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BirdLife International

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  1. Our Slovenian partner DOPPS reports on the alarming discovery of a huge shipment of illegally killed birds discovered in Slovenia en route to Italy last month. Significant numbers of Red-thorated pipit, White wagtail and Meadow pipit were found amongst a haul of over a thousand individuals birds.View the full article
  2. The Alliance for Zero Extinction has mapped 1,483 highly threatened species that are only found at a single site. This major new assessment highlights the urgent need for better protection of these irreplaceable locations.View the full article
  3. A new study used tracking data from 52 seabirds over 20 years to help scientists understand how to best protect them.View the full article
  4. We interview the leader of the Albatross Task Force in Argentina, Leandro Tamini, who has won the Marsh Award for Marine Conservation Leadership, which recognises people or organisations having a profound impact on marine conservation.View the full article
  5. This month, wetlands containing one of Singapore’s last remaining mangroves have secured protection after years of concerted advocacy. This move will benefit globally threatened birds such as the Chinese Egret and Straw-headed Bulbul.View the full article
  6. Community nature reserves are not only improving habitats for rare grassland birds, but also proving a vital lifeline for cattle farmers, literally saving lives during drought. But how has the Liben Lark responded to this initiative?View the full article
  7. 40 years ago, we set out to identify the most important sites for birds in Europe. This idea has since spread across the world, informing conservation decisions and setting the model for wider initiatives to follow suit. We recount our top successes in that time.View the full article
  8. Giant invasive “mega-mice” on Gough Island are set to be eradicated in one of the most ambitious projects of its kind, which will save two million seabird eggs and chicks a year from being eaten in the nest.View the full article
  9. Following the publication of a benchmark new study in one of biology’s most prestigious journals, we take a closer look at the science of ‘rewilding’ – the ecological restoration movement putting hope at the heart of conservation.View the full article
  10. This year, we held the first ever global summit for flyways conservation, uniting a panoply of countries and sectors. On World Migratory Bird Day, we’re sharing some of the most important decisions we made in order to ensure the miracle of migration will be there for future generations to enjoy.View the full article
  11. Wind energy has an incredibly green image. Yet placed in the wrong locations, wind turbines can harm birds and bats. The solution: strong science and technology that helps to avoid this unnecessary damageView the full article
  12. Between September 26th-28th, over 200 members of the BirdLife family flocked to Wallonia, Belgium for the 2018 BirdLife General Partnership Meeting. These landmark meetings are where we gather to elect our Government and review our conservation strategy for the years to come.View the full article
  13. Not all countries have the resources to conduct big scientific surveys. A pioneering new project across three African countries proves that local volunteers are an effective way to monitor the health of birds and the habitats they live in.View the full article
  14. With the conclusion of one of BirdLife’s most ambitious projects to date, ‘LIFE EuroSAP: Coordinated Efforts for International Species Recovery’, we reflect back on a mammoth three-year collaboration to change the fate of 16 threatened bird species.View the full article
  15. BirdLife International

    State of Africa’s Birds

    Africa is a continent that is expanding fast, both population-wise, and in terms of wealth and technology. At first glance, this latest review of the continent’s birds presents a pessimistic reflection of this expansion. View the full article
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