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BirdLife International

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  1. BirdLife International

    Saving the Helmeted Hornbill

    The Helmeted Hornbill is under threat from a resurgence in demand for carvings made from its solid red casque. The trade is so intense that the bird is now Critically Endangered. Can it be saved?View the full article
  2. 23 Andean Condors have been killed in Patagonia, Argentina, by a strong pesticide whose sale is prohibited in the country. These attacks follow ones in Jujuy and Mendoza provinces, and have conservation organizations extremely worried, as they represent a severe threat to the species.View the full article
  3. As ice caps melt and sea levels rise, the survival of penguins will depend on their ability to adapt and relocate to new habitats. Now, a new genetic study reveals that some species may be better at adjusting than others.View the full article
  4. Berlenga Island, off the West coast of Portugal, has a new inhabitant: the Band-rumped Storm-petrel. A female of this threatened species has laid an egg on the island, thanks to work by the EU-funded LIFE Berlengas project.View the full article
  5. BirdLife's Preventing Extinctions Programme is celebrating its 10th anniversary. What are its 'Top 10' successes?View the full article
  6. Researchers celebrate breeding success in South Korea for the Chinese Crested Tern – a bird once thought extinct. Decoy model birds have helped bolster the new colony, and the species has been spotted in Japan for the first time.View the full article
  7. The recovery of the Northern Bald Ibis and Pink Pigeon are big news – but what about the other birds in this year’s Red List update? Some you may recognise, others you may not, but their stories can tell us a lot about the state of the natural world. Here are the highlights.View the full article
  8. Once down to just 10 individuals in the wild, Pink Pigeon populations are now stabilizing, and Northern Bald Ibis numbers are on the rise, according to BirdLife’s latest assessment of the extinction risk of the world’s birds.View the full article
  9. Our Slovenian partner DOPPS reports on the alarming discovery of a huge shipment of illegally killed birds discovered in Slovenia en route to Italy last month. Significant numbers of Red-thorated pipit, White wagtail and Meadow pipit were found amongst a haul of over a thousand individuals birds.View the full article
  10. The Alliance for Zero Extinction has mapped 1,483 highly threatened species that are only found at a single site. This major new assessment highlights the urgent need for better protection of these irreplaceable locations.View the full article
  11. A new study used tracking data from 52 seabirds over 20 years to help scientists understand how to best protect them.View the full article
  12. We interview the leader of the Albatross Task Force in Argentina, Leandro Tamini, who has won the Marsh Award for Marine Conservation Leadership, which recognises people or organisations having a profound impact on marine conservation.View the full article
  13. This month, wetlands containing one of Singapore’s last remaining mangroves have secured protection after years of concerted advocacy. This move will benefit globally threatened birds such as the Chinese Egret and Straw-headed Bulbul.View the full article
  14. Community nature reserves are not only improving habitats for rare grassland birds, but also proving a vital lifeline for cattle farmers, literally saving lives during drought. But how has the Liben Lark responded to this initiative?View the full article
  15. 40 years ago, we set out to identify the most important sites for birds in Europe. This idea has since spread across the world, informing conservation decisions and setting the model for wider initiatives to follow suit. We recount our top successes in that time.View the full article
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