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  2. Tracy Aviary Education Department

    Full-time Environmental Education Internship

    Internship begins February 26, 2019 and ends no sooner than May 18, 2019. DUTIES This position provides hands-on training and experience with the fundamentals of environmental education best practices, lesson plan creation, program facilitation, and evaluation. Duties will primarily include: -Planning, developing materials, and facilitating interactive experiences, tours, scout workshops, and other educational programs for visitors at Tracy Aviary. -Preparing materials for and assisting in the facilitation of children’s spring break camp programs. -Providing off-site nature programs at multiple locations throughout Salt Lake City to members of the public spanning a wide range of ages. These programs emphasize the importance of free play in nature and engage holistic family groups. -Evaluating programs and educational materials through evaluation forms and/or visitor observations. -Developing and implementing a capstone internship project. Please note: prior experience not required—we provide on-the-job training and education to prepare interns for educating members of the public. Other duties may include assisting with events, completing maintenance/administrative tasks associated with the programs described above, attending routine organizational and departmental meetings and events, and participating in various training opportunities, as appropriate. Please note that these positions do not involve any direct contact with animals. COMPENSATION $400/month for 3 months of service, disbursed twice a month MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS Must speak, read, and write English fluently. Fluency in Spanish is preferred, but not required. We are seeking individuals possessing a strong desire to work with audiences of all ages and to incorporate experiences that strengthen their connection to the natural world. Education: A bachelor’s degree in education, natural resources, environmental studies, conservation, biology, zoology, or related field from an approved college or university is preferred, but not required. Experience: None required. A desire to work within the field of education is strongly preferred. Experience with youth and/or students or other experience related to the above duties is preferred. COMMITMENT This position requires a 40 hour a week commitment over a period of roughly three months. Work hours require applicants to be freely available between 8am and 5pm during their designated work week for the entire duration of service. Position will require a set schedule of Tuesday through Saturday. Schedule may occasionally change or require evening hours depending on program schedule. Interns must secure their own housing for the duration of the internship. There is a possibility of extending this internship for an additional three months, with an altered weekly schedule, at the discretion of the Director of Education and Education Manager. HOW TO APPLY Applications are being accepted immediately. No telephone calls please. Send a cover letter, one-page resume, and three references to Marina Astin, Education Manager at marinaa@tracyaviary.org. Visit www.tracyaviary.org for more information regarding Tracy Aviary.
  3. FIELD ASSISTANT needed to assist with our ongoing Florida Scrub-Jay population monitoring and translocation program at Ocala National Forest and other nearby public lands. We have hired the winter banding/translocation position (posted earlier) and are now looking to hire the spring/summer breeding season position. Primary duties of this position will be to find and monitor nests, to install nest cameras, and to band and bleed nestlings. Other duties will include assisting with trap taming and banding wild birds, color band resighting and territory mapping, and collecting other data for concurrent scrub-jay projects at these sites. Candidates should have experience with a) reading and recording color bands, b) nest searching (ideally for passerines), and c) handling, banding, and (ideally) bleeding passerines. Good driving records and excellent physical fitness required, with experience working outdoors in humid climates and walking through heavy brush or standing on uneven ground for extended periods of time. Some overnight travel may be required. Position begins ca. March 1st and lasts 5-6 months). Hourly pay negotiable. Preference may be given to local applicants who already have housing in the area. FWC's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute is located in Gainesville, FL. To apply, please send a cover letter, resume, and the names of three references to Dr. Karl E. Miller @ karl.miller@myfwc.com as soon as possible. Make sure to describe your nest searching experience and your experience with banding and bleeding nestlings. Please put "SCRUB JAY FIELD ASSISTANT' in the subject line of your email. Applicants without current emails and phone numbers for their references will not be considered.
  4. Yesterday
  5. To apply please visit: https://www.paycomonline.net/v4/ats/web.php/jobs/ViewJobDetails?job=6972&clientkey=2267CE6F870D7B0E01B5E293AFFB82DE For more information: eagles.iowanation.org or www.facebook.com/GreySnowEagleHouse. For questions please contact: Megan Judkins, Aviary Director mjudkins@iowanation.org. Position to be filled as soon as possible. Summary of Responsibilities: The Aviary Assistant will assist the Aviary Assistant Manager in the daily care of the eagles, daily cleaning of the aviary, and educational presentations as needed. The incumbent will perform routine office activities necessary to facilitate the goals and objectives of the Eagle Aviary Program. Pay: $10.50-$12.00/hour Essential Duties and Responsibilities: • Participate in cleaning and disinfecting all cages as scheduled. • Ensure all offices, break areas, and buildings are cleaned and disinfected. • Participate in training new hires and volunteers to make sure that they know how all tasks are performed and at what quality the work should be at. • Responsible for the daily observation of raptor health and welfare. • Report maintenance issues and potential safety hazards to Aviary Supervisor or Aviary Management. • Attend training and provide Aviary staff a presentation on information gained in training. • Assist in preparing food for eagles on a scheduled basis. • Maintain a detailed log of aviary activities and program files as determined by funding sources. • Assist in outreach activities including presentations and tours for Tribal members and the community. • Assist with upkeep of the facility as necessary including basic construction and grounds maintenance. • Ensure education birds are properly cared for and trained if part of education program. • Participate in aviary committees, releases, fundraisers, etc. when asked or when individual possesses skills that would benefit the project. • Perform other duties as needed. Qualifications • Must possess good communication skills when dealing with Tribal members and the community. • Knowledge of Ioway’s or Native American cultural activities preferred. • Is required to sit and stoop, kneel, crouch or crawl. • Routine exposure to outside weather conditions, bird holding areas where noise level in the work environment may be loud. • Ability to lift and/or move items of up to fifty pounds. • Must be able to read, understand, apply and retain knowledge of departmental rules, regulations and policies. • Knowledge of animal behavior. • Knowledge of procedures used for the proper care and handling of native birds. • Knowledge of aviary safety rules and regulations. • Ability to tolerate stress working with native birds. • Ability to understand and follow oral and written instructions including procedures for care and maintenance of animals, exhibit, service and holding spaces. • Ability to exhibit patience when caring for animals. • Ability to exercise judgment concerning assigned work activities. • Skill in tact and diplomacy when interacting with co-workers, visitors and volunteers. • Skill in observation in order to recognize and evaluate conditions of animal health, diets and behavior. • Ability to work long hours when rescues occur or veterinary appointments are necessary.
  6. Location: NRCS office in Buckeye, West Virginia Scope of work: Under general supervision of NRCS District Conservationist and WVDNR State Ornithologist, conduct independent professional-level work related to Farm Bill implementation and outreach, management, research and conservation of golden-winged warbler, cerulean warbler, and other nongame and game birds on private and public lands in West Virginia, and additional duties as assigned. Projects and tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Assist partners (NRCS, NWTF, WVDOF, consulting foresters) in coordination and implementation of the (1) Golden-winged Warbler “Working Lands for Wildlife” programs on private lands in WV, and (2) Cerulean Warbler Appalachian Forestland Enhancement, and (3) farm bill programs Primary duties include: - Assisting in private landowner outreach, education, and service. - Development of management plans on private lands based on established best management practices - Administration of NRCS contracts. - Pursuing Golden-winged Warbler management opportunities on public and private lands - e.g., wildlife management areas, state forests, national forests as well as private lands within species focal areas. Assist staff on a case-by-case basis with similar efforts for Cerulean Warbler. - Professional development and education (e.g., participating in forest stewardship training workshops) related to Golden-winged warbler management, Cerulean Warbler management, and farm bill opportunities. - Pre- and post-treatment species survey and monitoring. Other duties as assigned. Up to 2-3 weeks/year, assist WVDNR with (1) annual surveys and monitoring of species of greatest conservation need, (2) conducting breeding bird surveys, (3) assist in providing technical assistance to private landowners related to SGCN habitat enhancement, (4) preparing annual WVDNR project and progress reports and statistics, and (5) assist WVDNR staff with reporting Qualifications: Bachelor’s or graduate degree in wildlife biology or related field, or commensurate work, with a focus on birds. Excellent networking and communication skills in a broad range of contexts Experience with project management and coordination Understanding of silvicultural practices, habitat management, and conservation implementation Experience with diverse field survey/monitoring methods and equipment, including GPS Ability to identify by sight and sound all bird species native to West Virginia Demonstrated experience and skill with MS Office, ArcGIS and other software tools Term and Compensation: Compensation is $16/hour for a total of 1733 hours in a calendar year (approximately 10 months at 40 hours/week), with substantial leeway for weekly schedule flexibility. This position’s term period is 1/1/19 to 12/31/20 (two years), with a possibility of extension beyond this period. Applications must be received by 11/30/18. To Apply, please send cover letter, resume, and completed application for employment provided here to: Richard Bailey, WVDNR State Ornithologist - Richard.S.Bailey@wv.gov Application for temporary employment.pdf
  7. Oceano Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area is currently recruiting for several Senior Park Aide/Environmental Services Intern (ESI) positions for the 2019 Western Snowy Plover and California Least Tern nesting season (March to September) General Duties include: Conduct monitoring for two federally listed bird species, the threatened snowy plover and the endangered least tern, including monitoring adults, nests, chicks and broods Fence, sign, and nest exclosure installation and maintenance Collect scientific field notes, data entry, and technical report writing Work with the public as a State Park representative and with an interdisciplinary team ESI Specific Duties Include: Gain experience in the methods and ethics of professional conduct and practice May perform more independent duties in areas of particular expertise Applicants should have the following qualities: Be flexible, open minded, and able to reason logically Have interest and aptitude in the work Be able to take direction and establish and maintain effective working relationships Work well with the public as a State Park representative Ability to work under adverse conditions such as in heavy wind and moving sand Be able to cope with sitting for extended periods monitoring by spotting scope Be able to lift up to 50 pounds Ability to read and record color band data Willingness to do routine work in order to learn Have experience writing scientific field notes and reports Ability to draw sound conclusions and make appropriate recommendations Have a clean Class C Driver license and be able to operate a 4-wheel drive vehicle Have knowledge of general concepts related to biological and environmental issues BA/BS in biological sciences or related field required for qualification as an ESI Birding experience preferred Starting wage is $13.42/hour (Senior Park Aide) or $13.53/hour (ESI), with one week paid sick after a qualifying pay period (160 hours) and vacation time after six months of employment have been completed. The position is a seasonal full time position (up to 1500 hours/ per year). Housing is not provided. Weekend, holiday, early morning (before dawn), and evening shifts will be required. You will receive full training and work with some of the best experts in the field! If interested, please mail a Standard State Application (http://jobs.ca.gov/pdf/std678.pdf) by 16 January 2019 to: Mr. Ronnie Glick, Senior Environmental Scientist, at the address above. For more information, contact Ronnie at 805-773-7180, email: ronnie.glick@parks.ca.gov
  8. Tracks made by dinosaurs the size of sparrows have been discovered in South Korea by an international team of palaeontologists. View the full article
  9. How would you move through a space when you can't see the obstacles ahead? For example, how would you find your way out of a maze if you were blindfolded? You could either use your other senses, such as touch, to find your way out – or better yet, you could get someone who can see the way out to direct you. But either way you need information. View the full article
  10. It may not be your actual Superman, but participants to ESA's ɸ-week are certainly embracing some 'superhero' ideas for the future of Earth observation, including high-flying platforms – something between a satellite and an aircraft. View the full article
  11. As part of the cellular conservation of endangered species, a research group initiated a primary cell culture project aimed at preserving endangered avian species in Japan, such as the Okinawa rail. However, primary cells cannot be cultured indefinitely because of cellular senescence and stresses caused by cell culture. To overcome these cell culture limitations, primary cells must be immortalized. As a result, the researchers obtained the immortalized avian cells with cell cycle regulation gene expression. View the full article
  12. Last week
  13. Conservation InSight is a nonprofit scientific research organization focused on providing sound solutions for avian conservation issues. Our mission is to provide evidence-based scientific findings that may be used by federal and state agencies, natural resource managers, and communities to inform decision making. We are currently seeking FIELD TECHNICIANS (3-5) to join our Florida team for the 2019 field season to assist with a long-term demographic study of the federally endangered Cape Sable seaside sparrow in Everglades National Park. This position is temporary: 18 March 2019 – 19 July 2019. Salary: $2,100/mo. We are looking for applicants who are detail-oriented, organized, able to work as part of a team, and who are enthusiastic about working in remote locations under sometimes harsh field conditions (e.g., heat, humidity, mosquitoes, and venomous snakes). Experience: Previous avian research experience is required. Experience working with passerines in grassland habitat including nest searching and conducting point count surveys using distance sampling and/or time-of-detection sampling are strongly preferred. Passerine banding experience is a plus, as is experience deploying and maintaining nest video surveillance systems. Candidates who are proficient in MS Excel and have prior experience entering data in MS Access are desired. Duties will include, but are not limited to: · Conducting point count surveys in remote areas · Locating and monitoring nests in grassland habitat · Deploying and maintaining nest cameras · Re-sighting previously color-banded birds · Territory mapping using GPS · Vegetation sampling · Data entry and management · Some outreach Fieldwork will be conducted in early mornings (beginning pre-dawn) 5-6 days/week; afternoons will be spent entering data, maintaining equipment, and conducting outreach (e.g., writing blogs or developing social media posts). Shared housing in Homestead, FL will be provided. Field crew will travel to and from remote field sites by car/foot or by helicopter. DOI helicopter certification will be provided. Applicants must provide their own transportation to South Florida and have their own vehicle for getting to and from field sites. Sites are ~10-30 miles from housing. Fuels costs for travel to study sites will be reimbursed. Applicants must be physically fit and able to carry 20-50 pounds of field equipment at times. To apply: Send a letter of interest addressed to Dr. Tom Virzi, along with a resume and three references (include names, emails, and phone numbers) to tvirzi@conservationinsight.org. Please include “CSSS Field Tech” in the subject line of your email. Deadline to apply: December 31, 2018 (or until filled).
  14. Ellen Paul

    Patrick J. Gould, 1934-2018

    Patrick J. Gould was born 1934, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona, and served as a Research Curator for the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program, 1963-1964. He authored a text of Techniques for Shipboard Surveys of Marine Birds and another on the Distribution and Abundance of Marine Birds and Mammals Wintering in the Kodiak Area of Alaska and other papers and texts about marine birds. He worked for the USGS Biological Resources Division in Alaska.
  15. Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, or Professor of Ecology Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Kennesaw State University is now accepting applications for a nine-month, tenure track Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, or Professor of Ecology faculty position in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology which begins August 2019. Responsibilities will include teaching, scholarship, and service in the area of Ecology. An earned doctorate in biology, ecology, or related disciplines or the foreign equivalent is required. For more than 50 years, Kennesaw State University has been known for its entrepreneurial spirit and sense of community. Offering campuses in Marietta and Kennesaw, the university is located just north of Atlanta and combines a suburban setting with access to one of the country’s most dynamic cities. As Georgia’s third-largest university, Kennesaw State offers more than 100 undergraduate and graduate degrees, including a growing number of doctoral programs. Designated by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia as a comprehensive university, Kennesaw State is committed to becoming a world-class academic institution positioned to broaden its academic and research missions and expand its scope on a local, regional and national level. For a full description of this position, application deadlines, and application procedures, visit https://facultyjobs.kennesaw.edu/postings/5657 Kennesaw State University, a member of the University System of Georgia, is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, and/or veteran status. Georgia is an Open Records state.
  16. Call for Applications: 2019 AIBS Emerging Public Policy Leadership Award Please share this announcement with interested graduate students Each year, the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) recognizes graduate students in the biological sciences who are demonstrating an interest and aptitude for working at the intersection of science and policy. Recipients of the AIBS Emerging Public Policy Leadership Award receive: A trip to Washington, DC, to participate in the AIBS Congressional Visits Day, an annual event where scientists meet with lawmakers to advocate for federal investment in the biological sciences, with a primary focus on the National Science Foundation. The event will be held on March 18-20, 2019. Domestic travel and hotel expenses are paid for the winners. Policy and communications training, including information on the legislative process and trends in federal science funding, and how to engage with policymakers and the news media. Meetings with lawmakers to discuss the importance of federal investment in the biological sciences. A one-year AIBS membership, including a subscription to the journal BioScience and a copy of "Communicating Science: A Primer for Working with the Media." The 2019 award is open to U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents enrolled in a graduate degree program in the biological sciences, science education, or a closely allied field. Applicants should have a demonstrated interest in and commitment to science policy and/or science education policy. Prior recipients, including Honorable Mentions, are not eligible for the award. The deadline to apply is January 14, 2019. Learn more https://www.aibs.org/public-policy/eppla.html?ct=t(EPPLA_2019)
  17. The San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) is seeking three interns to assist with waterbird projects. Two full-time Waterbird Interns will assist with waterbird field studies. One part-time Colonial Waterbird Intern will assist with the Colonial Waterbird Project. Please see below for details of each position. WATERBIRD INTERNSHIPS (2) The two waterbird internships will begin in January 2019 with a 3-month commitment with the possibility for extension depending on project availability and intern performance. The internships will be based in Milpitas, CA. The interns will receive training and mentorship from SFBBO staff and will develop their skills in waterbird survey techniques and data management. The interns will be assisting with surveys at managed ponds in support of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (www.southbayrestoration.org). The interns may assist with additional projects in the Waterbird Program, including SFBBO’s California Gull Research and Monitoring, Colonial Waterbird Nest Monitoring, and Avian Disease Prevention programs (https://www.sfbbo.org/avian-science.html). Key Responsibilities: · Conduct waterbird surveys and water quality sampling at South Bay ponds · Conduct gull counts and behavioral survey at local landfills · Work with SFBBO staff, partner agencies, and volunteers to coordinate field work · Enter, proof, and manage data collected · Assist with equipment maintenance and other SFBBO projects as assigned Required Qualifications: · Coursework toward a degree in biology, ecology, or related field · Familiarity with waterbird species of the San Francisco Bay (including shorebirds, waterfowl and gulls) · Good physical condition and enthusiasm for long days in the field · Willingness to tolerate harsh field conditions (mud, sun, dust, salt spray) · Willingness to work irregular hours including early mornings, evenings and some weekends · Strong work ethic, organizational skills, and attention to detail · Valid driver’s license, clean driving record, and reliable personal vehicle · Ability to navigate and orient using maps · Ability to work independently and as part of a team · Effective oral and written communication skills Preferred Qualifications: · Recently completed BA/BS in biology, ecology, or related field · Excellent waterbird identification skills · Off-road driving experience (SFBBO truck provided for off-road driving) · Solid computer skills, including working knowledge of MS Access and Excel · Experience conducting field work in the San Francisco Bay Compensation: Applicants should be students or recent graduates (within the last year) with a degree in wildlife biology, environmental science or a related field. This is a full-time internship position. A stipend of $125/week will be provided. Shared housing may be available at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Fremont, CA for non-residents. An SFBBO vehicle or reimbursement for use of a personal vehicle will be available for pre-approved, work-related travel. SFBBO will provide most field gear, including a spotting scope. COLONIAL WATERBIRD INTERSHIP (1) The San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) is seeking a part-time intern to assist with the Colonial Waterbird Project. The internship will begin January 1, 2019 and extend through August 31, 2019. The internship will be based in Milpitas, CA, although many tasks can be completed remotely. The intern will receive training and mentorship from SFBBO staff and will develop their skills in data management, volunteer management, and waterbird survey techniques. The intern’s primary role will be managing volunteers, data entry, and maintaining a database for the Colonial Waterbird Monitoring Project, a citizen science project. The intern may also assist with SFBBO’s California Gull Research and Monitoring and Avian Disease Prevention programs (https://www.sfbbo.org/avian-science.html). Key Responsibilities: · Manage volunteer site assignments and respond to inquiries · Enter, proof, and manage colonial waterbird data collected by citizen scientists · Prepare short summary reports of colonial waterbird data for local organizations · Prepare training materials for citizen scientists and plan or participate in outreach events · Conduct gull counts in the field during breeding season · Assist with surveys to collect dead, diseased, and injured birds in South Bay sloughs as part of an effort to prevent avian botulism outbreaks · Work with SFBBO staff, partner agencies, and volunteers to coordinate field work · Assist with other SFBBO projects as assigned Required Qualifications: · Coursework toward a degree in biology, ecology, or related field · Solid computer skills and experience with data entry, proofing, and analysis · Strong work ethic, organizational skills, and attention to detail · Ability to work independently and as part of a team · Effective oral and written communication skills · Interest in working with volunteers/citizen scientists Preferred Qualifications: · Familiarity with waterbird species of the San Francisco Bay · Experience using Microsoft Access and Excel · Experience doing fieldwork with spotting scopes · Previous participation in citizen science programs Applicants should be students or recent graduates (within the last year) with a degree in wildlife biology, environmental science or a related field. The internship is unpaid and hours can be used for volunteer or course credit if approved by your university. The internship will require 5-10 hours per week, including weekly meetings with the Program Director. Select weeks with field work (e.g. Gull Surveys in mid-May) may require up to 15 hours per week on a limited basis. If field work is performed, an SFBBO vehicle or reimbursement for use of a personal vehicle will be available for pre-approved, work-related travel. SFBBO will also provide most field gear, including a spotting scope. TO APPLY Please e-mail the following materials to Dr. Max Tarjan, mtarjan@sfbbo.org: 1) cover letter, 2) resume, and 3) list of three references (names, email addresses, and phone numbers). Indicate in your cover letter whether you would like to be considered for a Waterbird Internship, the Colonial Waterbird Internship, or both. Include all materials in one Word or PDF file, and include your last name in the file name. Include “Waterbird Internship” in the e-mail subject. The deadline for applications is November 30th. SFBBO is an EOE.
  18. Description: Located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula on the shore of Lake Superior, Whitefish Point is the premier migration watch site in the state. Whitefish Point Bird Observatory, a program of Michigan Audubon, is seeking a Spring Migration Hawk Counter that can provide accurate raptor identification and reporting, while providing educational interpretation to site visitors. Applicant must possess strong raptor and general bird identification skills, including aging. Prior hawkwatch experience is highly preferred. Duties include conducting the daily count, interacting with visitors, completion of field data forms, and posting daily results. Preparing and conducting an end of season presentation and/or reports are also required. While the position requires a great deal of independence, it will be supported by staff from Michigan Audubon’s headquarters. Consistent, clear, professional communication with supervisors, colleagues, stakeholders, and visitors is a must. This is a seasonal position from 15 March to 31 May and overtime may be required. Qualifications and Requirements: Familiarity with hawk migration and experience identifying all eastern North American raptors is required. Enthusiastic, dedicated and motivated self-starter who can work independently in sometimes difficult conditions. While not required, previous environmental interpretation and/or teaching skills are ideal, but a passion for connecting raptor and habitat conservation to the community is essential. Applicants should have experience interacting with the public and excellent interpersonal skills. Careful data collecting skills a must. Must be computer/tablet literate and capable of entering and managing data (computer access can be provided). Must be able to climb multiple steep steps. Flexibility to adjust hours to meet needs of department and organization, including the potential of working overtime hours. Transportation necessary to get from provided housing to count site. This requires a reliable vehicle and a clean, valid driver’s license to operate a vehicle in Michigan. Must have a personal pair of binoculars and spotting scope is preferred. Early season weather is often harsh and very cold, with few people visiting the site in these conditions. A dedicated, self-motivated individual who can both work well with people and endure challenging conditions in a remote location is required. Duration: Field season is for 6 days/week from March 15-May 31, 2019. A final season report is due June 7, 2019. Job Type: Seasonal; Contracted Application Deadline: December 1, 2018 Compensation: $3,900-4,200 total for the contract period; includes housing. To Apply: Applicants should submit a cover letter, a resume with relevant experience, and contact information for three references (include phone and email) to Linnea Rowse at lrowse@michiganaudubon.org. Number of Openings: One www.michiganaudubon.org www.wpbo.org
  19. Description: Located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula on the shore of Lake Superior, Whitefish Point is a prime migration site for many northern species of owls, winter finches, eastern warblers, and is a breeding site for passerines, raptors, and black flies. Whitefish Point Bird Observatory, a program of Michigan Audubon, is seeking a Field Ornithologist to conduct migration counts and provide programming to visitors. Applicants should be adept at identifying hawks and waterbirds at a distance, and landbirds by both sight and sound. Prior field experience is highly preferred. Duties include (but are not limited to): lead regular naturalist walks (approx. two per week), provide habitat assessments, participate in habitat improvements, lead informational talks on local avian communities and habitats, perform regular landbird censuses at the site, ensure data entry is complete and timely (including eBird, Avian Knowledge Network, and regular communication with Dunkadoo staff), write blog updates, provide daily public outreach (including updates to daily bird list in the Owl’s Roost), compile a seasonal report, organize and lead a Birdathon, and serve as exemplary Michigan Audubon ambassador at Spring Fling event (regular duties are secondary to event duties). Field Ornithologist will also conduct hawk and waterbird migration counts as part of the job duties to fill in for Hawk Counter and Waterbird Counter positions. While the position requires a great deal of independence, it will be supported by staff from Michigan Audubon’s headquarters. Consistent, clear, professional communication with supervisors, colleagues, stakeholders, and visitors is a must. This is a seasonal position from 15 March to 31 May and overtime may be required. Qualifications and Requirements: Familiarity with bird migration and experience identifying eastern North American birds is required, including eastern raptors and waterbirds. Enthusiastic, dedicated and motivated self-starter who can work independently in sometimes difficult conditions. While not required, previous environmental interpretation and/or teaching skills are ideal, but a passion for connecting bird and habitat conservation to the community is essential. Applicants should have experience interacting with the public and excellent interpersonal skills. Careful data collecting skills a must. Must be computer/tablet literate and capable of entering and managing data (computer access can be provided). Must be able to climb multiple steep steps. Flexibility to adjust hours to meet needs of department and organization, including the potential of working overtime hours. Transportation necessary to get from provided housing to count site. This requires a reliable vehicle and a clean, valid driver’s license to operate a vehicle in Michigan. Must have a personal pair of binoculars and spotting scope is preferred. Early season weather is often harsh and very cold, with few people visiting the site in these conditions. A dedicated, self-motivated individual who can both work well with people and endure challenging conditions in a remote location is required. Duration: Field season is for 6 days/week from March 15-May 31, 2019. A final season report is due June 7, 2019. Job Type: Seasonal; Contracted Application Deadline: December 1, 2018 Compensation: $3,500-4,500 total for the contract period; includes housing. To Apply: Applicants should submit a cover letter, a resume with relevant experience, and contact information for three references (include phone and email) to Linnea Rowse at lrowse@michiganaudubon.org. Number of Openings: One Position is open until filled. Check out our websites and blogs for more info: http://www.wpbo.org/blog/ www.michiganaudubon.org www.wpbo.org
  20. Description: Located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula on the shore of Lake Superior, Whitefish Point is the premier migration watch site in the state. Whitefish Point Bird Observatory, a program of Michigan Audubon, is seeking a Spring Migration Waterbird Counter that can provide accurate waterbird identification and reporting, while providing educational interpretation to site visitors. Applicant must possess strong waterbird and general bird identification skills. Prior field experience is highly preferred. Duties include conducting the daily count, interacting with visitors, completion of field data forms, and posting daily results. Preparing and conducting an end of season presentation and/or reports are also required. While the position requires a great deal of independence, it will be supported by staff from Michigan Audubon’s headquarters. Consistent, clear, professional communication with supervisors, colleagues, stakeholders, and visitors is a must. This is a seasonal position from 15 April to 31 May and overtime may be required. Qualifications and Requirements: Familiarity with waterbird migration and experience identifying all eastern North American waterbirds is required. Enthusiastic, dedicated and motivated self-starter who can work independently in sometimes difficult conditions. While not required, previous environmental interpretation and/or teaching skills are ideal, but a passion for connecting bird and habitat conservation to the community is essential. Applicants should have experience interacting with the public and excellent interpersonal skills. Careful data collecting skills a must. Must be computer/tablet literate and capable of entering and managing data (computer access can be provided). Flexibility to adjust hours to meet needs of department and organization, including the potential of working overtime hours. Transportation necessary to get from provided housing to count site. This requires a reliable vehicle and a clean, valid driver’s license to operate a vehicle in Michigan. Must have a personal pair of binoculars and spotting scope is preferred. Early season weather is often harsh and very cold, with few people visiting the site in these conditions. A dedicated, self-motivated individual who can both work well with people and endure challenging conditions in a remote location is required. Duration: Field season is for 6 days/week from April 15 to May 31, 2019. A final season report is due June 7, 2019. Job Type: Seasonal; Contracted Application Deadline: December 1, 2018 Compensation: $2,100-2,500 total for the contract period; includes housing. To Apply: Applicants should submit a cover letter, a resume with relevant experience, and contact information for three references (include phone and email) to Linnea Rowse at lrowse@michiganaudubon.org. Number of Openings: One www.michiganaudubon.org www.wpbo.org
  21. Researchers have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the 10-gram weight category -- with the small birds flying around 13,000 kilometers or longer to reach their destination. View the full article
  22. In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse -- the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. During the event, researchers watched radar to observe the behavior of birds and insects. View the full article
  23. Hi Hendrik, Yes, we had this issue already with some other roof top calibrations. I must admit that on bird works better. The calibration consists of the two main parameters - slope (mean+- sd) of measured irradiance vs expected irradiance. Mean should be the same, but the sd differs between the roof top and the on bird. Hope this helps, Eldar
  24. Male songbirds that had better early life conditions as nestlings sing more often and produce more complex songs as adults, according to a study by Lucy Magoolagan from Lancaster University, publishing November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. View the full article
  25. firasabe

    Field Biologist

    Job Description: The Peregrine Fund is seeking several field biologists to assist in research and restoring the population of the endangered Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus venator) in the central mountains of Puerto Rico. The project goal is to determine the population status and number of nesting pairs, and increase the productivity through captive propagation and release of young. The field work will be during the breeding season from January to August 2019 and involve searching for territorial pairs and individuals, monitor previously known nesting pairs, assist in propagation activities and release young back to the wild. The early breeding season work will require driving mountain roads and hiking in rainforests to survey and search from vantage points or lookouts over public and private montane forested habitat for displaying hawks and potential nesting pairs. The candidates should be in good physical condition as work will involve hiking in undulating forested habitat to locate potential and known nesting pairs and conducted nest observations for productivity. Later in the season all young raised in captivity will be released and monitored until they reach independence. An applicant has to be comfortable working long hours in humid and wet weather, self-motivated and able to work both alone and with others. Experience trapping and banding raptors and accessing nests is highly desirable. Above all, a positive attitude and desire to work and learn are qualities expected of candidates. The field team will be in constant communication with a field supervisor and propagation specialist. Some intermediate/advanced Spanish is desirable and beneficial. Salary: a salary will be provided and to be determined based on experience. Housing: will be provided in a 3-bedroom house with a kitchen and laundry. Vehicle: the use of a vehicle will be provided. Qualification Required or Highly Desirable: · Previous field experience with raptors - as it is important to be familiar with raptor behavior and identification · Banding and trapping of raptors · Tree climbing for accessing nests · Navigating with topography maps and hand-held GPS units · A valid driver’s license is required · Previous experience in avian incubation and/or rearing young avian species Desired Qualifications: · Conversational Spanish · Experience using telemetry to track wildlife To Apply: Submit electronically (email) by December 15, 2019 or until the positions are filled. · Resume/CV (two pages maximum) with three references · A one page cover letter highlighting field experience · Name the file as LastName_FirstName_PRSSHFieldBiologist Contact: Russell Thorstrom: RThorstrom@Peregrinefund.org
  26. The successful candidate will conduct research on king rails and other secretive marsh birds in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, as part of a Great Lakes basin-wide monitoring effort funded by the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, with additional potential funding from U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Research will include multi-scale monitoring and modeling of king rail habitat, as well as assessing traditional callback surveys for marsh bird population estimates. Field work will occur in southeast Michigan and northwest Ohio. Funding will consist of a mixture of research and teaching assistantship support. More Information about the PhD program in Earth and Ecosystem Science at CMU: https://www.cmich.edu/colleges/se/EES/Pages/default.aspx Academic requirements include a B.S. degree in biology, wildlife, or related field with GPA > 3.0 and competitive GRE scores. Candidates must also have a valid driver’s license, demonstrated strong work ethic, previous research experience, strong verbal and written communication skills, GIS experience, and quantitative skills. Preferred candidates are those with a M.S. degree in biology, wildlife, or related field; research experience in population assessment and analysis; publication and/or conference presentation track record; leadership skills and supervision of technicians; demonstrated ability to interact positively with the public and agency personnel; ability to work independently; and able to conduct field work in a variety of conditions. If interested, provide Dr. Tom Gehring via email (gehri1tm@cmich.edu) with a single PDF that includes: 1) a 1-page letter of interest describing your qualifications, experience and professional goals; 2) CV; 3) GPA and unofficial transcripts; 4) GRE scores; and 5) contact information for at least 3 professional references.
  27. Climate change may be the main reason behind a great decline in shorebird populations around the world, researchers found. After looking at 38,191 nests of 111 species across the world, the team found that rates of daily nest predation in the Arctic in particular have increased threefold in the last 70 years. Usually, the tropics see more nest predation because of a greater variety of predators, prompting many shorebirds to migrate to colder regions. But the Arctic is proving to not be so safe, researchers found, and nest predation is also rising in more temperate zones in Europe, Asia and North America. The authors point to climate change, which is leading predators to search for alternative prey as altered snow cover causes declines in their traditional prey. Read more in the Yorkshire Post or check out the study in Science. View the full article
  28. Earlier this year, a heartbreaking drama played out near Vancouver Island. An endangered orca named J35 carried her dead calf for weeks in an apparent mourning ritual captivating onlookers around the world. View the full article
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