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Ellen Paul

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  1. Ellen Paul

    MBTA permits and the shutdown

    This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. As the shutdown drags on, some of you may be concerned about the fact that your MBTA permits are expiring. You need not worry because 50 CFR 13.22 expressly authorizes continuation of the permitted activity but ONLY IF: § 13.22 Renewal of permits. (a) Application for renewal. Applicants for renewal of a permit must submit a written application at least 30 days prior to the expiration date of the permit. Applicants must certify in the form required by § 13.12(a)(5) that all statements and information in the original application remain current and correct, unless previously changed or corrected. If such information is no longer current or correct, the applicant must provide corrected information. (b) Renewal criteria. The Service shall issue a renewal of a permit if the applicant meets the criteria for issuance in § 13.21(b) and is not disqualified under § 13.21(c). (c) Continuation of permitted activity. Any person holding a valid, renewable permit may continue the activities authorized by the expired permit until the Service acts on the application for renewal if all of the following conditions are met: (1) The permit is currently in force and not suspended or revoked; (2) The person has complied with this section; and (3) The permit is not a CITES document that was issued under part 23 of this subchapter (because the CITES document is void upon expiration). Therefore, if you wish to take advantage of this provision, go ahead and file your application to renew. No one will be there to process it (unless DOI accedes to the request made by the Ornithological Council to allow the MBTA permit staff to return to work) but you will have satisfied the requirements of this provision. We encourage you to send the renewal application by FedEx so you will have proof of the date sent. Note that if you fail to comply with these conditions, your renewal application could be denied. If your animal use protocol is up for renewal, you may want to provide this information to your IACUC. The Ornithological Council will post the information on the IACUC Administrator's listserve.
  2. The Director for Migratory Bird Conservation Policy is charged with leading Audubon’s efforts to develop and advocate for policy solutions that conserve migratory birds with a focus on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and migratory bird conservation funding programs. Reporting to the Senior Vice President for Conservation Policy, they are a member of the National Audubon Society’s policy leadership team and will closely collaborate with state and national leadership across the country. Within their area of responsibility, the Policy Director is responsible for monitoring, coordinating, developing, and negotiating policy positions; supporting state and national policy and program staff; and leading Audubon’s engagement with outside stakeholders including state and federal decision makers, coalition partners, and a wide range of affected interests from agriculture to the energy industry. This work includes proactively communicating issues and positions through earned and social media, and helping attract resources to support this important work. Areas of Responsibility Develop and advance policy priorities to defend and achieve policy solutions under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act as well as other funding and other opportunities to advance migratory bird conservation in collaboration with the Senior Vice President for Conservation Policy, the Chief Conservation Officer and other Audubon leaders as appropriate. Support the implementation of the Atlantic Flyway Shorebird Implementation plan and the Pacific Shorebird Management Plan by developing shared policy agendas in concert with partner organizations and help advance those agendas. Oversee planning and implementation of key policy campaigns working with communications, campaign, program and policy staff at all levels of the organization. Responsible for driving goals and strategy, framing policy positions, staying abreast of legislative or administrative developments, and drafting supporting materials such as briefing papers, talking points and comment submissions. Negotiate policy outcomes with administrative or legislative decision makers as well as important conservation agreements with industry partners. Represent Audubon within coalitions that advance assigned policy priorities. Develop and maintain productive relationships with key elected and agency officials and staff. Manage consultants retained for lobbying, policy work, or other technical expertise. Coordinate and support any litigation on policy priorities within the Policy Director’s portfolio. Provide real time content in support of Audubon policy objectives for web and social media platforms; be active in the communication and dissemination of Audubon objectives and successes in the policy arena. Serve as a visible ambassador for Audubon, engaging key stakeholders including government officials, major funders, business leaders and the media to advance conservation efforts. Other duties as assigned. Educational Background Post-secondary degree in law, environmental policy, or related field required. Skills/Experience 7-10 years’ progressive professional experience, to include 5+ years working on policy and government relations related to wildlife conservation in business, government or the non-profit arena. An equivalent combination of education and experience will also be considered. Demonstrated expertise with wildlife and environmental laws, including the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Experience with other wildlife and environmental laws and policy, including federal land management authorities and compensatory mitigation policy, is preferred. Successful track record working in, federal, state, and local governmental processes especially with state and federal wildlife agencies and congressional committees with jurisdiction over these issues. Experience working to advance grassroots issue-based advocacy campaigns is preferred. Strong understanding of current policy trends in wildlife, environmental protection, and land conservation, and experience applying this knowledge to policy advocacy and implementation strongly preferred. A self-starter who is able to prioritize multiple simultaneous projects and complete work with minimal supervision while meeting deadlines. Technically savvy, including proficiency with Microsoft Office applications. Excellent verbal and written communication skills, with the ability synthesize and interpret technical information for various audiences, including the grassroots network, decision makers and the news media. Superior interpersonal skills – a leader that is seen as effective organizational ambassador in order to cultivate relationships with partners, government officials, donors, and the public. Willingness and ability to travel regularly across the state and elsewhere as needed, some weekends and evenings required. Knowledge of and deep interest in conservation and the mission of the National Audubon Society. How to Apply https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/3732/director%2c-migratory-bird-c...
  3. Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, the oldest and largest member-supported raptor conservation organization in the world, has selected acclaimed raptor conservationist Dr. Laurie Goodrich as its next Sarkis Acopian Director of Conservation Science. The decision follows an extensive international search to replace Dr. Keith Bildstein, who retired last year. “Laurie is exceptionally qualified and her skill set is multi-dimensional and cuts across our organization. She has the ability to resonate with supporters and translate complex conservation issues into workable solutions,” says President Sean Grace. “The staff, board and volunteers are proud to have her lead the Sanctuary’s world-class scientific research and training programs,” he adds. Goodrich has worked in virtually every aspect of conservation at Hawk Mountain, from overseeing its long-term migration counts, to directing its education program and developing the first education plan, to conducting scientific research and publishing more than 50 peer-reviewed papers. She helped to raise and steward more than $1 million in grants or gifts for conservation science and education, including a transformational gift of $500,000 to expand raptor conservation education, and more than $2 million for land conservation. Now, she looks forward to expanding on that work. “Hawk Mountain has a unique opportunity to collaborate with talented scientists around the world, expand our education programs to encourage raptor conservation globally, and build even stronger partnerships with our friends in the field,” Goodrich says. “This work will benefit raptors, and when raptors do well, so do the people who enjoy watching them,” she adds. Goodrich is considered exceptional in her ability to bring people together to foster successful long-term conservation. Locally, she launched the collaborative Pennsylvania Farmland Raptor and The Broad-winged Hawk research projects, and globally, she co-founded the now world-famous, million-raptor conservation site at the River of Raptors in Veracruz, Mexico. Working with colleagues at the Hawk Migration Association of North America, HawkWatch International, and Bird Studies Canada, she helped develop the award-winning Raptor Population Index Project, and contributed heavily to The State of North America’s Birds of Prey, the first comprehensive analysis of raptor populations across the continent. Combined, she has coordinated the work of dozens of volunteers, trainees, and graduate students, and interacted with countless citizen scientists. Goodrich joined the Sanctuary in 1984 as the first full-time research biologist and over the next decade launched long-term research on the effects of forest fragmentation on songbirds and co-published Hawk Mountain’s first scientific paper on raptor migration trends. In 1996, she planned and supervised the Sanctuary’s baseline biological inventory and in 2000 co-wrote the first Hawk Mountain Land Management Plan, a document that continues to guide land use and protection work. From 2010 through 2014, she served as interim Director of Education, overseeing Hawk Mountain Raptor Challenge initiative to successful completion as well as on- and off-site programming. She co-wrote the first-ever Hawk Mountain Education Plan, oversaw the first Raptor Educators Peer Workshop, and supervised the design and installation of exhibits in the newly renovated and expanded Irma Broun-Kahn Education Building. As director for all Sanctuary stewardship, Goodrich spearheaded big wins for land conservation, including a recent grant of more than $850,000 to protect 77 acres of prime farmland in the shadow of Hawk Mountain. Last year, she led a three-year project to protect the majority of the Sanctuary’s landholdings through conservation easement, work that ultimately will result in an estimated $1 million in carbon credit revenues over the next five years. With an MS in Ecology from Rutgers University, Goodrich earned a Ph.D. in Ecology from the Pennsylvania State University on the stopover behavior and ecology of autumn-migrating raptors. Her independent research helped identify the Kittatinny Ridge as a critical resource to avian migrants. She serves on the board of the Hawk Migration Association of North America and is a past board member of the Raptor Research Foundation and the Wilson Ornithological Society. She serves on the Pennsylvania Ornithological Technical Committee, is scientific advisor for the Pronatura Veracruz River of Raptors, and is an elected member of the American Ornithological Union. A volunteer for more than 15 years with Big Brothers and Big Sisters, she has served two townships in various planning boards or conservation committees. Laurie has received numerous awards for professional excellence, including from the Hawk Migration Association of North America, the Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology, Delaware Valley Ornithological Club, the Pennsylvania State University, and Pronatura Veracruz. “Today, threats to raptors are more complicated than when Rosalie Edge purchased the Sanctuary to stop the shooting of migrating hawks,” Goodrich says. “I believe Hawk Mountain conservation science working with education can significantly advance global raptor conservation,” she adds.
  4. The reception of proposal for workshops, round-tables and symposiums for the XI Neotropical Ornithology Conference are open from January 7th to February 28th. Information about the requirements can be found here: http://congresoavesneotropicales.com/participacion/ The conference will be conducted in San José Costa Rica from July 28th to August 2nd, 2019. Hola a todos, La recepción de propuestas para talleres, mesas redondas y simposios para el XI Congreso de Ornitología Neotropical estan abiertas del 7 de enero al 28 de febrero. La información sobre los requisitos de como enviar sus propuestas se encuentra en este link: http://congresoavesneotropicales.com/participacion/ El congreso se relazará del 28 de Julio al 2 de agosto de 2019 en San José, Costa Rica. Los esperamos Luis Luis Sandoval, Ph.D. Escuela de Biología Universidad de Costa Rica Costa Rica
  5. Ellen Paul

    Fred Zwickel, 1926-2018

    Fred C. Zwickel was born in Seattle, Washington, in 1926. He completed B.Sc. (1950) and M.Sc. (1958) programs in Wildlife Biology at Washington State University and began studies of Blue Grouse in 1953, while employed as a wildlife biologist with the State of Washington Department of Game (1950–1961). A return to school in 1961 brought him a Ph.D. in Zoology at the University of British Columbia (1965), followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the Nature Conservancy (Unit of Grouse and Moorland Ecology) in Scotland, one year in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University, and 18 years in the Department of Zoology at the University of Alberta. Population studies of Blue Grouse have been the main focus of his research since 1953, principally in coastal British Columbia (since 1961). A monograph on the biology and natural history of Blue Grouse, in collaboration with J. F. Bendell, was released in 2004. In 2013, the British Columbia Field Ornithologists awarded Dr. Zwickel the Steve Cannings Award for his decades of work on the Blue Grouse complex
  6. Ellen Paul

    Doug James, 1925 - 2018

    Doug James, a fellow of the American Ornithological Society and infamous organizer of the annual All-out Ostrich Uproar fun run held at that society's meetings, passed away at his Arkansas home on 17 December 2018. In 2014, he was the recipient of the William and Nancy Klamm Service Award Committee. This award honors the memory of extensive service and commitment to the society shown by Bill and Nancy Klamm, who generously supported the society with both their time and a substantial financial bequest. From the obituary published in the Arkansas Democrat Gazette: Doug received a Bachelor of Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1946, a Masters degree in 1947, and a PhD at the University Illinois, Champaign-Urbana in 1957. His graduate work focused on the ecology of roosting blackbirds under direction of avian ecologist Dr. S.C. Kendeigh. Doug began teaching at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville in 1953 and was named University Professor of the Biological Sciences in 2004. At his retirement in 2016, he had become the longest serving professor in University of Arkansas history. During his career he taught as a Fulbright Scholar in Ghana (1970-1971), Nepal (1981-1982), and Belize (1988-1989). During his 64 years associated with the University of Arkansas, Doug taught courses including general biology, vertebrate biology, ornithology, mammalogy, animal behavior, and ecology. An authority in ornithology, he was the senior author on Arkansas Birds (UA Press, 1986). Doug mentored eighty-three graduate students: 53 master's and 30 doctoral students. He was author and/or coauthor of 114 scientific publications. Drafted during the Korean War, Doug served as a Research Associate in the US Army (1954-1956) in the Army Chemical Corps at Pine Bluff Arsenal (Arkansas), where he also conducted numerous bird research projects. Doug helped found the Arkansas Audubon Society in 1955 and the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust in 1972. Doug's students started the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society in 1978. He served on the board of the Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association and endorsed protection of the forests on Kessler Mountain where he lived for many years. His involvement with the Ozark Society and protection of the Buffalo National River is recounted in the Battle for the Buffalo River, by Neil Compton. He also served as a general ecologist in the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research for the US Atomic Energy Commission (1974-1976). Doug served as president of the Wilson Ornithological Society in 1977-1979. Doug's favorite bird family was the starlings: Sturnidae. According to Doug, "Starlings are so beautiful, there are so many species, they are so iridescent: they rival hummingbirds in colors." Doug loved marathon running, ballet, opera, hockey, art, all sports, and watched Babe Ruth play at Tiger stadium in Detroit. A lovely essay about Doug was written by his colleagues, Ragupathy Kannan (University of Arkansas at Fort Smith) and Kimberly G. Smith (University of Arkansas, Fayetteville).
  7. Spend your summer doing field work in the beautiful Sierra Nevada Mountains! We are looking for an experienced crew leader to supervise five volunteer field technicians conducting surveys for Northern Goshawks. PROJECT DATES (tentative): June 5, 2019 – Aug 15, 2019 RESPONSIBILITIES: Primary duties will involve training and supervising a survey crew conducting occupancy and reproduction surveys for Northern Goshawks on National Forest land. Much of the survey work will be off trail and will require frequent long drives and occasional car camping. Closely coordinating all project activities with the Forest Service will also be required. Work will be physically demanding, involving off-trail hiking and exposure to hot weather. REQUIREMENTS: Previous raptor survey experience is required; previous supervisory experience is strongly preferred. Other requirements include a sense of humor, a love of adventure, and a desire to teach volunteers about Northern Goshawks and the Sierra Nevada. Survey work will occur primarily in the vicinity of Quincy, CA. A willingness to face the rigors of fieldwork with good humor is important. These rigors include physically demanding work, hot and dry weather, mosquitoes, occasional contact with bears, and housing that may be rustic and/or somewhat crowded. A personal vehicle is highly desirable but not strictly required. SCHEDULE: Typically 7 days on and 3 off. EQUIPMENT: The crew leader is expected to provide her/his own binoculars, hiking boots and camping gear for car camping (tent, sleeping bag, raingear, etc.). COMPENSATION: This is an IBP seasonal staff position paying $3,000/month (before payroll taxes) but includes no fringe benefits. Free shared housing will also be provided. TO APPLY: Please email a resume, cover letter, and the names, phone numbers and email addresses of three references to Mandy Holmgren, Biologist, at: mholmgren AT birdpop DOT org.
  8. Spend your summer doing field work in the beautiful Sierra Nevada Mountains! We are looking for an experienced crew leader to supervise three volunteer field technicians conducting surveys for California Spotted Owls. PROJECT DATES (tentative): April 15, 2019 – Aug 15, 2019 RESPONSIBILITIES: Primary duties will involve training and supervising a survey crew conducting occupancy and reproduction surveys for California Spotted Owls on National Forest land. Much of the survey work will be at night and will require frequent long drives and occasional car camping. Closely coordinating all project activities with the Forest Service will also be required. Work will be moderately physically demanding, involving off-trail hiking and exposure to cold weather in the early season. REQUIREMENTS: Previous Spotted Owl survey experience is required; previous supervisory experience is strongly preferred. Other requirements include a sense of humor, a love of adventure, and a desire to teach volunteers about Spotted Owls and the Sierra Nevada. Survey work will occur primarily in the vicinity of Quincy, CA. A willingness to face the rigors of fieldwork with good humor is important. These rigors include physically demanding work, adapting to a largely nocturnal schedule, wet and cold weather, hot and dry weather, mosquitoes, occasional contact with bears, and housing that may be rustic and/or somewhat crowded. A personal vehicle is highly desirable but not strictly required. SCHEDULE: Typically 7 days on and 3 off. EQUIPMENT: The crew leader is expected to provide her/his own binoculars, hiking boots and camping gear for car camping (tent, sleeping bag, raingear, etc.). COMPENSATION: This is an IBP seasonal staff position paying $3,000/month (before payroll taxes) but includes no fringe benefits. Free shared housing will also be provided. TO APPLY: Please email a resume, cover letter, and the names, phone numbers and email addresses of three references to Mandy Holmgren, Biologist, at: mholmgren AT birdpop DOT org.
  9. We have up to 4 openings for experienced point counters during spring/summer 2019 on our Sierra Nevada Black-backed Woodpecker Monitoring project. PROJECT DATES (tentative): Mid May – Mid July (tentative). TRAINING: The field season will begin with a training session in project protocols for conducting multi-species point counts, using playback-surveys to detect Black-backed Woodpeckers, and conducting habitat assessments. Surveyors are required to already be able to identify Sierra birds by sight and sound; applicants with previous point count experience will be strongly preferred. RESPONSIBILITIES: Working in a team of two, biologists will visit and survey recently burned forest sites on Forest Service lands throughout the Sierra Nevada. On a typical day, surveyors will wake up before dawn and spend the morning conducting woodpecker surveys, multi-species point counts, and rapid vegetation surveys at each survey site. The afternoon will then typically be spent traveling to, and scoping out, the next day’s surveys sites. Work will be physically demanding, sometimes involving several-mile hikes into survey sites and the occasional short (1-4 day) backpacking trips to access survey sites far from roads. Off-trail travel will be required at many survey sites. The typical work schedule will be 7-days on followed by 3-days off. REQUIREMENTS: We are looking for candidates with prior birding experience and familiarity with the songs and calls of western montane birds. Prior point count experience is mandatory. Other requirements include a sense of humor, a love of adventure, a desire to learn more about Black-backed Woodpecker natural history and fire ecology, and an appreciation for recently burned montane landscapes. Crew members will be camping most nights in front-country campgrounds or in the backcountry on the occasional back-country trip. Survey work will be distributed across the entire Sierra Nevada and southern Cascades in California, requiring substantial car travel and willingness to lead a nomadic life for a few months. A willingness to face the rigors of fieldwork with good humor is important. These rigors include (but are not limited to!) physically demanding work, long work days that may begin well before dawn, wet, cold weather, mosquitos, occasional contact with bears, and less-than-glamorous housing. Successful candidates must be in excellent physical condition and must be comfortable with off-trail hiking and orienteering (training provided). EQUIPMENT: Biologists are expected to provide their own binoculars and camping/backpacking gear, including hiking boots, tent, sleeping bag, raingear, etc. A personal automobile is a required for 1 member of each two-person team. COMPENSATION: Surveyors will be considered seasonal IBP staff, and will receive payment of $2,400 per month (before payroll taxes) and project-related travel mileage reimbursement ($0.37/mile), but no fringe benefits. In addition, campground fees will be reimbursed. MORE INFORMATION: For more information about this IBP program, please see our Black-backed Woodpecker Webpage. TO APPLY: Please email a resume, cover letter, and the names, phone numbers and email addresses of two references to Bob Wilkerson, Biologist at: bwilkerson AT birdpop DOT org.
  10. We have two openings during spring/summer 2019 for a point count project at Fort AP Hill, Virginia. PROJECT DATES: Approximately late April – early June (exact start date TBD) RESPONSIBILITIES: The field season will begin with a short training session in visual and acoustic bird ID skills, point count techniques, and safety. On a typical day, working in a team of two, biologists will wake up before dawn drive and hike to a point count transect starting point, after which each biologist will conduct the point count in opposite directions of the same transect, meeting again at the starting point or the field vehicle. Point counts will generally conclude by about 11:00 am each day. Additional work will be spent entering data, planning for the next day’s work, etc. Work will be physically demanding, sometimes involving hiking several miles per day, and work in areas with ticks, mosquitoes, bears and other field hazards. Candidates must be in very good physical condition, and must be comfortable with off-trail hiking and orienteering (training provided). REQUIRED SKILLS and EXPERIENCE: Candidates MUST have previous experience conducting avian point counts, and be able to identify Southeastern U.S. birds by sight and (especially) by call and song. COMPENSATION: These positions are considered independent contractors, not IBP staff. Biologists will receive payment of $2,400 per month, but no fringe benefits. Free housing provided. TO APPLY: Submit a cover letter, resume, and contact information for 3 references (all as a single attachment) to: Mandy Holmgren The Institute for Bird Populations Email: mholmgren@birdpop.org Please put Fort AP Hill Point Count Position in the subject line
  11. Ellen Paul

    MAPS FIELD BIOLOGIST

    We have one opening during spring/summer 2019 for a MAPS Biologist in Mariposa County, CA PROJECT DATES: Approximately mid-June to early August (exact start date TBD) RESPONSIBILITIES: The biologist will run a series of 5-6 Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) banding stations along the Merced River in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, near Yosemite National Park. The biologist will work with and supervise a volunteer field technician. Housing will be provided in the town of Mariposa free of charge. Work schedule is somewhat flexible based on weather and other logistics, but workers will be expected to spend a minimum of 6 of every 10 days in the field. Work consists of rising well before dawn to reach the banding stations, operating them until approximately noon, and then planning for the next day’s work. Additional work in the afternoon will include data entry or other logistics related to the field work. REQUIRED SKILLS and EXPERIENCE: Successful applicants MUST have previous experience with the MAPS protocol, be proficient at Western U.S. bird identification, and MUST have advanced skills in mist-netting, bird banding, and ageing and sexing of birds in the hand. Applicants will be expected to use Peter Pyle’s Identification Guide to North American Birds, Part I, to identify plumages and molts of landbirds. Attention to detail, good physical condition, a tolerance of long days that begin before dawn, and the ability to endure sometimes difficult field conditions are required. In addition, most of the sites require a short river crossing in an inflatable kayak to ferry supplies and reach the site. Kayaking or other boating skills and knowledge of safe operation of river craft are highly desired. COMPENSATION: The Biologist will be considered seasonal IBP staff, and will receive payment of $2,400 per month (before payroll taxes) and project-related travel mileage reimbursement ($0.37/mile) if their own vehicle is utilized for project work, but no fringe benefits. Free housing will be provided. TO APPLY: Submit a cover letter, resume, and contact information for 3 references (all as a single attachment) to: Lauren Helton The Institute for Bird Populations Phone: (415) 663-1436 Email: lhelton@birdpop.org Please put Merced River MAPS Biologist in the subject line.
  12. We have two openings during spring/summer 2019 for a point count project at Fort Bragg, NC PROJECT DATES: Approximately late April – early June (exact start date TBD) RESPONSIBILITIES: On a typical day, working in a team of two, biologists will wake up before dawn drive and hike to a point count transect starting point. Over the course of the next several hours, biologists will hike to points along a transect, recording all birds seen and heard. Point counts will generally conclude by about 11:00 am each day. Additional work will be spent entering data, planning for the next day’s work, etc. The work is physically demanding, sometimes involving hiking several miles per day, in areas with ticks, mosquitoes, bears, rattlesnakes, and other field hazards. Candidates must be in very good physical condition, and must be comfortable with off-trail hiking and orienteering. Applicants must provide their own transportation to the work site at Fort AP Hill, Virginia, but will be provided with a work vehicle once there. Lodging will be provided free of charge. REQUIRED SKILLS and EXPERIENCE: Candidates MUST have previous experience conducting avian point counts, and be able to identify Southeastern U.S. birds by sight and (especially) by call and song. COMPENSATION: $2,400 per month plus free housing, but no fringe benefits. TO APPLY: Submit a cover letter, resume, and contact information for 3 references (all as a single attachment) to: Lauren Helton The Institute for Bird Populations Phone: (415) 663-1436 Email: lhelton@birdpop.org Please put Fort Bragg Point Count Position in the subject line.
  13. By law, your MBTA permits fees are returned to the Division of Migratory Bird Management rather than going to the general treasury. Thus, the permit program has a separate source of revenue independent of federal appropriations. The Ornithological Council will communicate with DOI officials and members of Congress to ask that the permits program be allowed to operate during the shutdown. The IC made the same request during the most recent prior shutdown but fortunately, that shutdown ended only a few days later. Unfirtunately, this request will not apply to the Bird Banding Lab, which is not free-funded.
  14. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. COMMENTS ON THE DRAFT REPORT, DESCRIBED BELOW, ARE SOUGHT. COMMENTS MUST BE SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY BY 2 FEB 2019. The draft report on Reducing Administrative Burden for Researchers: Animal Care and Use in Research by the 21st Century Cures Act Working Group is officially available: https://olaw.nih.gov/sites/default/files/21CCA_draft_report.pdf. The 2016 21st Century Cures Act (21CCA) directed the National Institutes of Health (NIH), in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to review applicable regulations and policies for the care and use of laboratory animals and to make revisions, as appropriate, to reduce administrative burden on investigators while maintaining the integrity and credibility of research findings and protection of research animals. The Act instructs NIH to: (1) seek the input of experts, if appropriate; (2) identify ways to ensure applicable regulations and policies are not inconsistent, overlapping, or unnecessarily duplicative; (3) take steps to eliminate or reduce identified inconsistencies, overlap, or duplication among such regulations and policies; and (4) take other actions, as appropriate, to improve the coordination of regulations and policies with respect to research with laboratory animals. NIH, USDA, and FDA convened a Working Group of federal subject matter experts that carried out a review and prepared a report of its recommendations as directed in the 21CCA. To identify inconsistent, overlapping, and unnecessarily duplicative regulations and policies, the Working Group reviewed published reports, communications, and surveys highlighting the regulations and policies that contribute to researchers’ administrative burden (Section 1, page 2); conducted listening sessions and met with organizations and stakeholders (Section 2, page 3); and issued a Request for Information (RFI) and analyzed stakeholder responses (Section 3, page 4). Appendix 1. Analysis of Key Findings from the Reports, Communications, and Surveys presents a condensed description of the key findings from the eight reports, communications, and surveys; the Working Group’s analysis; and proposed actions. Appendix 2. Analysis of Responses to the Request for Information presents a summary of the public responses received for the eleven RFI topics, the Working Group’s analysis, and proposed actions. The Working Group identified the following areas in which there is opportunity to reduce administrative burden: semiannual inspections by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUC), animal activities (protocol) review, and institutional reporting. Recommended steps to reduce duplicative regulations and policies are provided on page 5. The Working Group identified the following areas in which there is opportunity to improve coordination: guidance on federal standards, agency harmonization, and training and resources.
  15. This news and analysis are provided by the Ornithological Council, a consortium supported by 11 ornithological societies. Join or renew your membership in your ornithological society if you value the services these societies provide to you, including OrnithologyExchange and the Ornithological Council. FULL REPORT "During the first two years of the Trump administration, Secretary Ryan Zinke and his political team have unleashed constant—and ongoing—attacks on science, from sidelining the work of the agency's own scientists to systematically refusing to acknowledge or act on climate change. These actions have far-reaching and serious implications for our health, the environment, and the future of our public lands. Science under Siege at the Department of the Interior reviews nearly two years of actions by the DOI under Secretary Zinke and identifies the most damaging and egregious examples of anti-science policies and practices. Sytematically suppressing science Secretary Zinke’s DOI has stifled politically inconvenient research, undermined science-based rules and regulations, and consistently put the interests of coal, gas, and oil companies ahead of public health. Some of the more glaring examples include: Cancelling a scientific study evaluating the health effects of mountaintop-removal coal mining Stopping research designed to improve safety at offshore drilling sites Mandating that scientific grants be reviewed by a political appointee with no science background' You are here Center for Science and Democracy Science Under Siege at the Department of the Interior (2018) Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and his political appointees have overseen relentless attacks on science and put our nation's parks, health, and wildlife at risk. Download Full report During the first two years of the Trump administration, Secretary Ryan Zinke and his political team have unleashed constant—and ongoing—attacks on science, from sidelining the work of the agency's own scientists to systematically refusing to acknowledge or act on climate change. These actions have far-reaching and serious implications for our health, the environment, and the future of our public lands. Science under Siege at the Department of the Interior reviews nearly two years of actions by the DOI under Secretary Zinke and identifies the most damaging and egregious examples of anti-science policies and practices. Sytematically suppressing science Secretary Zinke’s DOI has stifled politically inconvenient research, undermined science-based rules and regulations, and consistently put the interests of coal, gas, and oil companies ahead of public health. Some of the more glaring examples include: Cancelling a scientific study evaluating the health effects of mountaintop-removal coal mining Stopping research designed to improve safety at offshore drilling sites Mandating that scientific grants be reviewed by a political appointee with no science background Photo: Kate Wellington/Creative Commons (Flickr) Failing to acknowledge or act on climate change Secretary Zinke has systematically ignored, sidelined, and blocked efforts to research, communicate about, or respond to climate change. At the same time, he has actively promoted policies that run counter to what science shows is the most important step the nation must take to address global warming and prevent its most catastrophic impacts: a massive and rapid reduction in our use of fossil fuels. This deliberate sidelining of climate science has taken several forms: Refusing to acknowledge reality by striking climate change from the agency’s strategic vision and rescinding policies that factor climate change into future planning Covering up bad news by delaying and burying reports dealing with climate impacts and censoring established science in press releases Moving backwards by taking actions that are almost certain to increase global warming emissions and fossil fuel extraction on public lands Silencing and intimidating agency scientists and staff Under Secretary Zinke, not only is science a target but so too are the scientists and staff who carry out the department’s crucial work. Many recent policies restrict the ability of DOI scientists and other staffers to fulfill the department’s mission, while other actions contribute to a hostile work environment. These include: Freezing out advice from science advisory committees Restricting DOI scientists from communicating about their work Removing, reassigning, and intimidating scientists and other DOI staff Recommendations The damage from Secretary Zinke’s policies is mounting. They have caused harm to public lands, public health and safety, and the country’s wildlife and habitats. Left unchecked, the effects will take decades to repair, and yet the consequences of climate change are already upon us. We have no time to lose. Congress, particularly the House Committee on Natural Resources and the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, should increase congressional oversight of the DOI and thoroughly investigate all alleged violations of scientific integrity and all reports of suppressed or censored scientific studies. Congress and others should also demand that the DOI's efforts to protect America’s public lands and wildlife include and factor in climate change, both now and in the future. Scientists and science supporters should bring attention to DOI activities that sideline science and threaten public lands or health. Any scientist—indeed, anyone—can raise their voice and raise awareness when DOI activities threaten public lands or health. Call your representative, visit their local offices, or write a letter to your local newspaper’s editor. UCS has tips and resources to help guide your efforts: www.ucsusa.org/actiontips. Local stakeholders, partners of public lands, and the outdoor industry should engage with the DOI and participate in public comment periods and other DOI rule-making processes, especially ones that affect public lands in your region, state, and community. As regular users of public lands, local partners and stakeholders are uniquely positioned to see any changes occurring on the ground as a result of DOI actions. Share what you see with your community, other local stakeholders, and the media."
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