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  1. Researchers have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the 10-gram weight category -- with the small birds flying around 13,000 kilometers or longer to reach their destination. View the full article
  2. In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse -- the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. During the event, researchers watched radar to observe the behavior of birds and insects. View the full article
  3. A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species. View the full article
  4. Researchers have discovered that daily nest predation of shorebirds has increased threefold over the last 70 years. The data suggest the larger increase in the Arctic relative to the tropics indicates a link to climate change. View the full article
  5. Scientists have thought that the main determinant of maximal longevity in warm-blooded animals -- which varies from as little as 2 to as many as 211 years -- is a species' metabolic rate, which is inversely related to body size. It follows that at 2 years of life, small animals with high metabolic rates are already old, but large animals with low metabolic rates are still young. View the full article
  6. Goffin's cockatoos can tear cardboard into long strips as tools to reach food -- but fail to adjust strip width to fit through narrow openings, according to a new study. View the full article
  7. Researchers are using isotopic analysis to track where elusive hawks were fledged. This technique helps wildlife managers identify critical habitat. View the full article
  8. A new study has shown vultures use their very own social networks to take advantage of thermal updrafts which help them fly vast distances. Researchers examined how the vultures seemed to make risky but efficient choices when it came to their flight patterns by observing other birds in the network. View the full article
  9. The world's smallest flightless bird can be found on Inaccessible Island in the middle of the South Atlantic. Less than 100 years ago, researchers believed that this species of bird once wandered there on land extensions now submerged in water, and therefore named it Atlantisia. The researchers have now shown that the ancestors of the Atlantisia flew to Inaccessible Island from South America about 1.5 million years ago. View the full article
  10. A new study says the colors found in modern birds' eggs did not evolve independently, as previously thought, but evolved instead from dinosaurs. View the full article
  11. If you encountered an elephant bird today, it would be hard to miss. Measuring in at over 10 feet tall, the extinct avian is the largest bird known to science. However, while you looked up in awe, it's likely that the big bird would not be looking back. According to a brain reconstruction, the part of the elephant bird brain that processed vision was tiny, a trait that indicates they were nocturnal and possibly blind. View the full article
  12. New research finds how long humans and other warm-blooded animals live -- and when they reach sexual maturity -- may have more to do with their brain than their body. More specifically, it is not animals with larger bodies or slower metabolic rates that live longer; it is animals with more neurons in the cerebral cortex, whatever the size of the body. View the full article
  13. The Hawaiian Islands are home to a range of unique, endangered bird species. Many waterbirds such as the Hawaiian coot and Hawaiian gallinule have been recovering in recent decades thanks to intensive wetland management, but past declines have left them with reduced genetic diversity. A new study looks at what the birds' genes can tell us about their behavior today and finds that one species' lack of wanderlust may be putting it at greater risk. View the full article
  14. The birds are able to combine individual parts to form a long-distance reaching aid. View the full article
  15. Do animals -- like humans -- divide the world into things that move and things that don't? Are they surprised if an apparently inanimate object jumps to life? Yes -- according to scientists. View the full article
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