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#3216 AOU Members Response to SFO Vision

Posted by Tony Diamond on 17 March 2012 - 05:21 PM

It is disturbing to this Canadian that the AOU group preparing this document seems to contain no Canadian representation, despite the strong roles played by many Canadians in the AOU over the years. The SCO-SOC is in a different position than many other societies - WOS, COS, AFO etc - in that it is a national society; many members are sensitive to being folded into an "American" super-society. While many of us are also members of AOU, WOS, COS, and AFO, we feel strongly that there is a need and role for a Canadian national organisation.
While sharing Bruce Beehler's concern that a new name should reflect the Western Hemisphere scope of the Society, I doubt that many would support simply using the existing AOU name. That would look like a take-over of the smaller societies by Big Brother, and would cause confusion in future over "which AOU" was meant.
A professional staff is a great idea, for sure, and the clear roles for different new journals would be excellent. How each society consults and involves its membership in these momentous decisions is critical; so far this seems to have taken the form mainly of informing them and assuring them that their officers are looking after their interests. The opportunities for members not attending NAOC seem to be very limited.
Tony Diamond (SCO-SOC President, 1999-2000) (Fellow, AOU)
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#5047 El Hornero now online!

Posted by Ellen Paul on 09 October 2012 - 09:05 AM

Finalmente ya esta está disponible el acceso publico a través de
Internet a la colección completa de El Hornero desde 1917, alojado en
la biblioteca de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales de la
Universidad de Buenos Aires.
http://digital.bl.fc...aciones/hornero
.El portal cuenta con herramientas de busqueda de textos.

En la biblioteca electrónica Scielo, se encuentran los números nuevos,
hasta el ultimo
http://www.scielo.or...&lng=es&nrm=iso

Este trabajo es el resultado de un gran esfuerzo del equipo editorial
de El Hornero encabezado por Javier Lopez de Casenave y Fernando
Milesi, secundado por voluntarios que colaboraron en el scanneo y la
edición. Se pudo hacer además con el apoyo de Aves Argentinas
(www.avesargentinas.org.ar) y especialmente con la ayuda de la AOU a
través de un fondo de apoyo a sociedades ornitológicas
http://www.aou.org/a...itive/index.php. Muchas gracias!


The entire collection of El Hornero (the publication of Aves Argentinas/Asociación Ornitológica del Plata, dating back to 1917) is now online at

http://digital.bl.fcen.uba.ar/gsdl-282/cgi-bin/library.cgi?p=about&c=publicaciones/hornero

The portal has text search tools.

The more recent issues are available at Scielo:
http://www.scielo.org.ar/scielo.php?script=sci_issues&pid=0073-3407&lng=es&nrm=iso

This work is the result of a great effort of the editorial team of El Hornero headed by Javier Lopez and Fernando Casenave Milesi, supported by volunteers who assisted in the scanning. It was supported by Aves Argentinas (www.avesargentinas.org.ar) and an AOU grant to support ornithological societies
http://www.aou.org/awards/competitive/index.php. Thank you very much!
Dr. Adrian S. Di GiacomoDirector Científico / Aves ArgentinasInvestigador (CONICET)Laboratorio de Ecología y Comportamiento AnimalDepartamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución,Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires,Int. Güiraldes y Av. Cantilo s/n,Pabellón II Ciudad Universitaria,C1428EHA Buenos Aires, Argentina
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#4132 AOU Members Response to SFO Vision

Posted by Ricky Dunn on 03 July 2012 - 08:26 AM

One of the difficulties in commenting on SFO proposals is that responses may vary depending on which hat you are wearing. Thus, a COS member might be in favour of SFO (not wanting to give up COS identity unless AOU does the same) – but the same person, speaking as an AOU member, might prefer to preserve AOU, with or without other societies merging into it. Because so many AOU members are also members of other societies, this kind of ambivalence is likely to be widespread.

Sure, there are sound reasons for making some changes – but nearly everything proposed could be done by making changes within AOU, without losing the continuity of over 100 years. Why throw out the baby with the bath-water?

I wonder whether it might be better for AOU to undergo its own renewal process, without the complication of involving other societies. Not an easy task, but probably a lot easier than trying to deal with conflicting agendas across numerous societies.

Finally, I repeat some requests for information that I posted last November, as the crucial info it calls for has not been forthcoming.
  • Justifications for major aspects of the proposal.

- Pros and cons should be presented not only for merging, but for a new business structure, for 4 journals (why 4, vs. 2 or 3?), for a single editor vs. 4 editors and a single managing editor, for a paid administrator (instead of paid editors), etc.

- Depending on the balance of pros/cons for each of the above, there might be alternative models proposed for particular aspects. Presentation of pos/cons and viable alternatives will help ensure that comments are relevant and constructive.

  • Fully costed business plan, with alternatives based on how many societies would be joining in.

- This would have to include clear indication of how 4 journals could be supported under each scenario (number of merging societies), what the cost of membership and subscriptions would have to be, and how many of each would be required (compared to current numbers). How much annual fundraising would be needed? Number and size of endowments being merged would clearly affect these numbers.

- Fund-raising items in the budget must be realistic. Fund-raising is a real profession, and can’t be done part-time by an Executive Director. A good one is expensive, and the office requires a decent budget to do its work. Is there really a viable target market for funders of a scientific society? Supporting ourselves by selling journal and advertising space at very high prices (like medical journals) is not an option for us.


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#3339 New editor, Wilson Journal of Ornithology

Posted by Bob Curry on 01 April 2012 - 01:42 PM

Members of WOS Council are very pleased to announce that they have elected Dr. Mary Bomberger Brown to serve as the next Editor of the Wilson Journal of Ornithology.

Dr. Bomberger Brown will begin service on 1 July 2012, and will take responsibility for content of the journal beginning with volume 125 (2013). She will take over from the capable leadership of current WJO Editor Dr. Clait Braun, who will retain responsibility for volume 124 (2012).

Dr. Bomberger Brown will become the first woman to serve as Editor of any of the primary journals of the major North American ornithological societies, following Dr. Mercedes Foster (former Editor of Ornithological Monographs) as only the second woman to take a lead editorial role within those same societies.


Postscript:

Several people have pointed out that Dr. Cheryl Dykstra has capably served as Editor for many years of the Journal of Raptor Research. We join other ornithologists in celebrating Dr. Dykstra's role as the female editor of this major publication of the Raptor Research Foundation, an organization of international scope that extends beyond North America.

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#3291 Article calling for end to bird banding rebutted by Ornithological Council an...

Posted by Ellen Paul on 26 March 2012 - 02:51 PM

Those of you who are members of The Wildlife Society or who read The Wildlife Professional know that the publication ran an opinion piece in the Winter 2011 issue calling for an end to bird banding.

The Ornithological Council and the North American Banding Council teamed up with expert banders such as Scott and Sue Finnegan and ornithologists Alex Bond and Jeff Stratford to submit a rebuttal. The Wildlife Professional published that rebuttal in its spring 2012 issue.

A copy of the rebuttal is attached to this post.

We hope that none of you will have problems with your IACUCs as a result of this unfortunate article. However, if your IACUC should ask you to address it, or should raise it in discussing your protocol:

a) please let the Ornithological Council know ASAP
b) please provide them with a copy of this rebuttal

They need to know that the author had no banding experience, had no scientific credentials, and it should be evident from the article itself that she relied on popular literature that was not peer-reviewed, that oversimplified or exaggerated the facts - and in one egregious case, actually misstated the science. And that the problems that have been reported regarding specific kinds of markers have been identified by researchers who then went on to correct those problems.

Ellen Paul
Executive Director
Ornithological Council
e-mail: ellen.paul@verizon.net

Attached Files


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#31570 Upcoming grant deadlines August, September, October

Posted by Melanie Colon on 01 August 2016 - 05:36 PM

August
Neotropical Grassland Conservancy Grants http://conservegrass.../#student_grant

(note address says students, but they have other grants as well) 

 

September
CBOT Endangered Species Fund https://www.czs.org/...ed-Species-Fund

Eppley Foundation Grant http://foundationcen...ley/#priorities
Smith Fellowship http://www.conbio.or...program-details
 
October
Conservation Action Now http://www.okczoo.co...-grant-program/
Tinker Foundation Research Grant http://www.tinker.or...research-grants
Sigma Xi Grants in Aid of Research https://www.sigmaxi....s/grants-in-aid
Southern California Research and Learning Grants http://www.mednscience.org/grants
 
Search the database for more opportunities http://ornithologyex...ces/grants.html


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#3147 AOU Members Response to SFO Vision

Posted by Bob Curry on 14 March 2012 - 03:16 PM

In the "Vision" document, the Outreach sub-committee recommends "reevaluation of the need for an Ornithological Council." However, I think that many ornithologists will agree that the many valuable functions and services of the existing Ornithological Council should continue if and when the SFO comes into existence.

I have two suggestions about how to we might do this:

(1) Add another staff position to the SFO management structure that is equivalent in qualifications and duties to the current OC Executive Director position. (This option would be appropriate if the majority of 12 current OC member societies join the SFO, in which case the current representational structure of OC would no longer be tenable.)

or

(2) Include full continued support for OC in its current form, including overall funding from SFO equivalent to (or greater than) the current levels now contributed separately by the various societies that may merge within SFO.

~ Bob Curry, Vice-Chair, Ornithological Council

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#26914 Careers in Ornithology

Posted by JOwen on 19 August 2015 - 09:18 AM

Hi all,

 

Please see attached my notes from the panel discussion. I also included a lot of information that I did not share due to lack of time. Hopefully, you will find some of it a bit more encouraging in its entirety - particularly for those of you interested in pursuing this career path :-). 

 

Best,
Jen Owen

owenj@msu.edu

Attached File  Final Notes on RU_VH Job Information COSAOU2015 meeting.pdf   70.38KB   4 downloads


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#1865 Ohio Natural History Conference -- February 11, Columbus OH

Posted by G.A. Smith on 11 January 2012 - 04:03 PM

Join us in February for the 2012 Ohio Natural History Conference! We are finalizing a very full agenda that will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Ohio Biological Survey and focus on the theme of “Citizen Science.” Dr. David Bonter, Assistant Director of Citizen Science with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology will be the keynote speaker. Other invited speakers this year will discuss birds, beetles, spiders, dragonflies, plants, and more. There is an open call for poster presentations and more information can be found below. Please help spread the word and we hope to see you in Columbus next month!
-----
Ohio Natural History Conference (Celebrating 100 Years of the Ohio Biological Survey)
February 11, 2012
ODOT Hilltop Conference Center, 1980 W. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43223
Theme: “Citizen Science”
Keynote Speaker: Dr. David Bonter, Assistant Director of Citizen Science, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Call for posters and online registration at www.regonline.com/ohionaturalhistoryconference
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#4943 CALL FOR WORKSHOPS & SYMPOSIA - AOU & COOPER 2013 (Chicago) - due 11/...

Posted by Ellen Paul on 27 September 2012 - 11:59 AM

Following up on a terrific meeting in Vancouver, it is time to consider next year in Chicago:
THE 131ST STATED MEETING OF THE AMERICAN ORNITHOLOGISTS' UNION and
THE 83RD ANNUAL MEETING OF THE COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL SOCIETY will be held jointly

on 13-17 AUGUST 2013 in CHICAGO, IL.

We hereby invite proposals for symposia and workshops.

Symposia proposals should include: (1) title of symposium, (2) a 2-5 sentence rationale for the symposium's topic, (3) names, contact information, and presentation topics of presenting speakers and 1-2 alternate speakers, and (4) requested length of symposium (whole day or half day). Before submitting the proposal, organizers are strongly encouraged to contact potential participants and receive at least tentative commitments from them to attend. Symposia are allowed 15 or 30 min for presentations.

Workshop proposals should include (1) title of workshop, (2) a 2-5 sentence rationale for the workshop's topic, (3) names and contact information of the workshop's leaders, (4) short description of target audience, (5) requested length of workshop, and (5) anticipated format and requested resources (e.g., projection equipment, large table). Symposium presenters and organizers are expected to pay registration fees and travel expenses; the AOU cannot provide financial assistance. We encourage symposium and workshop organizers to seek external funds to support participants' expenses.

The deadline for submission of symposium and workshop proposals is Friday, 16 November 2012.

Please submit proposals to PETER LOWTHER (EM: plowther@fieldmuseum.org).
For questions or comments about your OSNA society membership, please contact business@osnabirds.org.
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#4354 Proceedings of the IX Neotropical Ornithological Congress-Peru

Posted by Jack Eitniear on 30 July 2012 - 11:17 AM

Below is the Table of Contents for the Proceedings of the IX NOC-Peru. Hardcopies ($50.00 US) and electronic copies ($20.00) will be available 1 September. Individual papers will also be available upon request from the senior authors at that time. We are printing hard copies as Print-on-Demand only so encourage individuals desiring such to contact me as soon as time allows. Electronic copies will be in a DVD format read only and password protected (Purchasers will be provided a password).
Like music and movies we have a significant financal investment in producing this publication.
Obtaining individual articles via the author is a long standing acceptable practice but electronically distributing complete copies impacts sales and therefore is discouraged.

For additional information contact: Jack Clinton Eitniear, Editor-NOC Proceedings
E-Mail:jce@cstbinc.org

CONTENTS

PLENARY LECTURE
Diversification of the Neotropical Avifauna: disentangling the geographical patterns of persisting ancient taxa and phylogenetic expansions . Jon Fjeldså

SYMPOSIUM PAPERS
A DECADE OF PROGRESS (2001-2010): OVERVIEW OF DISTRIBUTIONAL RECORDS OF BIRDS IN MAINLAND ECUADOR. Alejandro Solano-Ugalde and Juan F. Freile

SEED DISPERSAL BY NEOTROPICAL BIRDS: EMERGING PATTERNS AND UNDERLYING PROCESSES. Jordan Karubian, Luke Browne, Carlos Bosque, Tomas Carlo, Mauro Galetti, Bette A. Loiselle, John G. Blake, Domingo Cabrera, Renata Durães, Fábio M. Labecca, Kimberly M. Holbrook, Richard Holland, Walter Jetz, Franz Kümmeth, Jorge Olivo, Kym Ottewell, Gianni Papadakis0, Gonzalo Rivas1, Silke Steiger, Bryson Voirin, & Martin Wikelski

EFECTOS POTENCIALES DEL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO EN LA DISTRIBUCIÓN DE COLIBRÍES: UN ESTUDIO DE CASO CON ESPECIES DE LOS GÉNEROS. Amazilia Y Cynanthus. Carlos Lara, Teresa Patricia Feria-Arroyo, Jon Dale, Jesús Muñoz, María del Coro Arizmendi, Juan Francisco Ornelas, Raúl Ortíz-Pulido, Claudia Isabel Rodríguez-Flores, Román Díaz-Valenzuela, Vanessa Martínez-García, Anaid Díaz-Palacios, Ruth Partida, Paula L. Enríquez, José Luis Rangel-Salazar & Jorge Schondube

HOW MANY PLANT SPECIES DO HUMMINGBIRDS VISIT?. María del Coro Arizmendi & Claudia Rodríguez-Flores

PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS WITHIN THE GENUS EUPHERUSA INFERRED FROM mtDNA SEQUENCES. Blanca E. Hernández-Baños, Luz E. Zamudio-Beltrán, Jaime García-Moreno & Luis E. Eguiarte

POLLINATION NETWORK OF A HERMIT HUMMINGBIRD COMMUNITY (TROCHILIDAE, PHAETHORNITHINAE) AND THEIR NECTAR RESOURCES IN THE COLOMBIAN AMAZON. Claudia Rodríguez-Flores, F. Gary Stiles & María del Coro Arizmendi

DIFFERENCES IN NECTAR USE POTENTIAL IN A GUILD OF BIRDS: A GUT’S VIEW. Jorge E. Schondube

THE ROLE OF COMPETITION IN STRUCTURING TROPICAL BIRD COMMUNITIES. Jill E. Jankowski, Catherine H. Graham, Juan Luis Parra, Scott K. Robinson, Nathalie Seddon, Janeene M. Touchton, & Joseph A. Tobias

CRITICAL PARAMETERS FOR PSITTACINE CONSERVATION: A SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW. Donald J. Brightsmith & Thomas H. White, Jr.

DOCUMENTANDO ESTRATEGIAS DE MUDA EN AVES NEOTROPICALES: EJEMPLOS DE LA SIERRA NEVADA DE SANTA MARTA, COLOMBIA. Gómez, Camila; Botero-Delgadillo, Esteban; Bayly, Nicholas J.; Moreno, Maria I. y Páez, Carlos Andrés

MOLT-REPRODUCTION OVERLAP IN BIRDS OF CERRADO AND ATLANTIC FOREST, BRAZIL. Piratelli, Augusto

USING MOLT AND PLUMAGE CYCLES TO AGE TROPICAL: UPDATES AND RECENT ADVANCES. Jared D. Wolfe, T. Brandt Ryder, Peter Pyle and E. I. Johnson

PLUMAGE MATURATION IN BROOD PARASITIC SCREAMING AND SHINY COWBIRDS. Cynthia Ursino, Carolina Facchinetti and Juan Carlos Reboreda

PROGRESS IN OUR UNDERSTANDING OF MOLT PATTERNS IN CENTRAL AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN LANDBIRDS. Jared D. Wolfe and Peter Pyle

MUDA DE LAS AVES DEL BOSQUE NUBLADO DE RANCHO GRANDE, AL NORTE DE VENEZUELA. Cristina Sainz-Borgo y Miguel Lentino

TOWARDS AN INTEGRATED HISTORICAL BIOGEOGRAPHY OF THE NEOTROPICAL LOWLAND AVIFAUNA: COMBINING DIVERSIFICATION ANALYSIS AND LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION. Camila C. Ribas, Marcos Maldonado-Coelho, Brian Tilston Smith, Gustavo S. Cabanne, Fernando M. d’Horta, Luciano N. Naka

ECOLOGÍA Y CONSERVACIÓN DE LOS BÚHOS CHILENOS: AVANCES Y DESAFÍOS DE INVESTIGACIÓN. Ricardo A. Figueroa R. & Sergio Alvarado O.

BÚHOS DE ARGENTINA: ESTADO DE CONSERVACIÓN Y PRIORIDADES DE INVESTIGACIÓN. Ana Trejo, María Susana Bó, & Laura Biondi

ESTADO DEL CONOCIMIENTO SOBRE LA ECOLOGÍA Y BIOLOGÍA DE BÚHOS EN BRASIL. José Carlos Motta-Junior & Ana Cláudia Rocha Braga

ESTADO DEL CONOCIMIENTO, DISTRIBUCIÓN Y CONSERVACIÓN DE AVES RAPACES NOCTURNAS EN ECUADOR. Juan F. Freile, Diego F. Castro & Santiago Varela

LOS BÚHOS DE MÉXICO Y CENTROAMÉRICA: NECESIDADES EN INVESTIGACIÓN Y CONSERVACIÓN. Paula L. Enríquez, Knut Eisermann & Heimo Mikkola

THE IMPORTANCE OF NEOTROPICAL SUBOSCINE BIRDS AS STUDY SYSTEMS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. J. A. Tobias, J. D. Brawn, R. T. Brumfield, E. P. Derryberry, A. N. G. Kirschel, N. Seddon

CERULEAN WARBLER TECHNICAL GROUP: COORDINATING INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION. Deanna K. Dawson, T. Bently Wigley, & Patrick D. Keyser

BREEDING SEASON CONCERNS AND RESPONSE TO FOREST MANAGEMENT: CAN FOREST MANAGEMENT PRODUCE MORE BREEDING BIRDS? J.L. Larkin, P.B. Wood, T.J. Boves, J. Sheehan, D.A. Buehler, P.D. Keyser, A.D. Rodewald, T.A. Beachy, M.H. Bakermans, A. Evans, G.A. George, M.E. McDermott, F. L. Newell, K.A. Perkins, M. White, & T.B. Wigley

CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) SPRING MIGRATION STOPOVER IN NORTHERN MIDDLE AMERICA. Melinda J. Welton, David L. Anderson, Gabriel J. Colorado, Paul B. Hamel, & Diego Calderón-F.

ADVANCING OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE NON-BREEDING DISTRIBUTION OF CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) IN THE ANDES. Gabriel J. Colorado, Paul B. Hamel, Amanda D. Rodewald, & David Mehlman

CONSERVATION PLANNING AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) NONBREEDING HABITAT. Benjamin Skolnik, David Wiedenfeld, Randy Dettmers, Constantino Aucca, Lina Daza, Heidy Valle, Francisco Sornoza, Javier Robayo, David Diaz, Jane Fitzgerald, Daniel Lebbin, & Paul B. Hamel

INTEGRATING CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT, SPECIES PROTECTION, AND ECONOMIC VIABILITY INTO SUSTAINABLE LAND USE PRACTICES FOR THE CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) IN THE APPALACHIAN AND NORTHERN ANDES MOUNTAINS. Brian W. Smith, Jorge Botero, Jeff L. Larkin, Amanda D. Rodewald, Petra B. Wood, Patrick N. Angel, & Scott E. Eggerud

CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN FOREST STRUCTURE IN INDIANA. Kamal Islam, Jennifer Wagner, Ryan Dibala, Margaret MacNeil, Kyle Kaminski, & Lila (Prichard) Young

CONSERVANDO EL HÁBITAT INVERNAL DE LA REINITA CERÚLEA (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) EN ECUADOR. Tatiana Santander G., Adrián Soria & Esteban A. Guevara

POPULATION DISTRIBUTION, DENSITY AND HABITAT PREFERENCE OF THE CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) IN THE DELAWARE WATER GAP NATIONAL RECREATION AREA. Shannon Curley, Terry Master, & Gregory George

FORAGING ECOLOGY OF THE CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA) IN ANDEAN AGROFORESTRY ECOSYSTEMS. Jenny M. Muñoz & Gabriel J. Colorado

PASSING THE BATON OF ACTION FROM RESEARCH TO CONSERVATION IMPLEMENTATION FOR CERULEAN WARBLER (SETOPHAGA CERULEA). Paul B. Hamel, David Mehlman, Sebastian Herzog, Kenneth V. Rosenberg, & Jason Jones
INVITED PAPERS

SEASONAL BODY MASS CHANGES IN SIX FOREST PASSERINES OF SOUTHERN CHILE. Steven M. McGehee, Phineas Hamilton, Branden Beatty, & Barry W. Glickman

PREFERRED HABITAT OF BLACK-THROATED BOBWHITE (COLINUS NIGROGULARIS) IN THE MANATEE FOREST RESERVE, BELIZE. Jack C. Eitniear & Celeshia Guy
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#34582 Desert songbirds may face expanding threat of lethal dehydration

Posted by ScienceDaily on 13 February 2017 - 02:12 PM

A new study of songbird dehydration and survival risk during heat waves in the desert Southwest suggests that some birds are at risk of lethal dehydration and mass die-offs when water is scarce, and the risk is expected to increase as climate change advances. Using physiological data, hourly temperature maps and modeling, researchers investigated how rates of evaporative water loss varied in five bird species with varied body mass.

Read the full article on ScienceDaily
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#3138 AOU Members Response to SFO Vision

Posted by Bruce Beehler on 13 March 2012 - 03:16 PM

The Concept is an exciting one, and I wholly approve, but the devil is in the details, of which there are many. At this point I would like to make a few specific comments and suggestions:
1. The name "Society for Ornithology" is problematic. The term "Society" is very 19th century. What is being done is actually uniting a disparate set of institutions, hence the better major term would be "Union." also the proposed name is non-geographic, whereas what is being proposed is very much Western Hemisphere (e.g., "American"). I am guessing there are legal issues pertaining to this, but I would strongly support the use of the existing name "American Ornithologists Union" which, by far, captures the essence of what sort of institution is being created. A union of interests, for the Americas. Society for Ornithology implies a universal or global membership, which is unfair to the European, African, and Asian bird groups out there. This is a bit like American baseball having a championship and calling it the "World Series." Let's not repeat that silly error.

2. The new institution is and will remain a professional society, populated by professional ornithologists. Please let's make sure the Mission does not attempt to replicate the good work being done by bird conservation groups. The work of the new institution should complement that of the American Bird Conservancy, the Bird Conservation Alliance, and the National Audubon Society. And there should be no conflict with the Society for Conservation Biology. All of these bodies do great work and should be supported, not competed with. Great care should be taen to make sure there is no confusion of mission or mission drift.

3. I love the idea of electronic journals, and would hope that the Auk, Condor, and Wilson all agree to be subsumed into the new focused-issue journals. I have zero interest in receiving hard copy journals, and these should be banished as soon as practicable. PDFs should rule. This would reduce the great cost and great waste.

4. The idea of a strong core professional staff is brilliant and should be supported. Though I wonder how well the new institution will do with regard to fund-raising in this very competitive market. AI doubt this will be a strong-point.

Good luck with this valiant effort!

Bruce Beehler
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#26889 R 'unmarked' package version 0.11-0 released

Posted by Chris Merkord on 18 August 2015 - 01:50 PM

An update of the R package 'unmarked', version 0.11, has been released.  
 
This update is NOT YET available on CRAN but can be downloaded here: https://sites.google...me/pre-releases Hoperfully this will be up on CRAN sometime in the next week but there seems to be some technical issues yet to resolve before they let the new version through. The maintainer is working on it.
 
All changes can be found here: https://github.com/r.../commits/master.
 
Summary of new features/bug fixes in Version 0.11-0
  • Andy Royle is the new maintainer 
  • Added Rebecca Hutchinson's penalized likelihood function occuPEN
  • fixed bug in gmultmix to accommodate mixed sampling protocols (NA in count frequency vector is not counted in the constraint that multinomial cell probabilities sum to 1)
  • Changed variable 'ufp' to 'ufc' in ovenbird data and related functions.
  • Removed constraint in pcountOpen that lambdaformula==omegaformula
  • Fixed bug in gdistsamp that caused error when NAs were present in half-normal model
  • Fixed bug in ranef (it was giving an error message for pcountOpen with the new dynamics options (Ricker and Gompertz) and working incorrectly for pcountOpen with immigration)
  • Fixed bug in pcountOpen that occurred when covariates were time varying but not varying among sites

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#26101 Ride sharing to/from the Oklahoma City Airport

Posted by ebridge on 06 July 2015 - 10:17 AM

The 2015 AOU/COS conference will be on the University of Oklahoma campus, which is about 20 miles and 40 minutes from the nearest airport (OKC). To reduce costs, we recommend you seek out other conference attendees arriving to OKC around the same time and share rides in rental cars or taxis. The recommended taxi service is Airport Express. They will transport groups of five to the OU campus for $50 ($38 for the first person and $3 for each additional). There may also be a $1 off coupon posted online soon (check back here or on the meeting website for updates). Reservations are not required for Airport Express if you are leaving from the airport (they always have a bunch of vehicles waiting). However you do need to make arrangements for a ride from OU to the airport (405-681-3311 or 877-688-3311, www.airportexpressokc.com)

 

Anyway, If you are looking to share a ride or find riders to/from the OKC, please post your name, the date and approximate time, whether you are going to or from OKC, and any other pertinent info like whether you will have a rental car. You should probably exchange phone numbers and such afterward by email.

 

 

 


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#25164 New online class: conference poster design

Posted by Melanie Colon on 13 May 2015 - 12:04 PM

SciFund Challenge is very excited to announce a new online class: mastering the art of conference
poster design!

Putting together compelling posters is an essential job skill for academics. At a time when succeeding
in academia is tougher than ever, standing out from the crowd with your conference poster is key.
Unfortunately, very few academics receive any training on how to put together a compelling poster
that will actually make your colleagues pay attention.

That’s where SciFund Challenge comes in with our online class in effective poster design. Over five
weeks, you’ll learn the basics of graphic design and how to use Adobe Illustrator (powerful graphics
software). Even better, you’ll be putting your new design learning to work from the start: at the end of
the class, you’ll have a poster of your research ready to go.

The online class runs from June 7-July 11, 2015. To learn more about the class and to register for it,
please see the following:
http://scifundchalle...-poster-design/

Take care,
Jai Ranganathan


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#19785 10th anniversary of Birds of North America Online

Posted by Chris Merkord on 08 October 2014 - 11:41 AM

Dynamic reference stays current with the latest science.  Ten years have gone by since the Birds of North America went online, transforming an 18-volume, 18,000-page library reference into a dynamic, constantly updated, multimedia-enriched resource accessible to everyone.
 
Researchers, wildlife professionals, conservationists, teachers and bird watchers use BNA Online for definitive life history information and the latest science on more than 700 bird species that breed in the United States (including Hawaii) and Canada.  “One of the key advantages of BNA Online is that it grows and changes as needed,” said editor Alan Poole. “Dozens of species accounts are updated each year. You just can’t stay that up-to-date in print.” 
 
BNA Online was launched by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in September 2004 and has been growing ever since. During the past year, more than 230,000 unique visitors came to the site from 190 countries. There are currently more than 375 libraries, government agencies, and conservation related organizations subscribed.  Accounts are typically written by recognized experts on the species. Aside from information on identification, habitat, distribution, breeding, and behavior, each account includes sound, images, maps, video, and a bibliography for additional reference.
 
New features coming to BNA Online include:

  • Expanded range maps with migratory routes and population distributions,
  • Links to real-time bird data using the eBird online checklist program showing species ranges throughout the year,
  • Improved display of photos and videos. 

Subscribers can sign up for a year or more of access or pay as little as $5.00 to gain access for a month—great for researching school papers or for learning about a new species you’ve just seen. A year’s subscription to BNA Online is $42.00. Cornell Lab members receive a discount.
 
To learn more about BNA Online and to subscribe either as an institution or as an individual, visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/bna.


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#18680 Introducing Journal Map

Posted by Chris Merkord on 07 August 2014 - 08:09 AM

This is a pretty cool idea.  Just for an idea of what it could do for the ornithological community, here is a georeferenced list of sage grouse references:

 

http://www.journalma...map/sage-grouse


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#18163 Shining light on the 100-year mystery of birds sensing spring for offspring

Posted by PhysOrg on 08 July 2014 - 07:50 AM

Professor Takashi Yoshimura and colleagues of the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM) of Nagoya University have finally found the missing piece in how birds sense light by identifying a deep brain photoreceptor in Japanese quails, in which the receptor directly responds to light and controls seasonal breeding activity. Although it has been known for over 100 years that vertebrates apart from mammals detect light deep inside their brains, the true nature of the key photoreceptor has remained to be a mystery up until now. This study led by Professor Yoshimura has revealed that nerve cells existing deep inside the brains of quails, called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting neurons, respond directly to light. His studies also showed that these neurons are involved in detecting the arrival of spring and thus regulates breeding activities in birds. The study published online on July 7, 2014 in Current Biology is expected to contribute to the improvement of production of animals along with the deepening of our understanding on the evolution of eyes and photoreceptors.

Read the full article on PhysOrg
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#1539 Monitoring Marshbirds for Sound Conservation Decisions

Posted by Jennifer Wheeler on 08 December 2011 - 02:48 PM

Dear All,

A few months ago, a document entitled "Monitoring Secretive Marshbirds for
Sound Conservation Decisions at Multiple Scales" was circulated through
this network and others. The paper requested input on five specific
questions from anyone interested in contributing to the development of a
continental marshbird monitoring program built on the needs of marshbird
conservation and management. The paper, along with a spreadsheet
containing responses, is posted at:
http://www.waterbirdconservation.org/marshmonitoring.html.

Thank you to all respondants.

The responses confirmed that the marshbird monitoring community seeks to
address many different management issues, arising from local-scale to
range-wide mandates, ranging from understanding general species status to
guiding regional-scale habitat management to directing very specific
site-actions. Moreover, the community operates under diverse field
conditions and levels of capacity; thus flexibility is a key need when
making recommendations to the community. Moreover, great potential for
partner/joint monitoring efforts exists to address common or overlapping
questions/objectives arising from these many issues. Many partners have
expressed interest in and financial/staffing commitments to implementing
multi-scale secretive marshbird conservation and monitoring for both
harvested and non-game species.
T
he responses were used in the planning of a summit workshop taking place
next week outside Mobile, Alabama. The Steering Committee for this
workshop were the paper authors (Tom Cooper, Chris Dwyer, Katie Koch, Mark
Seamans, Jennifer Wheeler; all USFWS) plus Courtney Conway (USGS), Greg
Shriver (U.Delaware) and Dan Petit (who facilitated the pivotal 1998 and
2006 marshbird monitoring workshops). The Steering Committee felt strongly
about keeping the size of the meeting manageable. The ~30 individuals
invited to the workshop reflect the diversity of stakeholders (from public
and private entities; across North America; concerned with population and
habitat management; etc) but are only a sampling of the large number of
people and entities interested in this topic. Therefore, they have been
asked to think broadly and represent the interests of their broader
partnerships and regions. Moreover, any products of the workshop would be
considered draft, open to comment and improvement by others after the
workshop. In short, there will be opportunities for additional stakeholder
input after the summit.


The workshop will focus on laying out the management issues and the
monitoring objectives based on these issues, in order to identify designs
that address these commonalities and overlaps. The aim is increased
efficiency of effort as well as providing the multi-scale context required
for decision-making (local decisions should be made within a larger
context; larger goals rely on local action). Ultimately, the Steering
Committee envisions production of a "business plan," describing a program
of likely multiple surveys across the content and incorporating statements
on roles and costs/benefits of particular designs. This document, once
completed over the coming months, would be for use in communicating with
implementers as well as the program managers and funders who make
implementation possible.


Again, thank you to all who have provided feedback and who have otherwise
invested in improving marshbird monitoring in North America.

Jennifer
Jennifer Wheeler
Waterbird Coordinator
Waterbird Conservation for the Americas
---------------------------------------------------------
Division of Migratory Bird Management
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Mail Stop MBSP
Arlington, VA 22203
703-358-1931 (voice)
703-358-2217 (fax)
Jennifer_A_Wheeler@fws.gov
www.waterbirdconservation.org
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