcan Baru. The bus trip will take us up and over the central mountain range and through remote Palo Seco National Park. Several stops will be made in route. COURSE LENGTH: ITEC Summer field courses are four weeks in length. The TAB C-11 will run from July 15 through August 9, 2012. TUITION: $2050 USD. Tuition fee includes all lodging, meals and airport transfers in Bocas del Toro. The tuition also covers transportation and lodging during the 3-day cloud forest field trip on the mainland. REGISTRATION DEADLINE: May 15, 2012. The course is limited to 15 students and applications will be evaluated as they arrive. If you believe that your application may arrive late, notify ITEC. GRADING and COURSE CREDIT: Up to 6 units of credit will be given, 3 for the lecture portion and 3 for the field portion. A letter grade will be assigned based on exams, reports, proposals, attendance at lectures, as well as by less tangibles such as personal attitude, motivation, and contribution to the course. Course credit must be arranged at the student's institution. Contact ITEC for details. CONTACT: Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation, 2911 NW 40th PL, Gainesville, FL 32605, 352-367-9128, itec@itec-edu.org, http://www.itec-edu.org/index.html.
  11. This field course is not yet posted on ITEC's pages, but will be soon. Field Course in Ecology and Conservation Biology Focus – Island Biogeography and birds as model animals for learning to use statistical tools to analyze animal abundance, within the context of the Bocas del Toro Archipelago. Instructor – James J. Roper (jjroper AT gmail.com, and http://sites.google.com/site/jjroper/) Dates: 23 July to 9 August 2012 Details: We are offering a multi-cultural field course that will start with training the student in the local avifauna of the island of Colon, in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago, AND, the using three very useful and interesting statistical programs for studying animal diversity and abundance – EstimateS, PRESENCE and DISTANCE (all free programs that you can download and install prior to the course). We will quickly put those tools to work on the island where we will carry out many transects in different habitats to apply those data to the use of these programs. To do so, we will divide ourselves into smaller teams so that we may cover more ground. We will then proceed to other islands (once we are all up to running speed) and do several transects on as many islands as possible. We will close the course by combining these data into a coherent and interesting study of diversity and abundance of these birds on the island, putting this into a context of island biogeography. Additional statistical analysis may use the program R, and within it, the BiodiversityR package (also free). Throughout the study, we will use the relevant literature and have many discussions about the theory and application of these ideas. Prior to the course, the instructor will communicate with the students providing a list of reading, mostly PDF files that can be shared among those in the course. Who can take the course? Clearly the course will be somewhat advanced, so students who wish to take the course should have already taken at least one course in statistics, and be interested in learning birds (while the methods can be applied to a whole variety of taxa, birds are probably the easiest models to use in a quick field course). In addition to graduate students, we will consider advanced undergraduate students who can convince the instructor with a well-written objective letter that they deserve to take the course. Also, as we feel as an institute that it is very important to have cross-cultural interactions while studying conservation and ecology in a tropical environment, Spanish and Portuguese speaking students are welcome to attend. Clearly, if everybody speaks some English, and some Portuguese or Spanish, communication will be much easier. The instructor, Jim Roper (Ph.D.), is fluent in all three languages, and wants to carry out this experiment in a multicultural multispecies interaction. We will work together to develop teams that will combine their interests and skills so that all teams work well together and have a fascinating time learning. Costs: See the web site for tuition rates. Students from Central and South America, who attend shools in Central and South America, and are accepted for the course, will all receive the same scholarship – the course at half price. By this scholarship, we recognize that with the exchange rate and local economies being what they are, this scholarship pursues our goals and interests in collaborating with students in these countries and contributing to the general state of education and conservation. Also, because we will be going to the islands as often as possible, we will have a small surcharge of $5 from each student for each boat trip. Additional information: Please get in contact with Jim Roper (jjroper AT gmail.com, and http://sites.google.com/site/jjroper/) with any questions. Please read over the web pages at ITEC as well to better understand the field station and situation in Panamá.
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