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  1. Newly publicized audiovisuals support full species status for one of the dancing birds-of-paradise in New Guinea. This new species, called the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise, is found only in the island's far-western Bird's Head, or Vogelkop, region. View the full article
  2. People in crowded urban areas -- especially poor areas -- see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential 'nuisance' birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows. View the full article
  3. In a unique study, researchers have mapped the origins of migratory birds. They used the results to investigate and discover major differences in the immune systems of sedentary and migratory birds. The researchers conclude that migratory species benefit from leaving tropical areas when it is time to raise their young -- as moving away from diseases in the tropics enables them to survive with a less costly immune system. View the full article
  4. Chickens that grow up in an environment that they perceive as more diverse and manageable, retain an 'optimistic' view of life and cope with stress better than individuals that grow up in more sterile surroundings, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. A team of researchers in Sweden measured how optimism in chickens is affected by stress. View the full article
  5. Finding food to feed baby birds is getting more and more difficult for seabirds due the effects of climate change, according to a new study. View the full article
  6. Private landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land. View the full article
  7. New insights about how songbirds learn to sing provide promising clues about human speech disorders and may lead to new ways of treating them. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  8. A researcher shows that the composition of gut bacteria in birds has a major impact on whether their offspring will survive their first three months. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  9. Blackbirds live longer in cities than in forests. But their telomeres, the repetitive stretches of DNA at the ends of the chromosomes, show that these city birds have a much poorer health status than their rural cousins. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  10. US national parks could become even more important for the conservation of bird species in the face of climate change, according to a new study. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  11. Researchers have taken a key step toward helping wildlife coexist more safely with wind power generation by demonstrating the success of an impact detection system that uses vibration sensors mounted to turbine blades. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  12. A study demonstrates that a bird's song can be altered -- to the syllable -- by activating and deactivating a neuronal pathway responsible for helping the brain determine whether a vocalization is performed correctly. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  13. Animal migration patterns are changing as humans alter the landscape, according to new research. Those changes can affect wildlife interactions with parasites-with potential impacts on public health and on the phenomenon of migration itself. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  14. Researchers found that a majority of raptor deaths are due to trauma and starvation caused by urban expansion and other types of anthropogenic landscape alterations. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
  15. Researchers have found that a tropical species of hummingbird called a black jacobin makes vocal sounds with an unusually high-frequency pitch that falls outside birds' normal hearing range. It's not yet clear whether the hummingbirds can even hear themselves, the researchers say. Read the full article on ScienceDaily
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