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  1. Researchers have carried out research in Southwest Cameroon to assess which proportion of forest would be necessary in order to provide sufficient habitat for rainforest bird species. View the full article
  2. The study is the first to track the timing of 12 geographically distinct breeding populations of tree swallows across the continent. Researchers measured how long birds spent at breeding grounds to raise their young, when they began migration and stopped to refuel, and when they arrived at wintering grounds. Understanding when birds move between breeding and wintering sites, and how different populations move, can help identify the greatest threats to survival. View the full article
  3. The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a new study. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties. View the full article
  4. Researchers have found yet another way in which climate change has been detrimental to migrating birds. As European winters have become warmer, pied flycatchers traveling from Africa to reach breeding grounds in the Netherlands are arriving to find that resident great tits have already claimed nesting sites for the season. As a result, the number of flycatchers killed in great tit nests has risen dramatically. View the full article
  5. Many cat owners worry about their pets wandering the streets, but perceive cats hunting mice and birds to be unavoidable instinct, researchers have found. View the full article
  6. Hummingbirds are fierce fighters, but also efficient feeders with tongues and bills well adapted to extracting every bit of nectar from a flower. Why, then, do the males of some tropical species have bizarre hooks, serrations and hard tips that defeat efficient nectar extraction? Using high-speed video, researchers have documented how these males use their weaponized bills to fight rivals for food and mates, and the trade-offs in choosing fighting prowess over feeding. View the full article
  7. Aviation experts and zoologists have provided new insights into how gulls configure their wing shape -- known as wing morphing -- to stabilize their flight. The findings could be used to design more efficient flying vehicles, including soaring drones for farming or environmental monitoring. View the full article
  8. The mass death of flying foxes in extreme heat in North Queensland last month underscores the importance of wildlife research released today. The new research sheds light on how various species have responded to major climate events. View the full article
  9. The breeding seasons of wild house finches are shifting due to climate change, a Washington State University researcher has found. View the full article
  10. An international team of palaeontologists has discovered that the flying reptiles, pterosaurs, actually had four kinds of feathers, and these are shared with dinosaurs -- pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. View the full article
  11. Researchers witnessed a hummingbird defending its nest from what it interpreted to be a snake, but was actually a caterpillar of the moth Oxytenis modestia. View the full article
  12. A conflict between those working to conserve numbers of hen harriers and those maintaining commercial shooting of red grouse in the English uplands has existed for decades with little sign of progress. Drawing on work conducted in psychology, a new study investigated the underlying values that hunters and conservationists hold that make it so hard to find shared solutions. View the full article
  13. Population data for European mountain birds have been for the first time combined in a recent study, with worrying results: the abundances of mountain-specialist birds has declined by as much as 10% in the 2000s. View the full article
  14. Urban hummingbird feeders are highly prevalent. Researchers want to understand the health implications for birds congregating and sharing food resources at these bird buffets. Data from a new study using RFID technology is one piece of that puzzle. View the full article
  15. New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal -- one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States -- are undergoing speciation in two adjacent deserts. This study, which analyzed genetics and vocal behavior, gives clues about the early steps in bird speciation. View the full article
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