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  2. Klamath Bird Observatory www.KlamathBird.org invites applications for one (1) bird banding assistant internship position openings. We are seeking a highly motivated individual to participate in our long-term landbird monitoring program in the Klamath-Siskiyou Bioregion of southern Oregon and northern California during the breeding season – 1 May through 31 July, 2018. Training and duties will include mist netting and banding songbirds, bird survey, data quality-assurance, entry, and management. Other duties include study and discussion of banding and biology instructional materials, equipment maintenance, and field station upkeep. Training and operations will adhere to North American Banding Council guidelines with a focus on safe, ethical mist netting and banding and advanced bird ageing/sexing techniques. Rustic housing is provided. This position does not offer a stipend. The successful candidate will have a strong interest in birds and field biology, a positive and constructive attitude toward cooperative work in reaching project objectives, giving priority to safety considerations, work and live harmoniously in close company with coworkers. Additional qualities include: ability to follow protocols precisely, attention to detail, good physical condition, excellent communication skills, dedicated to study in spare time, willing and able to work long days in the field under (sometimes) adverse conditions (hot days, cold days, mosquitoes). This is a terrific opportunity to build practical experience in field biology and master a variety of bird monitoring and research skills in a long-running banding-training program. The position will involve long days filled with hard work, a lot of driving and camping, and a lot of fun! Application deadline ongoing until the position has been filled. To apply, email a single PDF document containing a cover letter (include dates available), resume with related experiences and references to Robert Frey at bif@klamathbird.org.
  3. The Intermountain Bird Observatory is hosting two raptor-related workshops: an introductory field techniques workshop (September 3-7, 2018), and a North American Banding Council (NABC) certification session (September 17-21, 2018). We developed the introductory workshop for folks with little to no raptor banding experience. The workshop is well suited for students, birders, naturalists, biological consultants, and anyone interested in learning more about raptor identification, trapping or banding. Topics we will cover include: safe handling of live raptors, introduction to banding techniques, identifying, ageing and sexing, taking measurements, properly caring for lure birds, recording accurate data, common capture techniques at migration stations (bow net, dho gaza, mist net), road trapping (Bal-chatri design and use), breeding season techniques (tree climbing, GHOW lure), a brief introduction to accessing raptor nests, and an introduction to raptor identification by flight style and shape. The NABC workshop - The mission of the NABC is to promote sound and ethical bird-banding practices and techniques. This is a separate workshop designed for folks that already have some level of raptor trapping and banding experience. NABC offers certification at three levels: Assistant, Bander, and Trainer, depending on your level of expertise and experience. Details of each workshop can be found at https://ibo.boisestate.edu/what-we-do/training/
  4. HETHnerd

    FLightR-only one calibration period

    Hey! Thanks again! Used the suggested changes and took LdeRaad's suggestion about changing model.ageing to TRUE. Output was as below but got Warning message below. Thoughts? Also please see notes below re map. #CALIBRATION Calibration.periods <- data.frame(calibration.start = as.POSIXct("2014-07-06"), calibration.stop = as.POSIXct("2014-08-01"), lon = CapLocs[1], lat = CapLocs[2]) #View results Calibration.periods #create a calibration object Calibration<-make.calibration(Proc.data = Light.Data, Calibration.periods = Calibration.periods, model.ageing = TRUE, plot.each = FALSE, plot.final = FALSE) checking dawn 1 checking dawn 2 checking dawn 3 checking dawn 4 checking dawn 5 checking dawn 6 checking dawn 7 checking dawn 8 checking dawn 9 checking dawn 10 checking dawn 11 checking dawn 12 checking dawn 13 checking dawn 14 #(etc, etc, I trimmed this) calibration method used: parametric.slope likelihood correction switched to TRUE simulation: 0% simulation: 1% simulation: 1% simulation: 1% simulation: 2% simulation: 2% simulation: 2% simulation: 3% simulation: #(etc etc, I trimmed this) Warning message: In get.calibration.parameters(Calibration.periods, Proc.data, model.ageing = model.ageing, : you have only one calibration period ageing estimation is unreliable and should be turned ot F!!! #re MAP Also, when I tried to plot a simple map #Plot a simple map map.FLightR.ggmap(Result) got this error: Error in f(...) : could not find function "viewport" Looked this up at http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/grid/html/viewport.html but really wasn't sure what to do here. Any suggestions anyone? Thanks gang!
  5. Yesterday
  6. American Bird Conservancy Conservation Specialist, Migratory Birds and Habitats Position Summary: Title: Conservation Specialist, Migratory Birds and Habitats Supervisor: Migratory Bird Program Director Location: Washington, D.C. or The Plains, VA Submission Deadline: May 15, 2018 This Conservation Specialist position is part of the Migratory Birds and Habitats Division’s Wintering Program. The position will work on cutting-edge conservation actions to protect migratory bird populations on their wintering grounds in Latin America and the Caribbean. This position will work to manage and expand existing migratory bird conservation projects, while also bringing sustainable development and restoration initiatives to action through ABC’s new BirdScapes framework. BirdScapes are large priority landscapes targeted for implementing new and innovative approaches to conservation including agroforestry, conservation ranching, and impact investing. The goal of this position is to provide ABC with expertise in sustainable development, restoration, agribusiness, and project management to facilitate landscape level conservation of wintering habitat for migratory birds in Latin American and the Caribbean. Primary Duties: · The Conservation Specialist will be expected to facilitate advancing on-the-ground conservation work for migratory birds throughout the Western Hemisphere with an emphasis on protecting habitat and reducing threats on wintering grounds and important migration stopover sites. · Other responsibilities include communication with Migratory Bird Joint Ventures, Partners in Flight, and other ABC partners in relation to wintering grounds activities as part of full life cycle conservation; assisting with fundraising activities, reviewing and writing reports, promotion and communications and information management. · Developing and implementing conservation strategies for migratory birds: ABC is expanding our conservation activities in Latin American and the Caribbean to include more economic based solutions for conservation. Habitat loss and degradation continue to be the largest threat to migratory bird populations. In addition to habitat protection, habitat restoration is a key need. ABC is working to identify products that can be produced in ways that contribute to bird conservation and also provide sustainable economic benefit for producers and landowners that expands protection and restoration of habitat. To date, ABC has identified coffee, cacao, black pepper, cardamom, cinnamon, and timber as potential products that could be produced and harvested to the benefit of migratory bird habitat. It will be the job of the Conservation Specialist to identify opportunities and develop strategies for projects that can bring economic and conservation value. The Conservation Specialist, will then work with partners to execute these collaboratively developed strategies. · Ensure sound project management and timely results: The Conservation Specialist will provide effective project management to ensure successful project execution that provides lasting results for migratory birds. This requires great communication skills with partners, problem solving, and budget management. The Conservation Specialist will also assess and evaluate ongoing and new conservation projects and partner effectiveness, and provide feedback to both the partner and ABC leadership about project advancements and issues. The position also requires working with internal ABC project management systems and staff including finance, development, communications, and management. · Assist with the generation of financing for conservation projects: Sustainable development, agribusiness, and habitat conservation require financing for execution. The Conservation Specialist will assist with traditional philanthropic fundraising with ABC’s Development Team, and also help develop non-traditional, and potentially non-philanthropic conservation finance mechanisms for projects that can facilitate habitat conservation. Experience in business, commodity chains, and economics is desired to help build a robust and financially sound platform for conservation investment from all sectors. Position Requirements: • Bachelor’s degree or higher in conservation biology or environmental science, wildlife management, ornithology, business management, agronomy, economics or related fields that provide applicant with knowledge and experience in conservation, project or non-profit management, and/or international sustainable development. • Knowledge of neotropical migrant birds and an understanding of migratory bird conservation issues along with habitat management experience, including habitat restoration. • Experience with sustainable development, agribusiness (forestry, agroforestry, agriculture, ranching), and/or business management. • Proven ability to be detail oriented, meet deadlines, manage multiple projects, and produce effective results. Entrepreneurial spirit and willingness to take initiative to go above and beyond. • Demonstrated leadership skills, and ability to solve problems and find effective solutions to complicated issues. • Previous experience working in partnership with other organizations and working effectively in cross-cultural situations. • An outgoing, positive, and friendly disposition with the creativity to bring fresh solutions for conservation results, and ability do so both independently and as part of a team. • Excellent networking, communications and management skills. • Fluency in English and Spanish required. Fluency in Portuguese or French is desirable. To Apply: Apply online at BambooHR: https://abcbirds.bamboohr.com/jobs/view.php?id=22 If you experience any trouble with the website, please send your cover letter and resume as one document to HR@abcbirds.org Migratory Bird Conservation Specialist.docx
  7. Researchers in the University of Wyoming's Department of Zoology and Physiology and Program in Ecology discovered that size does matter—as it pertains to the effectiveness of secondary species' wildlife protection relative to the size of a wildlife reserve set aside for an umbrella species. View the full article
  8. Researchers in the University of Wyoming's Department of Zoology and Physiology and Program in Ecology discovered that size does matter—as it pertains to the effectiveness of secondary species' wildlife protection relative to the size of a wildlife reserve set aside for an umbrella species. View the full article
  9. A proposed rule that would change a provision of the Endangered Species Act that has been used for 40 years to apply protections to threatened species is reportedly under consideration by the Interior Department. Called the “blanket 4(d) rule,” the provision extends most protections offered to endangered species to threatened species, essentially treating both groups of species the same. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crafted the blanket rule in 1978 to extend to threatened species a range of protections, including prohibitions on sale and transport of listed species along with a ban on take of these species. Take is defined by the law as to “harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect” or attempt to do any of these. The proposed rule change would affect how the USFWS implements Section 4(d) of the ESA. That section allows the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service to establish special regulations to protect threatened species based on their individual conservation needs, rather than prohibit all take as is done for species listed as endangered. USFWS occasionally creates a special 4(d) rule to allow certain actions that may result in take of a threatened species [...] View the full article
  10. National parks preserve habitat for hundreds of avian species in the United States. Researchers anticipate these protected areas will host even more extensive bird communities as climate change keeps transforming the landscape. “Climate change is a big driver in bird species assemblages in national parks,” said Joanna Wu, lead author on the study published in PLOS ONE. “National parks will be increasingly critical sanctuaries for birds seeking a suitable climate.” A National Audubon Society biologist, Wu and her colleagues modeled how 513 bird species would alter their distributions in 274 national parks throughout the country if atmospheric greenhouse gases persist into the middle of the century. They relied on the North American Breeding Bird Survey and the Audubon Christmas Bird Count and considered possible changes in temperature and precipitation using observations from the early 2000s. “One-quarter of birds in America’s national parks could be different by 2050 if carbon emissions continue at the current pace,” Wu said, with parks at higher latitudes in the Northeast and Midwest experiencing the most turnover. “As birds move to track the climate, parks may gain species along with all the ecological interactions, habitat availability and other complications that come with that,” she said. “In [...] View the full article
  11. The Greives lab is recruiting motivated PhD students interested in participating in research projects aimed at understanding how animals integrate environmental signals, time seasonal or daily transitions, and/or the selective pressures shaping seasonality of temperate breeding birds. Specific projects can vary based on research interests but may include investigations of relationships between variation in endocrine ‘phenotypes’ and daily and seasonal timing (e.g. timing of dawn song or seasonal clutch initiation), or investigations of the costs and benefits of timing decisions (e.g. timing of reproduction). The PhD student would join a department with expertise in organismal biology, ecophysiology, and evolutionary ecology, including four established and collaborative avian behavior/physiology labs (T. Greives, B. Heidinger, W. Reed, P. Klug). Students will begin August 2018 and will participate in either the Biological Sciences or Environmental and Conservation Sciences graduate program at NDSU. Preferred qualifications include: experience with mist netting, handling and obtaining blood samples from small birds and/or experience with lab techniques including PCR or ELISAs. Competitive stipend funding and tuition waivers via teaching and/or research assistantships are available. If you are interested in this position please contact Dr. Tim Greives at timothy[dot]greives[at]ndsu[dot]edu. Please include in your email your research experiences as well as your research interests and how these match with research in the Greives lab. Also please include your degree, GPA and two potential references.
  12. The Greives lab is recruiting motivated PhD students interested in participating in research projects aimed at understanding how animals integrate environmental signals, time seasonal or daily transitions, and/or the selective pressures shaping seasonality of temperate breeding birds. Specific projects can vary based on research interests but may include investigations of relationships between variation in endocrine ‘phenotypes’ and daily and seasonal timing (e.g. timing of dawn song or seasonal clutch initiation), or investigations of the costs and benefits of timing decisions (e.g. timing of reproduction). The PhD student would join a department with expertise in organismal biology, ecophysiology, and evolutionary ecology, including four established and collaborative avian behavior/physiology labs (T. Greives, B. Heidinger, W. Reed, P. Klug). Students will begin August 2018 and will participate in either the Biological Sciences or Environmental and Conservation Sciences graduate program at NDSU. Preferred qualifications include: experience with mist netting, handling and obtaining blood samples from small birds and/or experience with lab techniques including PCR or ELISAs. Competitive stipend funding and tuition waivers via teaching and/or research assistantships are available. If you are interested in this position please contact Dr. Tim Greives at timothy[dot]greives[at]ndsu[dot]edu. Please include in your email your research experiences as well as your research interests and how these match with research in the Greives lab. Also please include your degree, GPA and two potential references.
  13. Every year, North America's critically endangered Whooping Cranes travel back and forth along a 4,000-kilometer corridor linking their nesting grounds in Canada and their winter home in Texas. Habitat in their path through the northern Great Plains is being lost at an alarming rate to agriculture and other development, but the birds' widely dispersed movements make identifying key spots for protection a challenge. Now, researchers behind a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications have created a model of Whooping Crane habitat use with the potential to greatly improve the targeting of conservation efforts during their migration. View the full article
  14. Reposted... This summer our team is offering two workshops on the use of high-throughput sequencing to study gene expression and genetic variation. For more details, see this link or the description that follows. http://people.oregonstate.edu/~meyere/workshops.html We aim to train biologists with little or no NGS experience to prepare sequencing libraries and analyze the millions of DNA sequences that result. Participants are expected to provide DNA or RNA samples from their own study systems, and we will prepare sequencing libraries together from those samples as well as a shared set of samples for a group project. Participants will learn to analyze these data themselves using simple command line tools on a high-performance computing cluster. We’ll cover each step of the process from DNA or RNA in a tube, to millions of DNA sequences, to biological data on gene expression or genetic variation. Registration for these workshops includes room and board (three meals a day including plenty of coffee and snacks) throughout the workshop, and reagents/sequencing such that each participant can sequence and analyze a set of their own samples, generating pilot data for their species of interest. Our Tag-Seq workshop will run from Aug 10-18, and the 2bRAD workshop from Aug 18-26. Registration for either workshop alone costs $1,900. Participants enrolling in both workshops will pay a discounted rate of $3,700 altogether. For more details, including information from previous years’ workshops, please see the full posting at the following website:http://people.oregonstate.edu/~meyere/workshops.html Contact us with questions, with "Workshops 2018" in the subject line. To reserve your spot, please contact Demian Willette (demian.willette@lmu.edu). For specific questions about 2bRAD, contact Eli Meyer (eli.meyer@oregonstate.edu), and for specific questions about TagSeq, contact Carly Kenkel (ckenkel@usc.edu). Space is limited! To reserve your spot, please confirm your participation no later than May 15th and pay registration fee by June 15th. Thanks, hope to see some of you on Catalina this August! Eli Meyer, Oregon State University. eli.meyer@oregonstate.edu Demian Willette, Loyola Marymount University. demian.willette@lmu.edu Carly Kenkel, University of Southern California. ckenkel@usc.edu
  15. A new study about New Zealand's extinct moa, involving acid baths and concrete mixers, by researchers from the University of Canterbury and Landcare Research, has revealed a surprising finding about their ability to disperse tree seeds. View the full article
  16. HETHnerd

    FLightR-only one calibration period

    Thanks to both of you. I'm still working through the rest of the code so no results yet, but at least I haven't gotten an error message! Louise, I think I found you on line so I will email you and you can send me your script.
  17. Last week
  18. Step aside, charismatic polar bear stranded on a melting iceberg. The springtail may be the new flag bearer of an uncertain Arctic future. View the full article
  19. Animal species with males who compete intensively for mates might be more resilient to the effects of climate change, according to research by Queen Mary University of London. View the full article
  20. Please visit the new and improved BIRDNET. We continue to add new resources and update information. Added today: an important animal welfare document for wildlife biologists and their IACUCS And a downloadable Pennsyvlania permit application.
  21. Newly publicized audiovisuals support full species status for one of the dancing birds-of-paradise in New Guinea. This new species, called the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise, is found only in the island's far-western Bird's Head, or Vogelkop, region. View the full article
  22. Zookeepers in Prague have turned into puppeteers in an effort to save the critically endangered Javan green magpie. View the full article
  23. Louise de Raad

    FLightR-only one calibration period

    Depending on why you only have one calibration period (e.g. the tag died half way through, but you still recaptured the bird and retrieved the tag), you have to make some additional changes to the FlightR script: in the run.particle.filter function you may need to change "known.last=TRUE" to "known.last=FALSE" (because you won't know where the tag has died) and when you only have one calibration period, you also have to remove the model aging part in the make.calibration function: Calibration<-make.calibration(Proc.data, Calibration.periods, model.ageing = TRUE) I had the same issue as you did - don't have my note book with me here, but I have the correct script for you if the above doesn't work I can send it to you when I'm back in the office on Monday.
  24. We are seeking enthusiastic team players to staff HawkWatch International’s (HWI) network of HawkWatches in Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Wyoming, New Mexico, Texas, and Arizona. Crewmember duties will include a combination of standardized daily counts of migrating diurnal raptors, delivering outreach and education to site visitors (both scheduled and impromptu), and assisting with capture and banding of migrating raptors at HWI sites where banding operations occur (WA, OR, NV, WY, and NM). Individuals will be compensated a per diem that will range between $38 to $45 depending on experience and site location, and a $150 travel stipend to offset travel costs to the site. Per diem disbursed bi-weekly via direct deposit. Fall migration seasons run from mid-August through mid-November, specific dates are site-dependent. Applicants must have: good eyesight; be able to endure long hours in the field in highly variable weather; and have demonstrated birding and/or raptor-in-flight I.D. skills. They will also be able to pleasantly and professionally engage site visitors while representing HWI; be able to work well in a remote small team setting; and have excellent data-taking skills (detailed, accurate, and in accordance w/ protocols). Top applicants will possess previous raptor capture/handling and observation experience, currently hold or have previously held a banding sub-permit, and have extensive experience educating the public about raptors. Most of HawkWatch locations are in high-elevation remote areas and require camping; all crewmembers must supply their own camping gear and should have their own vehicle to access the sites (or trailheads near sites). Accommodations for days-off (one per week) or weather episodes are generally available in nearby local communities. Send inquiries or application packet (a single file (preferably pdf) including cover letter, resume, and contact information for three current references) to Dave Oleyar, doleyar@hawkwatch.org; and Jesse Watson, jwatson@hawkwatch.org. Please include location preferences and dates available in your cover letter. Visit www.hawkwatch.org for project descriptions and past technical reports. Review begins 1 May and positions are open until filled.
  25. Most people probably wouldn't consider bustling towns and cities good places for nature to thrive. Yet a few species of birds have so successfully adapted to city living that they boast large and thriving urban populations. Now, research has suggested that the success of these city-dwelling species may lie in their behaviour. View the full article
  26. For many experts, the loss of biodiversity around the world is a crisis of equal magnitude to climate change, yet public awareness remains low. To discuss how to change that, a panel of experts (including Sir David Attenborough!) hosted a high-profile event at Cambridge Conservation Initiative.View the full article
  27. Ellen Paul

    Kimberly Gray Smith, 1948- 2018

    Kimberly Gray Smith, 69, passed away in Fayetteville April 9, 2018. He was born July 19, 1948, in Manchester, Connecticut, to Robert H. and Janet (Simon) Smith. He was third of 5 children. He is survived by siblings Holiday Houck, Robert H. Smith, Jr., Wendelin J. Smith, Bradford S. Smith, their spouses and many nieces and nephews. Kim and his wife Peggy J. (Jones), of the home, were married 45 years (since 1972). Their daughter, Mallory and husband Sheldon Steinert of Fayetteville are parents of Erowyn, Simon, Laura, and Kara. Kim, as Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences at UA-Fayetteville, pursued research in various areas of terrestrial ecology. His interests ranged widely from black bears to birds to bugs. His formal education took him from Kimball Union Academy (prep school) in New Hampshire to undergraduate studies at Tufts University (B.S. 1971). He received advanced degrees from the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville (M.S. 1975) and Utah State University (Ph.D. 1982). Kim was a post-graduate research ecologist at Bodega Marine Lab, UC Berkley (1980-1981). He also served as Research Associate at Manomet Bird Observatory (1977-1980). Kim began his professional teaching and research career at UA-Fayetteville in fall 1981. He attained status as University Professor of Biological Sciences (2009) and Distinguished Professor (2015). During his career he was Departmental Chair of Biological Sciences (2004-2008) and a highly productive researcher and collaborator, with approximately 300 professional publications. Kim was a committed educator and nurtured students at various stages of career preparation and development, including 8 post-doctoral research associates, 23 doctoral students, 36 masters students, and many undergraduate honors students. Kim was deeply involved in numerous professional organizations in a variety of roles: officer, editor, meeting organizer, etc. He served as Editor in Chief of The Auk (2000-2004), the primary scientific journal of what is now the American Ornithological Society. In lieu of flowers, the family invites contributions to causes and activities valued by Kim. Specifics about contributions, as well as a celebration of Kim’s life will be announced on a future date. Kim presented a retirement seminar in the Department of Biological Sciences on April 5, just 4 days before his death. He entertained a packed room with an often humorous summary of his life and career, “Life in the Fast Lane: My Life as a Community Ecologist.” He ended his seminar with some advice to younger colleagues: “Be curious, be creative, challenge yourself to learn new things, learn the history of things that interest you, take students on field trips, take students abroad,” and finally, “have fun doing what you do … I did …” Cremation arrangements by Beard’s Funeral Chapel.
  28. Posted to Ecolog- We invite you to join us for a webinar given by Dr. Susan Singer scheduled for April 26th at 8:00 am Pacific Time. This first event of the Undergraduate Field Experiences Research Network is free and open to all. A very quick and easy registration is required. Register here. Undergraduate field experiences: Challenges and opportunities Thursday, April 26th, 2018, 8:00 am Pacific Time Register here -login information will be provided after registration- Dr. Singer is Provost and VP of Academic Affairs at Rollins College and will be our first speaker in the webinar series. She will provide an overview of the national landscape about undergraduate STEM education, will talk about authentic field experiences and the evidence for their value, and will highlight opportunities this network might address in using evidence to both improve undergraduate field experiences and broaden participation in STEM. Feel free to forward this message to colleagues. And if you haven't had a chance, be sure to check out our website at http://ufern.net! All the best, Kari O'Connell and the U-FERN Project Team
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